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  • Trump: I cant' believe this. I'm a politician!

  • Liz: Un-f*cking-believable

  • "You can see the excitement!"

  • Trump: Look at those hands. Are they small hands?

  • Liz: People want to move, people want to move to Canada.

  • They're not acting like politicians, they're acting like middle school kids.

  • If Donald Trump is President, it's going to be a really big disaster and I'll probably

  • have to leave the country. Liz: Where would you go?

  • I'm going to Canada Liz: You're going to move to Canada?

  • Hello Kitty: I love Canada Liz: 28% of Americans say they'll move to Canada

  • if Donald Trump is elected president, 15% if Hillary is elected president

  • I agree, I would move too We brought the immigration forms for permanent

  • residency in Canada.

  • I have application forms for permanent residency in Canada. Would you fill them out?

  • [commotion, laughing]

  • Liz: And they were like, hell yeah. It would be a great reality show, like I would watch

  • that show, it would be very well written honestly if it was a reality show, but it's real life.

  • [funky music]

  • I was shocked that people actually filled them out.

  • Joe: But what do we do now, what do we do with them?

  • Liz: Right. Yeah we didn't think about that. There is one person we could ask.

  • Joe: You can't just text the Prime Minister. [Laughs]

  • Trudeau: Perfect day. So glad to be here. Justin Trudeau. Prime minister of Canada.

  • Hearthrob phenom who rode a wave of flowers and sunshine to victory last fall. He’s

  • such a phenomenon that he inspired this

  • Man: Could you run for President here?

  • Trudeau: No no no, you know what, you know what.

  • Man: We will literally beg you.

  • Trudeau: Get up guys.

  • Trudeau: I don't know if you noticed but I actually have a job and it's a pretty good

  • one.

  • Liz: Once I got him away from the thronging bros, I asked him about the impending 86.8

  • million Americans.

  • That's like so many millions of Americans?

  • Trudeau: If you remember George W Bush's election, George W Bush's reelection especially, there

  • was a lot of people saying, "Oh, no. If he gets elected again I'm moving to Canada."

  • Then other people were saying the same thing around Obama and Obama's reelection. Every

  • election cycle that's the easy go-to threat for people in the States to say when something

  • happens they don't want it to happen. The candidate I want doesn't get elected, I'm

  • moving to Canada. If you actually look at what happens after elections, the immigration

  • numbers don't necessarily spike.

  • Liz: So we actually talked to New Yorkers. Do you mind if I share their messages with

  • you?

  • Hey Prime Minister Trudeau. Please help us

  • Please help us If you can grant me refugee status from Donald

  • Trump I'm totally going to move to your country Let all Americans come to Canada so we can

  • be safe, happy and free. You had a quote that your cabinet is diverse

  • because it's 2016, that's the kind of thing we need, we need to move forward and be more

  • inclusive. Move that border we don't want no border between

  • us anymore, we don't want that, we want one country, one nation, one president.

  • If things go rogue, you know, in that bad direction,

  • Save us Save us from Trump

  • Please save us Thank you

  • Trudeau: This actually gives me tremendous confidence.

  • Liz: Really?

  • Yeah. Because people are realizing that this election does matter, and they have strong

  • opinions, and people who might not have thought about voting are now going to make sure that

  • their voices get heard, and they're going to make sure that the government that gets

  • elected in the United States reflects their values and their priorities and that's what

  • democracy is supposed to be all about.

  • We had difficult, discussions in our election campaign. We've had challenges around all

  • sorts of things, and I think the sense is that we're a place that has been able to work

  • through it and work it out a little bit better than some other places because Canada is one

  • of countries that figured out a fair while ago that differences and diversity are actually

  • a source of strength, not a source of weaknesses, and when you draw people together with a whole

  • bunch of different perspectives but a similar desire to succeed and create a good future

  • for themselves and their neighbors, there's a lot of good things that happen.

  • Not many countries beat Canada in terms of immigration. 1 in 5 Canadians weren't born

  • there and I out of 10 refugees resettled across the world is resettled in Canada.

  • And yet all of this diversity is not causing the chaos that many people feared. And that

  • diversity now shows up in its leadership. One of the first things that Justin Trudeau

  • did as Prime Minister was design a diverse cabinet of an equal amount of men and women.

  • What would the world look like if every cabinet or every office was 50/50.

  • First of all citizens around the world would be more comfortable that their issues might

  • be noticed and taken seriously. The question when you have a broadly diverse cabinet is

  • not, I mean because there's always in a group of thirty people no matter how you put it

  • together, there's going to be groups Quite frankly we need a new set of solutions. We

  • know that Einstein was right, the problems we have created for ourselves can't be solved

  • at the same level of thinking that created those problems, well we need to try a different

  • approach that's much more heterogeneous in our decision making.

  • But it's not like it's rainbows and butterflies either, in the 90s the country was so divided

  • it almost separated. And many Canadians aren't on board with this multiculturalism.

  • There's even a poll showing that a third of Canadians actually agree with Trump's Muslim

  • ban. How do you govern for all Canadians including those?

  • For me I try to bring it down to the actual people and the individuals. There's two ways

  • to do it. The first one is that, on individuals, and you ask if they really, when they think

  • about that, they're really thinking about the shop keeper down the street who they see

  • every day and goes, "No. No. No. No. That guy is great, but, you know, it's just in

  • general." You realize that it's a nebulous fear that has latched onto an idea, perhaps

  • enhanced by politics, perhaps enhanced by media, but it's not actually tangible. A great

  • example of that was the issue of Quebec's Charte des Valeurs.

  • This was a highly controversial but popular bill recently proposed in Quebec. It would

  • have banned state employes from wearing religious symbols while working.

  • When people actually realized what that would mean was, for example, a young woman would

  • have to choose between her job and her faith, people said, "Well, no. No. No. That's not

  • what we wanted at all, and that's not what we need at all."

  • I think a lot of what we need to do is really unpack the consequences of things, and the

  • idea of rights and freedoms and being a free society, I mean a society that tells a woman

  • what she has to wear on her head in the case of a veil or a niqab is not a free society,

  • but then how is a society that tells a woman what she can't wear on her head or on her

  • face? How is that a free society? It's not an easy question, it's not an easy answer,

  • but it's a conversation that should be had in a responsible, respectful way, and what

  • I've found is whenever I've had genuine conversations with people there's a reasonableness and a

  • openness that shines through with most people. You will always find exceptions.

  • The challenge is politics doesn't work in thoughtful, reasonable conversations anymore.

  • It happens in soundbites, in shouted slogans, in bumper stickers, in ten second video clips,

  • and how we take those tools that we have to use and tie them to reasonable conversations

  • is the big challenge that politics is defined by now.

  • So even though we love to dream about running away to Canada, these problems seem pretty

  • familiar. And Canada has its own issues.

  • We're doing okay but there's a lot of work to do.

  • What's the work left to do, what's left to fix?

  • A big one, Canada has for generations if not centuries broken its relationship and its

  • partnership with indigenous peoples. We ignored the fact that thousands upon thousands of

  • indigenous women and girls went missing and murdered over the past few decades, and we

  • need to reengage with that responsibly. We need to look at the fact that a kid who grows

  • up in an indigenous community doesn't have the same access to education or positive outcomes

  • that any kids born anywhere else in the country have. There's a lot of work to do on that.

  • There's more work to do even on feminism. A lot of people are talking about how it's

  • 2016 and we're doing well, and there are good things that we've done, but we're still way

  • down on the list of countries in terms of pay equity. Canada is worse than a lot of

  • other countries including ones we wouldn't suspect we would be worse than on are women

  • paid as much as men. There's a lot of work still to do.

  • Thank you guys, I've got a really good job right now.

  • When has running away from our problems really solved anything? Maybe instead of running

  • away to Canada, we can learn something from it.

  • What did you drop? [Giggles]

  • Do you known feminist Ryan Gosling, the meme?

  • Yes. I'd seen a little bit of that.

  • There's a study that shows that when men were exposed to the meme they were more likely

  • to identify with feminist beliefs. Would you be willing for us to use a photo of you and

  • put the feminist meme?

  • Trudeau: Absolutely. Absolutely.

  • I have applications to apply for permanent residence in Canada.

  • I couldn't do it.

  • I couldn't do it.

  • What if it was 3 degrees warmer?

  • I just know this girl from Canada and I hate her so much and so she ruined the country

  • for me. I'm not even kidding. If you can kick this one person from the country and grant

  • me refugee status from Donald Trump, I'm totally going to move to your country.

  • Where do I put my email?

  • Like your height, color of your eyes, it's like a tinder application.

  • Does he get it?

  • Yes

  • How do I put like dating two people? Is that an option?

  • Yeah. Just put like polyamorous or whatever you want to call that.

  • Dating two men.

Trump: I cant' believe this. I'm a politician!

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ジャスティン・トルドーはカナダに移住しないことをかなり確信している|2016ish #1 (Justin Trudeau is pretty sure you won't move to Canada | 2016ish #1)

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    Samuel に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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