Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So, security is two different things:

    翻訳: Keiichi Kudo 校正: Akiko Hicks

  • it's a feeling, and it's a reality.

    セキュリティには 2 つの側面があります

  • And they're different.

    感情と現実です

  • You could feel secure even if you're not.

    両者は異なるものです

  • And you can be secure

    実際に安全ではなくとも

  • even if you don't feel it.

    安全だと感じることができます

  • Really, we have two separate concepts

    安全だと感じなくても

  • mapped onto the same word.

    安全であることもあります

  • And what I want to do in this talk is to split them apart --

    二つの別々の概念が

  • figuring out when they diverge and how they converge.

    安全という一つの言葉に対応付けてられています

  • And language is actually a problem here.

    本日私がお話ししたいことは

  • There aren't a lot of good words

    感情と現実を区別し

  • for the concepts we're going to talk about.

    どのような時に 別々の概念に別れ

  • So if you look at security from economic terms,

    どう一つに収束するかです

  • it's a trade-off.

    ここでは言葉が問題となります

  • Every time you get some security, you're always trading off something.

    これからお話しする概念に則した

  • Whether this is a personal decision --

    良い言葉があまりないのです

  • whether you're going to install a burglar alarm in your home --

    安全を

  • or a national decision,

    経済学の言葉で表現するなら

  • where you're going to invade a foreign country --

    「トレードオフ」となります

  • you're going to trade off something: money or time, convenience, capabilities,

    安全を得るときはいつも

  • maybe fundamental liberties.

    何かをトレードオフしています

  • And the question to ask when you look at a security anything

    個人的な判断で

  • is not whether this makes us safer,

    自宅に防犯ベルを設置するとき

  • but whether it's worth the trade-off.

    国家的な判断で外国に侵攻するとき

  • You've heard in the past several years, the world is safer

    何かをトレードオフすることになります

  • because Saddam Hussein is not in power.

    それはお金 時間 利便性 機能性

  • That might be true, but it's not terribly relevant.

    あるいは根本的な自由かもしれません

  • The question is: Was it worth it?

    安全を考えるときに問うべきは

  • And you can make your own decision,

    それが自身をより安全にするかではなく

  • and then you'll decide whether the invasion was worth it.

    トレードオフするに値するかです

  • That's how you think about security: in terms of the trade-off.

    ここ数年でこんなことを耳にしたでしょう

  • Now, there's often no right or wrong here.

    サダム・フセインが権力を振るっていないので世界はより安全だと

  • Some of us have a burglar alarm system at home and some of us don't.

    真実かもしれませんが関連性はごく僅かでしょう

  • And it'll depend on where we live,

    問うべきは その価値があったか ということです

  • whether we live alone or have a family,

    これは個人個人で結論が出せます

  • how much cool stuff we have,

    侵攻するに値したか 自分なりに判断するのです

  • how much we're willing to accept the risk of theft.

    これが安全を考える方法です

  • In politics also, there are different opinions.

    トレードオフという観点を用いるのです

  • A lot of times, these trade-offs are about more than just security,

    この判断に特に正しい答えはありません

  • and I think that's really important.

    自宅に防犯ベルを設置している人もいれば

  • Now, people have a natural intuition about these trade-offs.

    そうでない人もいます

  • We make them every day.

    住んでいる地域

  • Last night in my hotel room, when I decided to double-lock the door,

    一人暮らしか家族と住んでいるか

  • or you in your car when you drove here;

    どんな凄いものを所有しているか

  • when we go eat lunch

    窃盗のリスクをどの程度

  • and decide the food's not poison and we'll eat it.

    許容するかによるでしょう

  • We make these trade-offs again and again,

    政治でも

  • multiple times a day.

    さまざまな見解があります

  • We often won't even notice them.

    多くの場合 トレードオフは

  • They're just part of being alive; we all do it.

    安全に関するものに留まりません

  • Every species does it.

    これは重要なことです

  • Imagine a rabbit in a field, eating grass.

    人間はこういったトレードオフに対して

  • And the rabbit sees a fox.

    直感を持っており

  • That rabbit will make a security trade-off:

    日々それを使っています

  • "Should I stay, or should I flee?"

    昨晩ホテルの部屋で

  • And if you think about it,

    ドアを二重に施錠すると判断したとき

  • the rabbits that are good at making that trade-off

    皆さんがここまで運転してきたとき

  • will tend to live and reproduce,

    ランチに行き

  • and the rabbits that are bad at it

    食べ物に毒が混入していないと判断し食べるとき

  • will get eaten or starve.

    私たちはこういったトレードオフを

  • So you'd think

    一日に何回も判断しています

  • that us, as a successful species on the planet -- you, me, everybody --

    あまり意識することはないでしょう

  • would be really good at making these trade-offs.

    生存活動の一部に過ぎません 皆やっていることです

  • Yet it seems, again and again, that we're hopelessly bad at it.

    あらゆる種が行っていることです

  • And I think that's a fundamentally interesting question.

    野原で草を食べているウサギを想像してください

  • I'll give you the short answer.

    そのウサギはキツネを見つけます

  • The answer is, we respond to the feeling of security

    するとウサギは安全のトレードオフをするでしょう

  • and not the reality.

    「留まるべきか 逃げるべきか」

  • Now, most of the time, that works.

    こうして考えてみると

  • Most of the time,

    トレードオフの判断に長けたウサギは

  • feeling and reality are the same.

    生き延びて繁殖するでしょう

  • Certainly that's true for most of human prehistory.

    そうでないウサギは

  • We've developed this ability

    捕食されたり餓死するでしょう

  • because it makes evolutionary sense.

    では

  • One way to think of it is that we're highly optimized

    地球で成功している種である

  • for risk decisions

    皆さん 私 全員が

  • that are endemic to living in small family groups

    トレードオフの判断に長けていると考えるかもしれません

  • in the East African Highlands in 100,000 BC.

    にも関わらず

  • 2010 New York, not so much.

    私たちは絶望的に下手なようです

  • Now, there are several biases in risk perception.

    これは非常に興味深い疑問だと思います

  • A lot of good experiments in this.

    端的な回答をお出ししましょう

  • And you can see certain biases that come up again and again.

    私たちは安全の感覚に対応しているのであり

  • I'll give you four.

    安全の実態に反応しているのではないということです

  • We tend to exaggerate spectacular and rare risks

    多くの場合これは有効です

  • and downplay common risks --

    多くの場合

  • so, flying versus driving.

    感覚と実態は同じです

  • The unknown is perceived to be riskier than the familiar.

    先史時代においては

  • One example would be:

    まさしく真実でした

  • people fear kidnapping by strangers,

    私たちが感覚的に反応する能力を発達させてきたのは

  • when the data supports that kidnapping by relatives is much more common.

    進化的に正しかったからです

  • This is for children.

    一つの解釈は

  • Third, personified risks are perceived to be greater

    少数のグループで生活するときに

  • than anonymous risks.

    必要とされるリスク判断に

  • So, Bin Laden is scarier because he has a name.

    極めて適合していたということです

  • And the fourth is:

    これは紀元前10万年の東アフリカ高地でのことであり

  • people underestimate risks in situations they do control

    2010 年のニューヨークではまた別です

  • and overestimate them in situations they don't control.

    リスクの認知にはいくつものバイアスがかかるもので

  • So once you take up skydiving or smoking,

    それについては数多くの研究があります

  • you downplay the risks.

    特定のバイアスは繰り返し現れるものです

  • If a risk is thrust upon you -- terrorism is a good example --

    ここでは 4 つ紹介したいと思います

  • you'll overplay it,

    私たちは劇的なリスクや珍しいリスクを誇大化し

  • because you don't feel like it's in your control.

    一般的なリスクを過小評価しがちです

  • There are a bunch of other of these cognitive biases,

    例えば飛行機と車での移動の比較です

  • that affect our risk decisions.

    未知のリスクは

  • There's the availability heuristic,

    既知のリスクより大きく捉えられます

  • which basically means we estimate the probability of something

    例えば

  • by how easy it is to bring instances of it to mind.

    人々は見知らぬ人による誘拐を恐れますが

  • So you can imagine how that works.

    データによると顔見知りによる誘拐の方が断然多いのです

  • If you hear a lot about tiger attacks, there must be a lot of tigers around.

    これは子供の場合です

  • You don't hear about lion attacks, there aren't a lot of lions around.

    第三に 名前を持つものによるリスクは

  • This works, until you invent newspapers,

    匿名によるリスクより大きく捉えられます

  • because what newspapers do is repeat again and again

    ビン・ラディンは名を持つがゆえにより恐れられるということです

  • rare risks.

    第四に 人々は

  • I tell people: if it's in the news, don't worry about it,

    自分でコントロールできる状況での

  • because by definition, news is something that almost never happens.

    リスクを過小評価し

  • (Laughter)

    そうでない状況でのリスクを過大評価します

  • When something is so common, it's no longer news.

    スカイダイビングや喫煙をする人は

  • Car crashes, domestic violence --

    そのリスクを実際より低く捉えます

  • those are the risks you worry about.

    テロが良い例ですが そういったリスクに曝されると

  • We're also a species of storytellers.

    それを過大評価します 自分でコントロールできないと感じるからです

  • We respond to stories more than data.

    他にも私たちのリスク判断に影響する

  • And there's some basic innumeracy going on.

    多数の認知バイアスが存在します

  • I mean, the joke "One, two, three, many" is kind of right.

    利用可能性ヒューリスティックというものがあります

  • We're really good at small numbers.

    これは基本的に

  • One mango, two mangoes, three mangoes,

    想像の し易さから

  • 10,000 mangoes, 100,000 mangoes --

    その可能性を推測するというものです

  • it's still more mangoes you can eat before they rot.

    どういうことかお話ししましょう

  • So one half, one quarter, one fifth -- we're good at that.

    トラの襲撃をよく耳にする場合 周辺にはトラが沢山いるはずです

  • One in a million, one in a billion --

    ライオンの襲撃を耳にしないなら 周辺にライオンはあまりいないでしょう

  • they're both almost never.

    こう考えられるのも新聞が出回るまでです

  • So we have trouble with the risks that aren't very common.

    なぜなら新聞とは

  • And what these cognitive biases do

    繰り返し繰り返し

  • is they act as filters between us and reality.

    希なリスクを記すものだからです

  • And the result is that feeling and reality get out of whack,

    ニュースになるくらいなら心配はいらないと私はみんなに言っています

  • they get different.

    なぜなら定義によれば

  • Now, you either have a feeling -- you feel more secure than you are,

    ニュースとはほぼ起こらない出来事のことだからです

  • there's a false sense of security.

    (笑)

  • Or the other way, and that's a false sense of insecurity.

    ある出来事が一般的なら それはもはやニュースではないのです

  • I write a lot about "security theater,"

    自動車事故や家庭内暴力

  • which are products that make people feel secure,

    皆さんが心配するリスクはこういったものです

  • but don't actually do anything.

    また私たちは物語る種です

  • There's no real word for stuff that makes us secure,

    データより物語に敏感です

  • but doesn't make us feel secure.

    また根本的な数量に対する感覚も欠けています

  • Maybe it's what the CIA is supposed to do for us.

    「一つ 二つ 三つ たくさん」はある意味正しいということです

  • So back to economics.

    私たちは 小さい数にはとても強いです

  • If economics, if the market, drives security,

    一つのマンゴー 二つのマンゴー 三つのマンゴー

  • and if people make trade-offs based on the feeling of security,

    一万のマンゴー 十万のマンゴー

  • then the smart thing for companies to do for the economic incentives

    食べきる前に腐ってしまうほどの数です

  • is to make people feel secure.

    二分の一 四分の一 五分の一 こういうのも得意です

  • And there are two ways to do this.

    百万分の一 十億分の一

  • One, you can make people actually secure

    どちらも「ほぼありえない」です

  • and hope they notice.

    このように 私たちは

  • Or two, you can make people just feel secure

    珍しいリスクというものが苦手です

  • and hope they don't notice.

    そしてこの認知バイアスは

  • Right?

    私たちと実態の間のフィルターとして働きます

  • So what makes people notice?

    その結果

  • Well, a couple of things:

    感覚と実態が狂います

  • understanding of the security,

    異なるものとなるのです

  • of the risks, the threats,

    皆さんは実際より安全だと感じることがあります

  • the countermeasures, how they work.

    偽りの感覚です

  • But if you know stuff, you're more likely

    あるいは

  • to have your feelings match reality.

    偽りの不安感もあります

  • Enough real-world examples helps.

    私は「セキュリティシアター」

  • We all know the crime rate in our neighborhood,

    つまり人々に安心感を与えつつも

  • because we live there, and we get a feeling about it

    実効を持たないものについて沢山書いています

  • that basically matches reality.

    私たちに安全を提供しつつも

  • Security theater is exposed

    安心にはさせないというものを示す言葉はありません

  • when it's obvious that it's not working properly.

    CIA に是非やってもらいたいことです

  • OK. So what makes people not notice?

    では経済の話に戻りましょう

  • Well, a poor understanding.

    もし経済が 市場が 安全を促進するならば