Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So, a big question that we're facing now

    翻訳: Hidehito Sumitomo 校正: Tamami Inoue

  • and have been for quite a number of years now:

    私達は長年にわたり 大きな問題に直面しています

  • are we at risk of a nuclear attack?

    私達は長年にわたり 大きな問題に直面しています

  • Now, there's a bigger question

    それは核攻撃を受ける可能性です

  • that's probably actually more important than that,

    そしてさらに重要かもしれないのが

  • is the notion of permanently eliminating

    そしてさらに重要かもしれないのが

  • the possibility of a nuclear attack,

    核の脅威を永久に 排除できるかということです

  • eliminating the threat altogether.

    核の脅威を永久に 排除できるかということです

  • And I would like to make a case to you that

    核の脅威を永久に 排除できるかということです

  • over the years since we first developed atomic weaponry,

    米国が世界初の原子爆弾を 開発して以来

  • until this very moment,

    米国が世界初の原子爆弾を 開発して以来

  • we've actually lived in a dangerous nuclear world

    米国が世界初の原子爆弾を 開発して以来

  • that's characterized by two phases,

    人々は核の脅威に さらされながら生きてきました

  • which I'm going to go through with you right now.

    人々は核の脅威に さらされながら生きてきました

  • First of all, we started off the nuclear age in 1945.

    そのことを2つの時期に分けて説明します

  • The United States had developed a couple of atomic weapons

    1945年に核時代が始まります

  • through the Manhattan Project,

    米国はマンハッタン計画を通して 2つの原子爆弾を開発しました

  • and the idea was very straightforward:

    米国はマンハッタン計画を通して 2つの原子爆弾を開発しました

  • we would use the power of the atom

    その発想は非常に単純です 原子爆弾を利用すれば

  • to end the atrocities and the horror

    その発想は非常に単純です 原子爆弾を利用すれば

  • of this unending World War II

    第二次世界大戦の残虐行為と恐怖を やっと終わらせられる というものです

  • that we'd been involved in in Europe and in the Pacific.

    第二次世界大戦の残虐行為と恐怖を やっと終わらせられる というものです

  • And in 1945,

    第二次世界大戦の残虐行為と恐怖を やっと終わらせられる というものです

  • we were the only nuclear power.

    唯一の核保有国だった米国は 2つの原子爆弾を日本に落としました

  • We had a few nuclear weapons,

    唯一の核保有国だった米国は 2つの原子爆弾を日本に落としました

  • two of which we dropped on Japan, in Hiroshima,

    唯一の核保有国だった米国は 2つの原子爆弾を日本に落としました

  • a few days later in Nagasaki, in August 1945,

    1945年8月 1つを広島に その数日後 もう1つを長崎に投下したのです

  • killing about 250,000 people between those two.

    1945年8月 1つを広島に その数日後 もう1つを長崎に投下したのです

  • And for a few years,

    2つの原子爆弾で 約25万人が死亡しました

  • we were the only nuclear power on Earth.

    その後 数年間は 米国が唯一の核保有国でした

  • But by 1949, the Soviet Union had decided

    その後 数年間は 米国が唯一の核保有国でした

  • it was unacceptable to have us as the only nuclear power,

    しかし1949年 ソビエト連邦は

  • and they began to match what the United States had developed.

    「米国だけ核を持つのは容認できない」とし 米国との核開発競争を始めました

  • And from 1949 to 1985

    「米国だけ核を持つのは容認できない」とし 米国との核開発競争を始めました

  • was an extraordinary time

    1949年から1985年は核兵器を 積み上げていく異様な時代でした

  • of a buildup of a nuclear arsenal

    1949年から1985年は核兵器を 積み上げていく異様な時代でした

  • that no one could possibly have imagined

    1949年から1985年は核兵器を 積み上げていく異様な時代でした

  • back in the 1940s.

    このような時代になることを 1940年代に 誰が想像したでしょうか

  • So by 1985 -- each of those red bombs up here

    このような時代になることを 1940年代に 誰が想像したでしょうか

  • is equivalent of a thousands warheads --

    この赤い印は1つ当たり 1000発分の核弾頭を示しています

  • the world had

    この赤い印は1つ当たり 1000発分の核弾頭を示しています

  • 65,000 nuclear warheads,

    1985年まで 世界には 6万5千発の核弾頭がありました

  • and seven members of something

    1985年まで 世界には 6万5千発の核弾頭がありました

  • that came to be known as the "nuclear club."

    そして核を保有する7か国が 「核クラブ」として知られるようになりました

  • And it was an extraordinary time,

    そして核を保有する7か国が 「核クラブ」として知られるようになりました

  • and I am going to go through some of the mentality

    異常な時代です

  • that we -- that Americans and the rest of the world were experiencing.

    当時の人々はどんな精神状態で この時代を過ごしたのでしょうか

  • But I want to just point out to you that 95 percent

    当時の人々はどんな精神状態で この時代を過ごしたのでしょうか

  • of the nuclear weapons at any particular time

    ここで注意しなければならないのは 1985年以降 核兵器の95%が

  • since 1985 -- going forward, of course --

    ここで注意しなければならないのは 1985年以降 核兵器の95%が

  • were part of the arsenals

    米国とソ連のものだということです

  • of the United States and the Soviet Union.

    米国とソ連のものだったということです

  • After 1985, and before the break up of the Soviet Union,

    米国とソ連のものだったということです

  • we began to disarm

    1985年から ソ連崩壊までの間に 核武装解除が開始されます

  • from a nuclear point of view.

    1985年から ソ連崩壊までの間に 核武装解除が開始されます

  • We began to counter-proliferate,

    1985年から ソ連崩壊までの間に 核武装解除が開始されます

  • and we dropped the number of nuclear warheads in the world

    世界に存在する核弾頭が 約2万1千発まで削減されました

  • to about a total of 21,000.

    世界に存在する核弾頭が 約2万1千発まで削減されました

  • It's a very difficult number to deal with,

    世界に存在する核弾頭が 約2万1千発まで削減されました

  • because what we've done is

    この数字は非常にやっかいです 核を「引退」させただけで

  • we've quote unquote "decommissioned" some of the warheads.

    この数字は非常にやっかいです 核を「引退」させただけで

  • They're still probably usable. They could be "re-commissioned,"

    「復帰」させれば 再び使用できるからです

  • but the way they count things, which is very complicated,

    「復帰」させれば 再び使用できるからです

  • we think we have about a third

    この計算方法によると 核が3分の1に削減されたことになります

  • of the nuclear weapons we had before.

    この計算方法によると 核が3分の1に削減されたことになります

  • But we also, in that period of time,

    この計算方法によると 核が3分の1に削減されたことになります

  • added two more members to the nuclear club:

    しかしここで新たに2か国が 核クラブに参入しました

  • Pakistan and North Korea.

    しかしここで新たに2か国が 核クラブに参入しました

  • So we stand today with a still fully armed nuclear arsenal

    パキスタンと北朝鮮です

  • among many countries around the world,

    米国が現在も 核武装しているのはこのためです

  • but a very different set of circumstances.

    米国が現在も 核武装しているのはこのためです

  • So I'm going to talk about

    米国が現在も 核武装しているのはこのためです

  • a nuclear threat story in two chapters.

    これから2章にわたり 核の脅威についてお話しします

  • Chapter one is 1949 to 1991,

    これから2章にわたり 核の脅威についてお話しします

  • when the Soviet Union broke up,

    第1章は1949年から1991年 ソ連が崩壊するまで

  • and what we were dealing with, at that point and through those years,

    第1章は1949年から1991年 ソ連が崩壊するまで

  • was a superpowers' nuclear arms race.

    超大国同士の 核軍拡競争が続いていた時期です

  • It was characterized by

    超大国同士の 核軍拡競争が続いていた時期です

  • a nation-versus-nation,

    国家対国家の 非常に危険な睨み合いです

  • very fragile standoff.

    国家対国家の 非常に危険な睨み合いです

  • And basically,

    国家対国家の 非常に危険な睨み合いです

  • we lived for all those years,

    現在もそうだという人もいますが

  • and some might argue that we still do,

    現在もそうだという人もいますが

  • in a situation of

    当時 地球規模の大惨事が 起きる瀬戸際にありました

  • being on the brink, literally,

    当時 地球規模の大惨事が 起きる瀬戸際にありました

  • of an apocalyptic, planetary calamity.

    当時 地球規模の大惨事が 起きる瀬戸際にありました

  • It's incredible that we actually lived through all that.

    当時 地球規模の大惨事が 起きる瀬戸際にありました

  • We were totally dependent during those years

    人類がこうした状況を生き延びたのは 驚くべきことです

  • on this amazing acronym, which is MAD.

    人類は相互確証破壊(MAD)と いうものに依存していたのです

  • It stands for mutually assured destruction.

    人類は相互確証破壊(MAD)と いうものに依存していたのです

  • So it meant

    人類は相互確証破壊(MAD)と いうものに依存していたのです

  • if you attacked us, we would attack you

    「もし相手が攻撃してきたら こちらも攻撃するぞ」という意味です

  • virtually simultaneously,

    「もし相手が攻撃してきたら こちらも攻撃するぞ」という意味です

  • and the end result would be a destruction

    「もし相手が攻撃してきたら こちらも攻撃するぞ」という意味です

  • of your country and mine.

    そうなると 最後には 双方の国が破壊されてしまいます

  • So the threat of my own destruction

    そうなると 最後には 双方の国が破壊されてしまいます

  • kept me from launching

    自国が壊滅する恐れがあるため 相手国への核攻撃が抑止されるのです

  • a nuclear attack on you. That's the way we lived.

    自国が壊滅する恐れがあるため 相手国への核攻撃が抑止されるのです

  • And the danger of that, of course, is that

    こうして私たちは生存しました

  • a misreading of a radar screen

    ここでの危険性は レーダーの誤読です

  • could actually cause a counter-launch,

    ここでの危険性は レーダーの誤読です

  • even though the first country had not actually launched anything.

    相手が発射していなくても カウンター攻撃が起きる可能性があります

  • During this chapter one,

    相手が発射していなくても カウンター攻撃が起きる可能性があります

  • there was a high level of public awareness

    当時「核の大惨事はありえる」という考えが

  • about the potential of nuclear catastrophe,

    当時「核の大惨事はありえる」という考えが

  • and an indelible image was implanted

    当時「核の大惨事はありえる」という考えが

  • in our collective minds

    集団意識の中に 深く植えつけられました

  • that, in fact, a nuclear holocaust

    集団意識の中に 深く植えつけられました

  • would be absolutely globally destructive

    実際に核戦争が起これば 全世界が破壊され

  • and could, in some ways, mean the end of civilization as we know it.

    実際に核戦争が起これば 全世界が破壊され

  • So this was chapter one.

    この文明は終わるかもしれません

  • Now the odd thing is that even though

    第1章はここまでです

  • we knew that there would be

    奇妙なことに我々は 文明が消滅することを知りつつ

  • that kind of civilization obliteration,

    奇妙なことに我々は 文明が消滅することを知りつつ

  • we engaged in America in a series --

    奇妙なことに我々は 文明が消滅することを知りつつ

  • and in fact, in the Soviet Union --

    アメリカもソ連も 一連の報復計画を議論していました

  • in a series of response planning.

    アメリカもソ連も 一連の報復計画を議論していました

  • It was absolutely incredible.

    アメリカもソ連も 一連の報復計画を議論していました

  • So premise one is we'd be destroying the world,

    全く信じられないことです

  • and then premise two is, why don't we get prepared for it?

    世界が破壊される可能性があるならば 対策を取るべきではないでしょうか?

  • So what

    世界が破壊される可能性があるならば 対策を取るべきではないでしょうか?

  • we offered ourselves

    ここでみなさんの記憶を 呼び覚ましたいと思います

  • was a collection of things. I'm just going to go skim through a few things,

    ここでみなさんの記憶を 呼び覚ましたいと思います

  • just to jog your memories.

    ここでみなさんの記憶を 呼び覚ましたいと思います

  • If you're born after 1950, this is just --

    ここでみなさんの記憶を 呼び覚ましたいと思います

  • consider this entertainment, otherwise it's memory lane.

    1950年以前に生まれた人は 懐かしく思うのではないでしょうか

  • This was Bert the Turtle. (Video)

    1950年以前に生まれた人は 懐かしく思うのではないでしょうか

  • This was basically an attempt

    カメのバート君です(ビデオ)

  • to teach our schoolchildren

    これは子供向けに作られたもので

  • that if we did get engaged

    これは子供向けに作られたもので

  • in a nuclear confrontation and atomic war,

    核戦争が起こったときは

  • then we wanted our school children

    核戦争が起こったときは

  • to kind of basically duck and cover.

    「机の下に隠れるように」 と教えています

  • That was the principle. You --

    「机の下に隠れるように」 と教えています

  • there would be a nuclear conflagration

    核爆発が起きたとしても

  • about to hit us, and if you get under your desk,

    核爆発が起きたとしても

  • things would be OK.

    机の下に隠れれば大丈夫なのです

  • (Laughter)

    机の下に隠れれば大丈夫なのです

  • I didn't do all that well

    (笑)

  • in psychiatry in medical school, but I was interested,

    私は医学部のときに 精神科で優秀だったわけではありませんが 興味はありました

  • and I think this was seriously delusional.

    私は医学部のときに 精神科で優秀だったわけではありませんが 興味はありました

  • (Laughter)

    このケースは重度の妄想が疑われます

  • Secondly, we told people

    (笑)

  • to go down in their basements

    また 地下に核シェルターを作ることが 勧められていました

  • and build a fallout shelter.

    また 地下に核シェルターを作ることが 勧められていました

  • Maybe it would be a study when we weren't having an atomic war,

    また 地下に核シェルターを作ることが 勧められていました

  • or you could use it as a TV room, or, as many teenagers found out,

    核戦争が起きていないときには テレビを見たり

  • a very, very safe place for a little privacy with your girlfriend.

    核戦争が起きていないときには テレビを見たり

  • And actually -- so there are multiple uses of the bomb shelters.

    彼女とこっそり会うことぐらいしか 使用されないかもしれません

  • Or you could buy a prefabricated bomb shelter

    彼女とこっそり会うことぐらいしか 使用されないかもしれません

  • that you could simply bury in the ground.

    しかし地下に埋めるだけの プレハブ式のシェルターなどもあり

  • Now, the bomb shelters at that point --

    しかし地下に埋めるだけの プレハブ式のシェルターなどもあり

  • let's say you bought a prefab one -- it would be a few hundred dollars,

    購入した場合 高いもので 500ドルぐらいの価格です

  • maybe up to 500, if you got a fancy one.

    購入した場合 高いもので 500ドルぐらいの価格です

  • Yet, what percentage of Americans

    購入した場合 高いもので 500ドルぐらいの価格です

  • do you think ever had a bomb shelter in their house?

    核シェルターを持った経験のある 米国人は何%いるでしょうか?

  • What percentage lived in a house with a bomb shelter?

    核シェルターを持った経験のある 米国人は何%いるでしょうか?

  • Less than two percent. About 1.4 percent

    核シェルターを持った経験のある 米国人は何%いるでしょうか?

  • of the population, as far as anyone knows,

    2%未満です

  • did anything,

    地下に核シェルターのための空間を確保したり 実際に作っているのは1.4%の人だけです

  • either making a space in their basement

    地下に核シェルターのための空間を確保したり 実際に作っているのは1.4%の人だけです

  • or actually building a bomb shelter.

    地下に核シェルターのための空間を確保したり 実際に作っているのは1.4%の人だけです

  • Many buildings, public buildings, around the country --

    地下に核シェルターのための空間を確保したり 実際に作っているのは1.4%の人だけです

  • this is New York City -- had these little civil defense signs,

    米国では多くの建物に 民間防衛のサインが掲げられています

  • and the idea was that you would

    米国では多くの建物に 民間防衛のサインが掲げられています

  • run into one of these shelters and be safe

    ここのシェルターに逃げ込めば 核攻撃から身を守れるというものです

  • from the nuclear weaponry.

    ここのシェルターに逃げ込めば 核攻撃から身を守れるというものです

  • And one of the greatest governmental delusions

    ここのシェルターに逃げ込めば 核攻撃から身を守れるというものです

  • of all time was something that happened

    ここで政府の大嘘があります

  • in the early days of

    ここで政府の大嘘があります

  • the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, as we now know,

    これには あの連邦緊急事態管理庁(FEMA) が関わっていました

  • and are well aware of their behaviors from Katrina.

    これには あの連邦緊急事態管理庁(FEMA) が関わっていました

  • Here is their first big public

    ハリケーン・カトリーナの対応で どんな組織かお分かりですね

  • announcement.

    FEMAが行った 最初の公式発表の中で

  • They would propose --

    FEMAが行った 最初の公式発表の中で

  • actually there were about six volumes written on this --

    緊急移住計画が提案されました

  • a crisis relocation plan

    緊急移住計画が提案されました

  • that was dependent upon

    緊急移住計画が提案されました

  • the United States having three to four days warning

    これはソ連が攻撃してくる3~4日前に 警報が発せられることが前提でした

  • that the Soviets were going to attack us.

    これはソ連が攻撃してくる3~4日前に 警報が発せられることが前提でした

  • So the goal was to evacuate the target cities.

    これはソ連が攻撃してくる3~4日前に 警報が発せられることが前提でした

  • We would move people out of the target cities

    標的となった都市から 人々を避難させることが目的です

  • into the countryside.

    標的となった都市から 人々を避難させることが目的です

  • And I'm telling you, I actually testified at the Senate

    標的となった都市から 人々を避難させることが目的です

  • about the absolute ludicrous idea

    私は上院議会で

  • that we would actually evacuate,

    「実際に避難や警報を行ってはどうか」 と発言しました

  • and actually have three or four days' warning.

    「実際に避難や警報を行ってはどうか」 と発言しました

  • It was just completely off the wall.

    「実際に避難や警報を行ってはどうか」 と発言しました

  • Turns out that they had another idea

    場違いな発言とみなされました 彼らには別の考えがあったのです

  • behind it, even though this was --

    場違いな発言とみなされました 彼らには別の考えがあったのです

  • they were telling the public it was to save us.

    その考えとは国民にこの計画で助かると 言っておきながら

  • The idea was that we would force the Soviets

    その考えとは国民にこの計画で助かると 言っておきながら

  • to re-target their nuclear weapons -- very expensive --

    ソ連に超高価な核兵器を 使わせるために

  • and potentially double their arsenal,

    ソ連に超高価な核兵器を 使わせるために

  • to not only take out the original site,

    ソ連に超高価な核兵器を 使わせるために

  • but take out sites where people were going.

    元々の標的だけでなく 避難先まで狙わせるつもりでした

  • This was what apparently, as it turns out, was behind all this.

    元々の標的だけでなく 避難先まで狙わせるつもりでした

  • It was just really, really frightening.

    裏でこんなことがあるとは 本当に恐ろしく思います

  • The main point here is we were dealing with

    裏でこんなことがあるとは 本当に恐ろしく思います

  • a complete disconnect from reality.

    ポイントは今までの対策が 現実離れしていたということです

  • The civil defense programs were disconnected

    ポイントは今までの対策が 現実離れしていたということです

  • from the reality of what we'd see in all-out nuclear war.

    民間防衛プログラムは 核戦争の現実を直視していません

  • So organizations like Physicians for Social Responsibility,

    民間防衛プログラムは 核戦争の現実を直視していません

  • around 1979, started saying this a lot publicly.

    「社会的責任を果たすための医師団」 のような団体は

  • They would do a bombing run. They'd go to your city,

    1979年頃から何度も公然と 以下のように述べています

  • and they'd say, "Here's a map of your city.

    都市が爆撃されるとわかったとき

  • Here's what's going to happen if we get a nuclear hit."

    「この地図には核攻撃を受けたとき どうなるかが書かれています」と言われるだけで

  • So no possibility of medical response to,

    「この地図には核攻撃を受けたとき どうなるかが書かれています」と言われるだけで

  • or meaningful preparedness for

    核戦争に対する医療対策や 適切な備えは何もありません

  • all-out nuclear war.

    核戦争に対する医療対策や 適切な備えは何もありません

  • So we had to prevent nuclear war

    核戦争に対する医療対策や 適切な備えは何もありません

  • if we expected to survive.

    だから生き残るためには 核戦争を防ぐ以外にないのです

  • This disconnect was never actually resolved.

    だから生き残るためには 核戦争を防ぐ以外にないのです

  • And what happened was --

    この現実離れが実際に 解消されることはありませんでした

  • when we get in to chapter two

    この現実離れが実際に 解消されることはありませんでした

  • of the nuclear threat era,

    ではどうなったのかを 第2章で説明したいと思います

  • which started back in 1945.

    ではどうなったのかを 第2章で説明したいと思います

  • Chapter two starts in 1991.

    核の脅威は1945年に始まりました

  • When the Soviet Union broke up,

    第2章は1991年から始まります ソビエト連邦が崩壊したため

  • we effectively lost that adversary

    第2章は1991年から始まります ソビエト連邦が崩壊したため

  • as a potential attacker of the United States, for the most part.

    米国を攻撃しようという敵が 一時的にいなくなったというわけです

  • It's not completely gone. I'm going to come back to that.

    米国を攻撃しようという敵が 一時的にいなくなったというわけです

  • But from 1991

    米国を攻撃しようという敵が 一時的にいなくなったというわけです

  • through the present time,

    しかし1991年以降

  • emphasized by the attacks of 2001,

    しかし1991年以降

  • the idea of an all-out nuclear war

    特に2001年のテロによって 核戦争への関心は薄れ

  • has diminished and the idea of a single event,

    特に2001年のテロによって 核戦争への関心は薄れ

  • act of nuclear terrorism

    核テロのみが 取沙汰されるようになりました

  • is what we have instead.

    核テロのみが 取沙汰されるようになりました

  • Although the scenario has changed

    核テロのみが 取沙汰されるようになりました

  • very considerably, the fact is

    シナリオが根本的に 変わったにもかかわらず

  • that we haven't changed our mental image

    シナリオが根本的に 変わったにもかかわらず

  • of what a nuclear war means.

    私達は核戦争に対する考え方を 変えられていません

  • So I'm going to tell you what the implications of that are in just a second.

    私達は核戦争に対する考え方を 変えられていません

  • So, what is a nuclear terror threat?

    では核テロの脅威とは何でしょうか?

  • And there's four key ingredients to describing that.

    では核テロの脅威とは何でしょうか?

  • First thing is that the global nuclear weapons,

    キーポイントは4つあります

  • in the stockpiles that I showed you in those original maps,

    1つ目は 世界中に存在する核兵器の セキュリティーです

  • happen to be not uniformly secure.

    1つ目は 世界中に存在する核兵器の セキュリティーです

  • And it's particularly not secure

    1つ目は 世界中に存在する核兵器の セキュリティーです

  • in the former Soviet Union, now in Russia.

    特に安全ではないのが旧ソ連 現在のロシアです

  • There are many, many sites where warheads are stored

    特に安全ではないのが旧ソ連 現在のロシアです

  • and, in fact, lots of sites where fissionable materials,

    ロシアには核弾頭の貯蔵庫をはじめ

  • like highly enriched uranium and plutonium,

    ウランやプルトニウムなどの 核分裂物質を扱う施設が多くありますが

  • are absolutely not safe.

    ウランやプルトニウムなどの 核分裂物質を扱う施設が多くありますが

  • They're available to be bought, stolen, whatever.

    全くセキュリティーが保たれていません 売買や盗難など何でも起こり得ます

  • They're acquirable, let me put it that way.

    全くセキュリティーが保たれていません 売買や盗難など何でも起こり得ます

  • From 1993 through 2006,

    核をすぐ手に入れられるのです

  • the International Atomic Energy Agency

    1993年から2006年にかけて