Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hey guys, I'm Kyle from The Distilled Man.

    やあ、俺はカイルだ 蒸留屋の

  • And up next we're going to be talking about table manners

    次はテーブルマナーについてです

  • and how to avoid embarrassing yourself when you dine out with other people.

    と、人と食事をするときに恥ずかしくない方法を紹介しています。

  • When you hear the words manners or etiquette,

    マナーやマナーという言葉を聞くと

  • I know sometimes you might just think of rules you blindly have to follow for the heck of it.

    盲目的に守らなければならないルールを考えることもあるだろうが

  • But actually that's not the case.

    しかし、実際にはそうではありません。

  • At their core manners are just being considerate and respectful to the people around you.

    その核心にあるマナーとは、あなたの周りの人々に思いやりと敬意を持っているだけです。

  • Table manners are particularly important because,

    テーブルマナーは特に重要だからです。

  • well let's face it there's a lot more ways to gross someone out when you're eating with them.

    仝それにしても、このようなことをしているときには、誰かをキモくさせる方法がたくさんありますね。

  • You know, when you're slurping and chomping and burping and splattering...

    スラスラと喉を鳴らして 喉を鳴らして 吐いて 飛び散っている時に...

  • Versus when you're just like sitting next to them on a train reading a newspaper.

    電車の中で隣に座って新聞を読んでいるようなものです。

  • Because of that table manners have always been a good "tell" about someone's overall refinement,

    そのため、テーブルマナーは、常に誰かの全体的な洗練されたことを伝える良い "教えて "されています。

  • their upbringing and their sort of sensitivity and kind of self-awareness around other people.

    育ってきた環境や、他の人の周りでの感受性や自意識のようなものがあるのです。

  • So my thought is even if you don't practice impeccable table manners at home,

    だから、私の考えは、あなたが家で非の打ちどころのないテーブルマナーを実践していなくても、です。

  • it is important to know how to behave properly for those important occasions.

    そのような大切な場面での正しい振る舞い方を知っておくことが大切です。

  • Today we're going to be talking about some easy to follow guidelines

    今日は、いくつかの簡単なガイドラインに従うための話をしようとしています。

  • that will help keep your table manners on point throughout an entire meal.

    これは、全体の食事を通してポイントであなたのテーブルマナーを維持するのに役立ちます。

  • Sitting down at the table.

    テーブルに座る。

  • So you're just about to sit down at the table, that a great time for you to silence your phone and put it away.

    だから、あなたはちょうどあなたの携帯電話を沈黙させ、それを片付けるための素晴らしい時間、テーブルに座ろうとしています。

  • You don't want to be that guy whose phone is going off during a nice dinner.

    あなたは、素敵なディナーの間にその携帯電話がオフになっている男になりたくない。

  • The other thing you want to do is make sure to wait for everyone to gather around the table.

    あとは、テーブルを囲んでみんなが集まるのを待つようにしましょう。

  • To about to be seated before you sit down yourself.

    自分が座る前に着席しようとしています。

  • And you may want to take a cue with the host or hostess

    そして、ホストやホステスに合図をしたくなるかもしれない

  • The first thing you do when you sit down is generally put your napkin on your lap.

    座ったらまず最初にすることは、一般的には膝の上にナプキンを置くことです。

  • And in really formal settings, you'd actually wait for an indication from the host or hostess to do this,

    また、本当にフォーマルな場では、ホストやホステスからの指示を待つことになります。

  • but in most setting you're probably safest just to put your napkin on your lap

    しかし、ほとんどの設定では、あなたの膝の上にナプキンを置くことがおそらく最も安全です。

  • when you first sit down so you don't forget.

    最初に座ったときに忘れないように。

  • Of course that should never go in your shirt, you should keep it on your lap.

    もちろんそれはシャツの中に入ってはいけない、膝の上に置いておくべきだ。

  • But your napkin is your friend, so feel free to use it throughout the meal

    しかし、ナプキンはあなたの友人ですので、食事中に自由に使用することができます。

  • to blot your mouth and keep it clean.

    を使って口の中を滲ませて清潔に保つことができます。

  • Body Language

    ボディランゲージ

  • When you're sitting down your posture should be upright.

    あなたが座っているとき、あなたの姿勢は直立している必要があります。

  • You should try to avoid slouching or leaning way back on your chair.

    椅子の上では、スレッ チをしたり、背もたれに寄りかかったりしないようにする必要があります。

  • Keeping your elbows off the table.

    肘をテーブルから離すこと。

  • So this is kind of a misunderstood rule.

    これは一種の誤解されたルールなんですね。

  • Of course, it isn't acceptable to put your elbows on the table while your eating

    もちろん、食べている間にテーブルの上に肘を置くことは許容されません。

  • and in general you want to kind of keep your free hand on your lap.

    そして一般的には、あなたの膝の上に自由な手を置いておきたいと思っています。

  • While you''re eating, but it is actually acceptable to put your elbows on the table

    あなたが食べている間、しかし、それは実際にはテーブルの上にあなたの肘を置くことが許容されています。

  • in between courses when you're not eating.

    食事をしていない時は、コースの合間に。

  • And particularly after the meal if you're just enjoying conversation with the other diners,

    特に食後は、他の食堂の人たちとの会話を楽しんでいる場合は、特にそうですね。

  • you can put your elbows on the table, lean in and it's totally fine.

    肘をテーブルの上に置いて、寄りかかって、それは全く問題ありません。

  • The Place Setting

    場所の設定

  • Oh, the place setting!

    あ、場所の設定!?

  • Nothing gives people greater anxiety than the place setting.

    場所の設定ほど人に不安を与えるものはない。

  • You sit down and there's all these glasses and plates and implements.

    座ってみると、そこにはグラスやお皿や道具がずらりと並んでいます。

  • You don't know what's going on, it's totally overwhelming.

    あなたは何が起こっているのかわからない、それは完全に圧倒されています。

  • Now the first thing that you want to figure out is, where's my bread plate and where's my water glass.

    さて、まず最初に考えたいのは、パン皿はどこにあるか、水のコップはどこにあるか、ということです。

  • Because you don't want to be like sipping off someone else's glass or stealing someone else's bread.

    誰かのグラスをすすり落としたり、誰かのパンを盗んだりするようなことはしたくないからです。

  • So I like to use this trick that my friend Dave showed me that's really handy.

    だから、友人のデイブが教えてくれたこのトリックを使うのが好きです。

  • Just remember "b" and "d".

    B」と「D」だけ覚えておいてください。

  • So, b for bread and d for drink.

    だから、Bはパン、Dは飲み物。

  • And that kind of always tells you what side everything is on.

    そして、それはいつもどの側にあるかを教えてくれます。

  • When it comes to understanding which glass is for what, honestly you shouldn't have to worry about it.

    それはガラスが何のためのものであるかを理解することになると、正直なところ、あなたはそれについて心配する必要はありません。

  • Because most likely when you get there to the table your water glass is probably already filled.

    なぜなら、あなたがテーブルに着いたときには、おそらくあなたの水のグラスはすでに満たされている可能性が高いからです。

  • Or it will be pretty obvious which one the glass is.

    それかグラスがどっちなのかかなりバレバレになります。

  • And if you do have multiple wine glasses,

    そして、複数のワイングラスをお持ちの方は

  • generally that means you're probably gonna be in a place that has servers

    一般的には、あなたがおそらくサーバーを持っている場所にいることを意味します。

  • or a sommelier and then the server sommelier is going to be the one who's going to fill up your glass anyway.

    またはソムリエと、サーバーソムリエは、とにかくあなたのグラスを埋めるために起こっている1つになるでしょう'。

  • So you don't need to really think about it.

    だから、本当に考える必要はありません。

  • When it comes to silverware, there's something you've got to understand.

    それが銀食器になると、あなたが理解しなければならないことがあります。

  • First of all, if the person who laid it out actually knows what they're doing,

    まず、それをレイアウトした人が実際に何をしているかを知っている場合。

  • then each utensil should be laid to the order that the dishes should be presented.

    そして、それぞれの器は、料理が提示されるべき順序に並べる必要があります。

  • You know anything that is served on a flat plate should be eaten with a fork.

    平皿に盛られたものは何でもフォークで食べるべきだと知っているはずだ。

  • And anything that's served in a bowl should be eaten with a spoon.

    そして、器に盛られたものはスプーンで食べるようにしています。

  • The only thing that you really need to remember is that you start with utensils closest to you

    本当に覚えておかなければならないことは、あなたが最も身近な道具から始めることです。

  • and work from your outside in.

    とあなたの外からの仕事。

  • Those utensils on the top, above your plate are for dessert don't worry about them for now.

    皿の上の上にある道具はデザート用のもので、今は気にしないでください。

  • On your left side, you're probably going to have some forks.

    左側にはフォークがあるでしょう。

  • On your right side, you're probably going to have some knives some spoon or two.

    右側には、ナイフやスプーンなどを持っているでしょう。

  • And then maybe mincer fork looking thing, that's a seafood fork, essentially.

    そして、ミンサーフォークのようなものは、シーフードフォークですね。

  • Starting the Meal

    食事の開始

  • So as much as you want to tear into your food, because you're hungry, when it first arrives in front of you.

    だから、あなたはそれが最初にあなたの目の前に到着したときに、あなたが空腹だから、あなたの食べ物に涙したいのと同じくらい。

  • You've got to wait until everyone else is served and in really formal dinners

    あなたは、他の人が提供されるまで待たなければならないし、本当にフォーマルなディナーでは

  • you would actually wait to get a cue from the host or hostess.

    あなたは実際にはホストやホステスからの合図を待つでしょう。

  • But usually you're safe if everyone is served.

    しかし、通常は全員がサービスされていれば安全です。

  • In the western world, there are sort of two acceptable ways to hold your fork and knife.

    西洋の世界では、フォークとナイフの持ち方には2つの許容範囲があります。

  • There's the American Style and the Continental Style.

    アメリカンスタイルとコンチネンタルスタイルがあります。

  • With the American Style, you hold the fork with the dominant hand, kind of like a pencil.

    アメリカンスタイルでは、フォークを利き手で持ち、鉛筆のようなものです。

  • And then when it comes to cut something, you switch hands and that's why this is sometimes called the zigzag style, also.

    そして、何かを切るときには、手を入れ替えて、これがジグザグスタイルと呼ばれる理由です。

  • And you use your dominant hand to cut with the knife.

    利き手を使って包丁で切るんですね。

  • Cut a single bite of food and switch the fork back to your dominant hand to take a bite.

    一口分の食べ物を切り、フォークを利き手に戻して一口食べるように切り替える。

  • And while you're doing that if you want to set the knife down you can place it at the top of your plate.

    そうしている間に、ナイフを下に置きたい場合は、お皿の上に置くことができます。

  • With the blade facing down towards you.

    刃を下に向けて

  • With the Continental Style, you keep your fork in your non dominant hand

    コンチネンタルスタイルでは、フォークを利き手以外の手に持ちます。

  • and then you still cut with your dominant hand but you don't switch them.

    そして、あなたはまだあなたの支配的な手でカットしていますが、あなたはそれらを切り替えることはありません。

  • According to Emily Post, either way is fine.

    エミリー・ポストによると、どちらでも構わないとのこと。

  • This is actually what I do because it's a little bit easier, you're switching back and forth.

    これは実際に私がやっていることですが、それは少し簡単で、あなたが前後に切り替えているからです。

  • And of course when you're eating with your fork and not cutting, you should be keep your other hand on your lap.

    もちろん、フォークで食べている時は、もう片方の手は膝の上に置いておきましょう。

  • And remember don't reach across the table,

    そして、テーブルを横切って手を伸ばさないことを忘れないでください。

  • if something is close enough to you that you can grab it and you're not reaching over another diner,

    何かがあなたの近くにある場合は、それをつかむことができ、あなたが他の食堂に手を伸ばしていないことを十分に近いです。

  • you can feel free to reach out and get it.

    気軽に手を伸ばして手に入れてみてはいかがでしょうか。

  • But otherwise you're going to have to ask someone else to pass it to you.

    でも、そうでなければ誰かに譲ってもらわないといけません。

  • "Can you please pass the salt."

    "塩を渡してくれないか?"

  • And on that note if someone asks you to pass the salt,

    もし誰かが塩を渡すように言われたら

  • you always give them the pepper as well and vice versa.

    胡椒もいつも与えているし、その逆もあります。

  • Finger Foods

    フィンガーフード

  • Yes, believe it or not, it is okay actually to eat certain foods with your fingers when you're at a formal dinner.

    仝それはそれでいいのですが、それはあなたが正式な夕食であるときにあなたの指で特定の食品を食べるために実際には大丈夫です。

  • You know obvious finger foods like corn on the cob, chicken wings

    コブの上のトウモロコシ、手羽先のような明らかなフィンガーフードを知っています。

  • or ribs, or pizza, or tacos, you can eat with your fingers but

    それともリブかピザかタコスか、指で食べることはできますが

  • you have to use your judgement, if it does look like it's going to be really messy maybe try to use a fork if you can.

    あなたはあなたの判断を使用する必要があります、それはそれが本当に面倒になるように見える場合は、多分あなたができる場合は、フォークを使用してみてください。

  • Chewing and Talking

    噛んで話す

  • You probably already know that you're not supposed to talk with your mouth full of food.

    口いっぱいに食べ物を口にして話してはいけないことは、もう知っているでしょう。

Hey guys, I'm Kyle from The Distilled Man.

やあ、俺はカイルだ 蒸留屋の

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

A2 初級 日本語 テーブル フォーク マナー グラス スタイル ナプキン

テーブルマナー101:基本的な食事のマナー

  • 374 30
    Eva Liao に公開 2018 年 04 月 29 日
動画の中の単語