Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • It's the Second World War.

    翻訳: Natsuhiko Mizutani 校正: Naoki Funahashi

  • A German prison camp.

    第二次世界大戦のとき

  • And this man,

    ドイツの収容所で

  • Archie Cochrane,

    この男

  • is a prisoner of war and a doctor,

    アーチー・コクランは

  • and he has a problem.

    軍医でしたが捕虜として捕われ

  • The problem is that the men under his care

    問題を抱えていました

  • are suffering

    患者たちが病気で

  • from an excruciating and debilitating condition

    苦しみながら

  • that Archie doesn't really understand.

    衰弱していくという

  • The symptoms

    コクランに理解のできない状況でした

  • are this horrible swelling up of fluids under the skin.

    症状は

  • But he doesn't know whether it's an infection, whether it's to do with malnutrition.

    ひどい水ぶくれでした

  • He doesn't know how to cure it.

    感染症か栄養失調なのかわかりません

  • And he's operating in a hostile environment.

    治療法もわかりません

  • And people do terrible things in wars.

    しかもそこは敵地です

  • The German camp guards, they've got bored.

    戦時下にはひどいことがおきます

  • They've taken to just firing into the prison camp at random

    ドイツの監視兵は退屈すると

  • for fun.

    収容所に向けて

  • On one particular occasion,

    いたずらに発砲するのです

  • one of the guards threw a grenade into the prisoners' lavatory

    あるときには

  • while it was full of prisoners.

    捕虜たちでいっぱいのトイレに

  • He said he heard suspicious laughter.

    手榴弾が投げ込まれたこともありました

  • And Archie Cochrane, as the camp doctor,

    彼は不審な笑い声を耳にしたと言います

  • was one of the first men in

    収容所の軍医であるアーチー・コクランは

  • to clear up the mess.

    事態をなんとか打開しようとした

  • And one more thing:

    人のひとりでした

  • Archie was suffering from this illness himself.

    付け加えると

  • So the situation seemed pretty desperate.

    コクラン自身がその病気にかかっていました

  • But Archie Cochrane

    ずいぶん絶望的な状況です

  • was a resourceful person.

    ただアーチー・コクランは

  • He'd already smuggled vitamin C into the camp,

    抜け目のない男でした

  • and now he managed

    すでにビタミンCを手配しており

  • to get hold of supplies of marmite

    さらにこんどは

  • on the black market.

    闇ルートを通して

  • Now some of you will be wondering what marmite is.

    マーマイトを入手しました

  • Marmite is a breakfast spread beloved of the British.

    マーマイトとは何だろうと思われる方もいるでしょう

  • It looks like crude oil.

    イギリス人はこれをパンに塗るのを好みます

  • It tastes ...

    見た目は原油のようですが

  • zesty.

    その味ときたら

  • And importantly,

    ピリっとした味です

  • it's a rich source

    重要なことですが

  • of vitamin B12.

    マーマイトには

  • So Archie splits the men under his care as best he can

    ビタミンB12が豊富です

  • into two equal groups.

    アーチーは患者たちをできるだけ同じ条件の

  • He gives half of them vitamin C.

    二つのグループに分けました

  • He gives half of them vitamin B12.

    一方にはビタミンCを与え

  • He very carefully and meticulously notes his results

    もう一方にはビタミンB12を与えました

  • in an exercise book.

    細心の注意をはらって結果を

  • And after just a few days,

    ノートに記録しました

  • it becomes clear

    数日たつと

  • that whatever is causing this illness,

    病気の理由は何であれ

  • marmite is the cure.

    マーマイトで治せることが

  • So Cochrane then goes to the Germans who are running the prison camp.

    はっきりしてきました

  • Now you've got to imagine at the moment --

    そこで収容所を運営していたドイツ兵に面会を求めます

  • forget this photo, imagine this guy

    そのようすを想像してみてください

  • with this long ginger beard and this shock of red hair.

    この写真は忘れて この男に

  • He hasn't been able to shave -- a sort of Billy Connolly figure.

    長い赤ひげと もじゃもじゃの赤毛を付けてください

  • Cochrane, he starts ranting at these Germans

    ずっとひげも剃れなくて ビリー・コノリーのような風体です

  • in this Scottish accent --

    コクランは熱弁をふるいます

  • in fluent German, by the way, but in a Scottish accent --

    こんなスコットランド訛の ー

  • and explains to them how German culture was the culture

    訛ってはいても流暢なドイツ語です

  • that gave Schiller and Goethe to the world.

    シラーやゲーテを生んだドイツの文化の

  • And he can't understand

    何たるかを語り

  • how this barbarism can be tolerated,

    そんなドイツでこのような

  • and he vents his frustrations.

    野蛮が許されるとは理解しがたいと訴えます

  • And then he goes back to his quarters,

    彼は不満を爆発させます

  • breaks down and weeps

    それから彼は自分の兵舎に戻り

  • because he's convinced that the situation is hopeless.

    絶望してすすり泣きます

  • But a young German doctor

    望みがない事態だと確信したからです

  • picks up Archie Cochrane's exercise book

    しかし若いドイツ人の医師が

  • and says to his colleagues,

    アーチー・コクランのノートを手に取り

  • "This evidence is incontrovertible.

    同僚に言います

  • If we don't supply vitamins to the prisoners,

    この証拠に議論の余地はない

  • it's a war crime."

    捕虜たちにビタミンを与えないと

  • And the next morning,

    戦争犯罪になるぞ

  • supplies of vitamin B12 are delivered to the camp,

    翌朝には

  • and the prisoners begin to recover.

    収容所にビタミンB12が届けられ

  • Now I'm not telling you this story

    捕虜たちは回復し始めました

  • because I think Archie Cochrane is a dude,

    さてこの話をした理由は

  • although Archie Cochrane is a dude.

    コクランが大人物と思うからではなく

  • I'm not even telling you the story

    ー もちろんアーチー・コクランは大人物ですが ー

  • because I think we should be running

    公共政策のあらゆる面において

  • more carefully controlled randomized trials

    注意深く管理された

  • in all aspects of public policy,

    ランダム化比較試験が望ましいと

  • although I think that would also be completely awesome.

    言うためでもありません

  • I'm telling you this story

    その訴えも実にすばらしいこととは思います

  • because Archie Cochrane, all his life,

    この話をした理由は

  • fought against a terrible affliction,

    アーチー・コクランが生涯に渡って

  • and he realized it was debilitating to individuals

    戦っていたやっかいな悩みの種だからです

  • and it was corrosive to societies.

    それが個人を弱らせ 社会を腐敗させるものだと

  • And he had a name for it.

    コクランは気付いていました

  • He called it the God complex.

    彼はそれをこう名付けていました

  • Now I can describe the symptoms of the God complex very, very easily.

    ゴッド・コンプレックス(全能感ゆえの固定観念)

  • So the symptoms of the complex

    ゴッド・コンプレックスの症状は簡単に説明できます

  • are, no matter how complicated the problem,

    その固定観念の症候とは

  • you have an absolutely overwhelming belief

    問題がどれほど複雑であっても

  • that you are infallibly right in your solution.

    それを圧倒的で絶対的な信念を持って

  • Now Archie was a doctor,

    自分の解決策が間違いなく正しいと思うことです

  • so he hung around with doctors a lot.

    アーチーは医者でした

  • And doctors suffer from the God complex a lot.

    多くの医師と交流がありました

  • Now I'm an economist, I'm not a doctor,

    多くの医師がゴッド・コンプレックスに罹っています

  • but I see the God complex around me all the time

    まあ私は経済学者で医師ではありませんが

  • in my fellow economists.

    でも身の回りで 始終これを目にします

  • I see it in our business leaders.

    経済学者の仲間や

  • I see it in the politicians we vote for --

    経済界のリーダー達や

  • people who, in the face of an incredibly complicated world,

    我々が投票する政治家達にも見られます

  • are nevertheless absolutely convinced

    この驚くほど複雑化した世界を前にして

  • that they understand the way that the world works.

    それでもこの世の仕組みを理解できていると

  • And you know, with the future billions that we've been hearing about,

    頭から信じている人たちです

  • the world is simply far too complex

    これから 100億近い人が住もうというこの世界は

  • to understand in that way.

    あまりにも複雑すぎて

  • Well let me give you an example.

    そんなやり方では全然理解できません

  • Imagine for a moment

    例をあげましょう

  • that, instead of Tim Harford in front of you,

    しばらくの間

  • there was Hans Rosling presenting his graphs.

    ここにいるのはティム・ハフォードではなくて

  • You know Hans:

    ハンス・ロスリングがグラフを説明していると思ってください

  • the Mick Jagger of TED.

    あのハンスです

  • (Laughter)

    TED におけるミック・ジャガーですね

  • And he'd be showing you these amazing statistics,

    (笑)

  • these amazing animations.

    ハンスはあの素晴らしい統計と

  • And they are brilliant; it's wonderful work.

    アニメーションをお目にかけます

  • But a typical Hans Rosling graph:

    最高の内容です 素晴らしい

  • think for a moment, not what it shows,

    さて例のハンス・ロスリングのグラフですが

  • but think instead about what it leaves out.

    示している内容ではなくて

  • So it'll show you GDP per capita,

    そこで示されなかったことを考えてみてください

  • population, longevity,

    グラフが示しているのは ひとり当たりの GDP と

  • that's about it.

    人口と寿命

  • So three pieces of data for each country --

    それだけです

  • three pieces of data.

    国ごとに 3 種類のデータが揃っています

  • Three pieces of data is nothing.

    3 種のデータです

  • I mean, have a look at this graph.

    3 種なんて 何も無いようなものです

  • This is produced by the physicist Cesar Hidalgo.

    では こちらのグラフを見てください

  • He's at MIT.

    MIT の物理学者 シーザー・ヒダルゴが

  • Now you won't be able to understand a word of it,

    作ったグラフです

  • but this is what it looks like.

    パッと理解できるグラフではありませんが

  • Cesar has trolled the database

    こんなふうに見えるグラフです

  • of over 5,000 different products,

    5000種類の様々な製品の

  • and he's used techniques of network analysis

    データベースに対して

  • to interrogate this database

    ネットワーク解析の技術を適用して

  • and to graph relationships between the different products.

    このデータベースを調査しました

  • And it's wonderful, wonderful work.

    様々な製品間の関係を表したグラフです

  • You show all these interconnections, all these interrelations.

    これは実に素晴らしい研究です

  • And I think it'll be profoundly useful

    全ての繋がりと相関を示しています

  • in understanding how it is that economies grow.

    経済が成長して行くときの

  • Brilliant work.

    様子を理解する上で大変有用なことです

  • Cesar and I tried to write a piece for The New York Times Magazine

    際立つ研究です

  • explaining how this works.

    我々はニューヨーク・タイムズ・マガジンに

  • And what we learned

    この研究についての記事を書こうとしました

  • is Cesar's work is far too good to explain

    このシーザーの研究は素晴らしすぎて

  • in The New York Times Magazine.

    ニューヨーク・タイムズ・マガジンに

  • Five thousand products --

    収まりきらないことが判明しました

  • that's still nothing.

    5000 品目の製品は

  • Five thousand products --

    まだどうということはありません

  • imagine counting every product category

    5000 種類です

  • in Cesar Hidalgo's data.

    シーザーのデータに登場するすべての

  • Imagine you had one second

    項目を数え上げたとして

  • per product category.

    一項目に一秒かけて

  • In about the length of this session,

    読み上げていくと

  • you would have counted all 5,000.

    このセッションほどの時間で

  • Now imagine doing the same thing

    5000種全てを数え終わります

  • for every different type of product on sale in Walmart.

    同じことを

  • There are 100,000 there. It would take you all day.

    ウォールマートで売られている商品の全てに行うとすると

  • Now imagine trying to count

    10万点ありますから 丸一日かかるでしょう

  • every different specific product and service

    ではこんどは

  • on sale in a major economy

    大きな経済圏のあらゆる製品とサービスを

  • such as Tokyo, London or New York.

    数え上げるとしたらどうでしょう

  • It's even more difficult in Edinburgh

    例えば東京やロンドンやニューヨークです

  • because you have to count all the whisky and the tartan.

    エジンバラだと難しくなる点は

  • If you wanted to count every product and service

    ウィスキーとタータンも数えなければならないことです

  • on offer in New York --

    ニューヨークでの製品とサービスを

  • there are 10 billion of them --

    全て数え上げたら

  • it would take you 317 years.

    100億点になります

  • This is how complex the economy we've created is.

    317年かかることになります

  • And I'm just counting toasters here.

    われわれが作り上げた経済はこれほど複雑なのです

  • I'm not trying to solve the Middle East problem.

    ここでは商品の数を数えただけです

  • The complexity here is unbelievable.

    中東問題を解決を目指してはいないのに

  • And just a piece of context --

    信じがたいほどの複雑さです

  • the societies in which our brains evolved

    この見方で言うならー

  • had about 300 products and services.

    私たちの頭脳が進化してきた社会には

  • You could count them in five minutes.

    300 種の製品とサービスがありました

  • So this is the complexity of the world that surrounds us.

    つまり5分で数え上げられます

  • This perhaps is why

    こんな複雑な世界に私たちは囲まれています

  • we find the God complex so tempting.

    おそらくはそれゆえに

  • We tend to retreat and say, "We can draw a picture,

    ゴッド・コンプレックスに誘惑されるのです

  • we can post some graphs,

    押され気味になりながらも「概要がわかり

  • we get it, we understand how this works."

    なにかグラフも作れるだろう

  • And we don't.

    よしわかった その仕組みもわかった」と言うのです

  • We never do.

    でもわかっていません

  • Now I'm not trying to deliver a nihilistic message here.

    決してわかりはしません

  • I'm not trying to say we can't solve

    ニヒリズムを唱えているのではありません

  • complicated problems in a complicated world.

    複雑な世界の複雑な問題は解決できないと

  • We clearly can.

    言いたいわけではありません

  • But the way we solve them

    明らかに可能ですから

  • is with humility --

    しかし課題を解決する方法は

  • to abandon the God complex

    謙虚な取り組みによるものです

  • and to actually use a problem-solving technique that works.

    ゴッド・コンプレックスは捨てて

  • And we have a problem-solving technique that works.

    実際に有効な課題解決の方法を適用するのです

  • Now you show me

    そして有効な解決手法があります

  • a successful complex system,

    うまく機能しているー

  • and I will show you a system

    複雑なシステムがあればそれは

  • that has evolved through trial and error.

    試行錯誤の中でー

  • Here's an example.

    進化したシステムなのです

  • This baby was produced through trial and error.

    例えば

  • I realize that's an ambiguous statement.

    この赤ちゃんは試行錯誤から生まれました

  • Maybe I should clarify it.

    あいまいな言い方でしたね

  • This baby is a human body: it evolved.

    明確にしましょう

  • What is evolution?

    この赤ちゃんという肉体は進化の結果です

  • Over millions of years, variation and selection,

    進化とは何でしょうか?

  • variation and selection --

    何百万年にもわたる変化と選択

  • trial and error,

    変化と選択

  • trial and error.

    試行と錯誤

  • And it's not just biological systems

    試行と錯誤の繰り返しです

  • that produce miracles through trial and error.

    そして試行錯誤が奇跡を生み出すのは

  • You could use it in an industrial context.

    生体系に限った話ではありません

  • So let's say you wanted to make detergent.

    産業応用にも適用できるのです

  • Let's say you're Unilever

    例えば 洗剤を作りたいとしましょう

  • and you want to make detergent in a factory near Liverpool.

    ユニリーバみたいに

  • How do you do it?

    リバプール近郊の工場で洗剤を製造しようとするとき

  • Well you have this great big tank full of liquid detergent.

    どうやりますか?

  • You pump it at a high pressure through a nozzle.

    こんな大きなタンク一杯に液体の洗剤を用意します

  • You create a spray of detergent.

    高圧をかけてノズルから噴き出し

  • Then the spray dries. It turns into powder.

    洗剤を霧状にします

  • It falls to the floor.

    霧はすぐに乾燥して粉になります

  • You scoop it up. You put it in cardboard boxes.

    粉は下にたまります

  • You sell it at a supermarket.

    それをかき集めて箱に詰めます

  • You make lots of money.

    スーパーで売ると

  • How do you design that nozzle?

    立派な売上が得られます

  • It turns out to be very important.

    そのノズルをどう設計しましょうか?

  • Now if you ascribe to the God complex,

    これが大変重要だとわかったのです

  • what you do is you find yourself a little God.

    ゴッド・コンプレックスの考え方に従うなら

  • You find yourself a mathematician; you find yourself a physicist --

    ちょっとした神を探さなければなりません

  • somebody who understands the dynamics of this fluid.

    数学者や物理学者だとか

  • And he will, or she will,

    液体の力学をわかる人を自分で探し出して

  • calculate the optimal design of the nozzle.

    その人に

  • Now Unilever did this and it didn't work --

    ノズルの最適形状を計算してもらいます

  • too complicated.

    ユニリーバもそうやって失敗しました

  • Even this problem, too complicated.

    複雑すぎたのです

  • But the geneticist Professor Steve Jones

    こんな問題でも複雑すぎるのです

  • describes how Unilever actually did solve this problem --

    しかし遺伝学者のスティーブ・ジョーンズ教授は

  • trial and error,

    ユニリーバがこの問題をどう解決したか説明しています

  • variation and selection.

    試行錯誤です

  • You take a nozzle

    変化と選択です

  • and you create 10 random variations on the nozzle.

    まずノズルを用意します

  • You try out all 10; you keep the one that works best.

    ランダムに 10通りの変形をさせて

  • You create 10 variations on that one.

    この10個のノズルを試して 最良の一つを選びます

  • You try out all 10. You keep the one that works best.

    それをまた10通りに変化させ

  • You try out 10 variations on that one.

    全部を試して一番良いのを選びます

  • You see how this works, right?

    そしてまた10通りを試します

  • And after 45 generations,

    どうやるかおわかりですね

  • you have this incredible nozzle.

    こうして 45 世代を繰り返した後で

  • It looks a bit like a chess piece --

    このおどろくべきノズルができました

  • functions absolutely brilliantly.

    チェスの駒に似た感じです