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  • It just sold for 5 billion.

  • Of course it did.

  • It's brilliant.

  • Oh, it's performance art!

  • These rich snobs don't know more about art than you.

  • They're mostly just here to make money.

  • Oh!

  • We're told that art like this is so expensive

  • because it's the best in the world.

  • But the fact is, you're looking at a massive price-fixing scheme

  • that benefits wealthy collectors and excludes artists like you.

  • Adam, shush it!

  • The prices here are high because the art is objectively good.

  • Nope. The prices are high because

  • a small group of galleries and collectors decided it was good,

  • and once they do that,

  • the price goes up, whether or not anyone else agrees.

  • You. Paint something.

  • (gasps)

  • I declare this valuable art.

  • Go find more cubed meat.

  • We're gonna be rich.

  • (chuckles)

  • Well, outsider art is a rich tradition.

  • How much is this worth?

  • There's no way to tell.

  • Big galleries actually keep their prices a secret

  • so they can change them depending on who the buyer is.

  • For you, my friend, ten grand,

  • and for you, my enemy, 200 grand.

  • And they do their best to keep out buyers

  • who are considered elites.

  • Daniel Radcliffe once tried to buy a fancy painting,

  • but he was denied when the

  • dealer told him

  • he was waiting for a more

  • prestigious collector.

  • For you? Not for sale.

  • Please, sir.

  • I just want one painting that doesn't talk to me.

  • Why are you doing this to me?

  • Because if the gallery only sells to art world elites,

  • they'll be seen as a better brand,

  • which means all of their other paintings will be worth more.

  • Ah.

  • (cash registers dinging)

  • Hmm. That is shady behavior.

  • Well, luckily, we outsiders could just go to art auctions.

  • They're democratic open markets where anyone can buy.

  • Sorry, but the major auction houses

  • are just as rigged as the galleries.

  • (pounds gavel)

  • Auctions play all sorts of dirty tricks to drive their prices up,

  • like straight up paying people to bid.

  • Let's start the bidding at $4 million.

  • Do I see 4 million?

  • (snoring)

  • 4 million.

  • And if the bidding is too slow,

  • auctioneers even use a practice called chandelier bidding.

  • They just point to a random spot above everyone's heads

  • and pretend to see a bid.

  • And I see 5 million from the bidder in the back,

  • she's my girlfriend who you don't know 'cause she lives in Canada.

  • Whoop, she's back across the border, so don't turn around.

  • Oh, whatever. Six million.

  • Why are you okay with this?

  • Oh, simple, darling.

  • I own other paintings by this artist,

  • so when this one sells high,

  • it increases the value of my entire collection.

  • Sometimes we even bid anonymously

  • to drive up the price.

  • Up next, we have a fine comdiment-based work

  • from an emerging artist.

  • Ooh!

  • I want to bid on this one.

  • We should all bid on this one.

  • Let's start the bidding at $7 million.

  • This shady market can also be manipulated by crooks who use it

  • to defraud the government and launder dirty money.

  • Hello.

  • I would like to buy a painting from your fine gallery

  • using legitimate cash moneys.

  • The red is... paint.

  • But not all collectors are crooks.

  • I mean, there's good people out there

  • who donate their collections to museums.

  • Sure, and that seems very charitable,

  • until you remember that that donation is also a tax write-off.

  • And here's where it can get really shady.

  • The collectors hire their own appraisers

  • to determine the value of the art they donate,

  • so they can use it as one big tax dodge.

  • You owe 40 million in taxes this year.

  • Ugh!

  • What if I donate this painting worth 40 million?

  • At the end of the day, this is what the fine art market is.

  • A few rich people passing money around.

  • No! No! Then I want no part of this!

  • Screw this gallery and screw this opening!

  • I will make it in the fine art world on my own.

  • Sorry, that's not really how it works.

  • Persephone, this is Allison Schrager.

  • She's an economist and journalist at Quartz

  • who has reported on the fine art market.

  • Not only is the fine art world manipulated financially,

  • it's also extremely exclusive.

  • Only a small share of artists are allowed to succeed

  • and only their work is considered valuable.

  • And those aren't necessarily the best artists.

  • Often, they're just the ones who are best at

  • marketing themselves and at playing the gallery game.

  • One art dealer I spoke with even admitted

  • that the art you buy in the street

  • is cheaper and often just as good,

  • it's just not as prestigious,

  • so big collectors in museums just aren't interested in it.

  • And that means this small group of ultra wealthy investors

  • ends up defining what fine art is.

  • So the fine art world is all a lie,

  • and it's all about money

  • and who gets into this stupid snobby club?

  • More or less.

It just sold for 5 billion.

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アダムはすべてを台無しにする - 美術品市場はいかに詐欺か|truTV (Adam Ruins Everything - How the Fine Art Market is a Scam | truTV)

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    Kristi Yang に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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