Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hi, I'm John Green, This is Crash Course: World History and today we're going to talk

    こんにちは、私はジョン・グリーンです。今日は、世界史についてお話しします。

  • about something that ought to be controversial: The Renaissance.

    議論を呼ぶべき何かについて:ルネッサンス。

  • So you probably already know about the Renaissance thanks to the work of noted teenage mutant

    ルネッサンスについては既に知っているでしょう?注目すべき十代のミュータントの仕事のおかげで

  • ninja turtles Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello, and Raphael. But that isn't the whole story.

    忍者カメ レオナルド ミケランジェロ ドナテッロ ラファエロしかし、それだけではありません。

  • (Me-from-the-past:) Mr. Green, Mr. Green. What about Splinter? I think he was an architect.

    (過去の私:)グリーンさん、グリーンさん。スプリンターは?建築家だったと思います。

  • Ugh, me from the past, you're such an idiot. Splinter was a painter, sculptor, AND an architect.

    うわ 昔の私ってバカねスプリンターは画家で彫刻家で建築家だった

  • He was a quite a Renaissance rat.

    彼はかなりのルネッサンス期のネズミだった。

  • [Intro music]

    [Intro music]

  • [intro music]

    [イントロの音楽]

  • [intro music]

    [イントロの音楽]

  • [intro music]

    [イントロの音楽]

  • [intro music]

    [イントロの音楽]

  • [intro music]

    [イントロの音楽]

  • [intro music]

    [イントロの音楽]

  • Right, so the story goes that the Renaissance saw the rebirth of European culture after

    ルネッサンスの後、ヨーロッパ文化の再生を見たという話ですね。

  • the miserable Dark Ages, and that it ushered in the modern era of secularism, rationality,

    惨めな暗黒時代と世俗主義、合理性の現代への道を開いたのです

  • and individualism.

    と個人主義。

  • And those are all in the list of things we like here at Crash Course.

    そして、それらはすべてクラッシュコースで好きなことのリストにあります。

  • (Me-from-the-past:) Mr. Green. I think you're forgetting Cool Ranch Doritos?

    (過去の私:)グリーンさん。クールランチドリトスを忘れていませんか?

  • Yeah, fair enough.

    ああ、十分だ

  • Then what is so controversial? Well, the whole idea of a European Renaissance presupposes

    では何がそんなに議論の余地があるのでしょうか?ヨーロッパ・ルネッサンスという考え方は

  • that Europe was like an island unto itself that was briefly enlightened when the Greeks

    ギリシャ人の時に一時的に悟りを開いたヨーロッパは、それ自体が島のようなものであった。

  • were ascendant and then lost its way and then rediscovered its former European glory.

    が上昇し、道を失い、かつてのヨーロッパの栄光を再発見しました。

  • Furthermore, I'm going to argue that the Renaissance didn't even necessarily happen.

    さらに、ルネッサンスは必ずしも起こっていなかったと主張します。

  • But first, let's assume that it did. Essentially, the Renaissance was an efflorescence of arts

    しかし、まず、そうだったと仮定してみましょう。本質的に ルネッサンスは芸術の開花でした

  • (primarily visual, but also to a lesser extent literary) and ideas in Europe that coincided

    主に視覚的なものですが、文学的なものも少なくありません)とヨーロッパの思想が一致していました。

  • with the rediscovery of Roman and Greek culture.

    ローマ・ギリシャ文化の再発見とともに

  • It is easiest to see this in terms of visual art, Renaissance art tends to feature a focus

    それは視覚芸術の面でこれを見るのが最も簡単ですが、ルネッサンスの芸術は、フォーカスを特色にする傾向がある

  • on the human form, somewhat idealized, as Roman and especially Greek art had.

    ローマと特にギリシャの芸術が持っていたように、やや理想化された人間の形で。

  • And this classicizing is also rather apparent in the architecture of the Renaissance which

    そして、この古典化はルネサンスの建築にも見られます。

  • featured all sorts of Greek columns and triangular pediments and Roman arches and domes. In fact,

    ギリシャの柱や三角形のペディメント、ローマのアーチやドームなど、さまざまな種類のものが紹介されていました。実際には

  • looking at a Renaissance building you might even be able to fool yourself into thinking

    ルネッサンスの建物を見ていると、自分でもそう思うようになるかもしれない

  • you're looking at an actual Greek building, if you sort of squint and ignore the fact

    実際のギリシャの建物を見ているんだよ、目を細めて事実を無視すれば

  • that Greek buildings tend to be, you know, ruins.

    ギリシャの建物は廃墟になりがちだからな

  • In addition to rediscovering, that is, copying Greek and Roman art, the Renaissance saw the rediscovery

    ルネサンスでは、ギリシャやローマの芸術の再発見、つまりコピーに加えて、再発見が行われました。

  • of Greek and Roman writings and their ideas.

    ギリシャとローマの文献とその思想の

  • And that opened up a whole new world for scholars well, not a new world, actually since the texts

    学者にとっては全く新しい世界が開かれました。

  • were more than 1000 years old, but you know what I mean.

    は10000年以上前のものでしたが

  • The scholars who examined, translated, and commented upon these writings were called

    これらの文章を調べ、翻訳し、解説した学者たちは、以下のように呼ばれていました。

  • humanists, which can be a little bit of a confusing term, because it implies they were

    人文主義者というのは少し紛らわしい言葉ですが、それは彼らが

  • concerned with, you know, humans rather than, say, the religious world.

    宗教の世界というよりも、人間のことを考えている。

  • Which can add to the common, but totally incorrect, assumption that Renaissance writers and artists

    ルネッサンス期の作家や芸術家は、一般的に、しかし完全に間違っているという思い込みに、これを加えることができます。

  • and scholars were, like, secretly not religious.

    と学者は密かに無宗教だったような。

  • That is a favorite favorite area of speculation on the Internet and in Dan Brown novels, but

    それは、インターネット上やダン・ブラウンの小説の中での憶測のお気に入りの領域ですが

  • the truth is that Renaissance artists were religious. As evidence, let me present you

    ルネッサンスの芸術家は 宗教的だったというのが真実です証拠として、あなたを紹介しましょう

  • with that fact that they painted the Madonna over and over and over and over and over and

    マドンナを何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も何度も

  • STAN!

    スタン!

  • Anyway, all humanism means is that these scholars studied what were called the humanities. Literature,

    いずれにしても、ヒューマニズムとは、これらの学者が人文学と呼ばれるものを研究していたということです。文学ですね。

  • philosophy, history.

    哲学、歴史。

  • Today, of course, these areas of study are known as the so-called dark arts. What? Liberal

    今日ではもちろん、これらの学問分野はいわゆる暗黒術と呼ばれています。何が?リベラル

  • arts? Aw, Stan, you're always making history less fun. I WANT TO BE A PROFESSOR OF THE

    芸術?スタン あなたはいつも歴史を面白くなくしている私は教授になりたいの

  • DARK ARTS.

    DARK ARTS.

  • Stan (Off camera): The Dark Arts job, it's a dangerous position.

    スタン(オフカメラ)。ダークアーツの仕事は、危険なポジションです。

  • John: Yeah, I guess that is true, so we'll stick with this.

    ジョン:うん、そうだね、だからこれにこだわるよ。

  • Right so here at Crash Course, we try not to focus too much on dates, but if I'm going

    ここのクラッシュ・コースでは、あまりデートを重視しないようにしていますが、もし私が行くのであれば

  • to convince you that the Renaissance didn't actually happen, I should probably tell you,

    ルネッサンスは実際には起こらなかったと 納得してもらうために、私はあなたに言うべきでしょう。

  • you know, when it didn't happen. So traditionally the Renaissance is associated with the 15th

    何も起こらなかった時にねルネッサンスは伝統的に15世紀に関連しています

  • and 16th centuries. Ish.

    と16世紀イシュ。

  • The Renaissance happened all across Europe, but we're going to focus on Italy, because

    ルネッサンスはヨーロッパ全土で起こったが、イタリアに焦点を当てることにした。

  • I want to and I own the video camera. Plus, Italy really spawned the Renaissance.

    ビデオカメラを所有しています。さらに、イタリアは本当にルネッサンスを産み出しました。

  • What was it about Italy that lent itself to Renaissancing? Was it the wine? The olives?

    ルネッサンシングに適したイタリアの魅力とは?ワイン?オリーブ?

  • The pasta? The plumbers? The relative permissiveness when it comes to the moral lassitude of their

    パスタの方?配管工?のモラルのなさになると相対的に寛容になるのは、彼らの

  • leaders? Well, let's go to the Thought Bubble.

    リーダーは?さて、思考バブルへ行こうか。

  • Italy was primed for Renaissance for exactly one reason: Money.

    イタリアはルネッサンスのために 用意されていた まさに1つの理由のためにお金です。

  • A society has to be super rich to support artists and elaborate building projects and

    アーティストや精巧な建築プロジェクトを支援するためには、超リッチな社会でなければなりません。

  • to feed scholars who translate and comment on thousand-year-old documents. And the Italian

    千年前の文書を翻訳してコメントする学者を養うためにまた、イタリア語の

  • city states were very wealthy for two reasons.

    都市国家が非常に裕福だったのには2つの理由があります。

  • First, many city states were mini-industrial powerhouses each specializing in a particular

    まず、多くの都市国家は、特定の分野に特化したミニ産業大国でした。

  • industrial product like Florence made cloth, Milan made arms.

    フィレンツェが作った布、ミラノが作った腕のような工業製品。

  • Second, the cities of Venice and Genoa got stinking rich from trade.

    第二に、ヴェネツィアとジェノバの街は、貿易で大金持ちになった。

  • Genoa turned out a fair number of top-notch sailors, like for instance Christopher Columbus.

    ジェノバは、クリストファー・コロンブスのような一流の船乗りを輩出した。

  • But the Venetians became the richest city state of all.

    しかし、ヴェネツィア人は最も裕福な都市国家となった。

  • As you'll remember from the Crusades, the Venetians were expert sailors, shipbuilders,

    十字軍で覚えていると思いますが、ヴェネツィア人は船乗りや造船のエキスパートでした。

  • and merchants and as you'll remember from our discussions of Indian Ocean trade, they

    そして、インド洋貿易の話をしていて覚えていると思いますが、彼らは

  • also had figured out ways to trade with Islamic empires, including the biggest economic power

    帝國との交易の方法も考え出していた。

  • in the region: the Ottomans.

    地域では:オスマン人

  • Without trading with the Islamic world, especially in pepper, Venice couldn't have afforded

    イスラム圏との交易がなければ、ヴェネツィアは、特に唐辛子を買う余裕がなかった。

  • all those painters nor would they have had money to pay for the incredibly fancy clothes

    絵描きたちも、信じられないほど派手な服を着るお金もなかったでしょう。

  • they put on to pose for their fancy portraits.

    派手な肖像画のポーズをとるために着ているのです。

  • The clothes, the paint, the painters, enough food to get a double chin all of that was

    服も絵の具も絵師も二重あごが出るほどの食べ物も全てが

  • paid for with money from trade with the Ottomans.

    オスマンとの貿易で得たお金で賄われています。

  • I know I talk a lot about trade, but that is because it is so incredibly awesome, and it

    私はトレードの話をたくさんしていますが、それは信じられないほど素晴らしいものだからです。

  • really does bind the world together.

    本当に世界を縛っています。

  • And while trade can lead to conflicts, on balance, it has been responsible for more

    そして、貿易は紛争を引き起こす可能性がありますが、バランスを考えれば、貿易はより多くの問題を引き起こしてきました。

  • peaceful contacts than violent ones because, you know, death is bad for business.

    暴力的なものよりも平和的な接触の方がいいんだよな、死はビジネスに悪いからな。

  • This was certainly the case in the Eastern Mediterranean where the periods of trade-based

    これは確かに東地中海では、貿易を基盤とした

  • diplomacy were longer and more frequent than periods of war, even though all we ever talk

    外交は戦争の時期よりも長く、頻繁に行われていました。

  • about is war because it is very dramatic, which is why my brother Hank's favorite video

    弟のハンクのお気に入りのビデオがある理由は、それがとてもドラマチックだからです。

  • game is called Assassin's Creed, not Some Venetian Guys Negotiate A Trade Treaty.

    ゲームはアサシンクリードと呼ばれる、いくつかのヴェネツィアのガイズは貿易条約を交渉しない。

  • Thanks, Thought Bubble. So here's another example of non-Europeans supporting the Renaissance:

    ありがとう 思考の泡ヨーロッパ以外の人が ルネッサンスを支持している例があります

  • The Venetians exported textiles to the Ottomans.

    ヴェネツィア人はオスマン帝国に織物を輸出しました。

  • They were usually woven in other cities like Florence, and the reason Florentine textiles

    フィレンツェのような他の都市で織られていたのが一般的で、フィレンツェの織物の理由

  • were so valuable is because their color remained vibrant.

    が貴重だったのは、その色が生き生きとしていたからです。

  • That is because they were dyed with a chemical called alum, which was primarily found in

    それは、彼らがミョウバンと呼ばれる化学物質で染められていたからです。

  • Anatolia, in the Ottoman Empire.

    オスマン帝国のアナトリア。

  • So to make the textiles the Ottomans craved, the Italians needed Ottoman alum, at least

    オスマン人が欲しがっていた織物を作るために、イタリア人は少なくともオスマン人のミョウバンを必要としていました。

  • until 1460.

    1460年まで。

  • When Giovanni da Castro, Pope Pius Ilis' godson, discovered alum, in Italy, in Tolfa.

    教皇ピウス・イリスの名付け親であるジョヴァンニ・ダ・カストロがイタリアのトルファでミョウバンを発見した時のこと。

  • And he wrote to his godfather, the Pope: ''Today I bring you victory over the Turk. Every year

    そして、彼は彼の名付け親である教皇に手紙を書いた:「今日、私はあなたにトルコ人に対する勝利をもたらします。毎年

  • they wring from the Christians more than 300,000 ducats for the alum with which we dye wool

    羊毛を染めるミョウバンのためにキリスト教徒から30万ドゥカッツ以上の金を巻き上げる

  • various colors... But I have found seven mountains so rich in this material that they could supply

    色とりどりの色がありますしかし、私は7つの山を見つけました... ...この材料が豊富で... ...それらが供給することができるように

  • seven worlds. If you will give orders to engage workmen, build furnaces, and melt the ore,

    七つの世界鉱石を溶かすための命令をするならば

  • you will provide all Europe with alum and the Turk will lose all his profits. Instead

    あなたがヨーロッパ中にミョウバンを提供してくれれば、トルコ人はすべての利益を失うことになります。その代わりに

  • they will accrue to you."

    "彼らはあなたに利益をもたらすだろう"

  • So the Pope was like, "Heck yeah." More importantly he granted a monopoly on the mining

    ローマ法王は "そうだな "と思ったんだもっと重要なのは、彼は鉱業の独占を認めたことです

  • rights of alum to a particular Florentine family, the Medicis.

    フィレンツェの特定の一族であるメディシス家の同窓生の権利。

  • You know, the ones you always see painted.

    いつも絵を描いているのを見ていると

  • But vitally, Italian alum mines didn't bring victory over the Turks, or cause them to lose

    しかし、肝心のイタリアのミョウバンは、トルコ人に勝利をもたらしたわけではないし、トルコ人の敗北の原因にもならなかった。

  • all their profits, just as mining and drilling at home never alleviate the need for trade.

    国内での採掘や掘削が貿易の必要性を軽減しないのと同じように、すべての利益を得ることができます。

  • Okay, one last way contact with Islam helped to create the European Renaissance, if indeed

    イスラム教との接触がヨーロッパ・ルネッサンスの形成に役立ったとすれば、最後の手段です。

  • it happened: The Muslim world was the source of many of the writings that Renaissance scholars

    が起こったのです。ルネサンスの学者たちが書いた 多くの著作の源は イスラム世界にありました

  • studied.

    を勉強しました。

  • For centuries, Muslim scholars had been working their way through ancient Greek writings,

    何世紀にもわたって、イスラム教の学者たちは古代ギリシアの文献を調べてきました。

  • especially Ptolemy and Aristotle, who despite being consistently wrong about everything

    特にプトレマイオスとアリストテレスは、すべてのことについて一貫して間違っていたにもかかわらず

  • managed to be the jumping off point for thinking both in the Christian and Muslim worlds.

    は、キリスト教とイスラム教の両方の世界で考えるためのジャンプ・オフ・ポイントとなっています。

  • And the fall of Constantinople in 1453 helped further spread Greek ideas because Byzantine

    そして1453年のコンスタンティノープルの落下はビザンチンのためにそれ以上ギリシャの考えを広めるのを助けた

  • scholars fled for Italy, taking their books with them. So we have the Ottomans to thank

    学者たちは本を持ってイタリアに逃げたオスマン帝国に感謝しなければならない

  • for that, too.

    そのためにも

  • And even after it had become a Muslim capital, Istanbul was still, like, the number one destination

    イスラム教の首都になった後も イスタンブールは第一の目的地でした

  • for book nerds searching for ancient Greek texts.

    古代ギリシャ語のテキストを探している本のオタクのために。

  • Plus, if we stretch our definition of Renaissance thought to include scientific thought, there

    さらに、ルネッサンス思想の定義を科学的思考を含むように拡張すれば、そこには

  • is a definite case to be made that Muslim scholars influenced Copernicus, arguably the

    イスラム教の学者がコペルニクスに影響を与えたことは間違いありません。

  • Renaissance's greatest mind.

    ルネッサンスの偉大な精神

  • Oh, it's time for the open letter? An Open Letter to Copernicus.

    おお、公開書簡の時間か?コペルニクスへの公開書簡

  • But first, let's see what is in the secret compartment today. Wow, the heliocentric solar

    その前に、今日は秘密の区画の中身を見てみましょう。なんと、ヘリオセントリックソーラーの

  • system? Cool. Earth in the middle, sun in the middle, earth in the middle, sun in the

    システムは?かっこいいですね。真ん中の地球、真ん中の太陽、真ん中の地球、真ん中の太陽

  • middle. Ptolemy. Copernicus. Ptolemy. Copernicus.

    中段。プトレマイオスコペルニクスプトレマイオスコペルニクス

  • Right, an open letter to Copernicus.

    そうか、コペルニクスへの公開書簡か。

  • Dear Copernicus,

    親愛なるコペルニクス

  • Why you always gotta make the rest of us look so bad?

    なんでいつも俺たちを悪く見せるんだ?

  • You were both a lawyer and a doctor? That doesn't seem fair.

    弁護士と医者の両方だったのか?フェアじゃないわね

  • You spoke four languages and discovered that the earth is not the center of the universe,

    4つの言語を話して、地球が宇宙の中心ではないことがわかりましたね。

  • come on.

    勘弁してくれよ

  • But at least you didn't discover it entirely on your own. Now, there's no way to be sure

    でも少なくとも自分で発見したわけではないでしょう。確かめる方法はないが

  • that you had access to Muslim scholarship on this topic.

    あなたがこのトピックに関するイスラム教の奨学金にアクセスしていたことを知っていました。

  • But one of your diagrams is so similar to a proof found in an Islamic mathematics treatise

    しかし、あなたの図の1つは、イスラムの数学の論文に見られる証明に非常に似ています。

  • that it is almost impossible that you didn't have access to it.

    アクセスできなかったということはほぼありえないことです。

  • Even the letters on the diagram are almost the same. So at least I can tell my mom that

    図の文字でさえ、ほぼ同じです。だから、少なくとも母には

  • when she asks why I'm not a doctor and a lawyer and the guy who discovered the heliocentric

    なぜ私は医者でも弁護士でもなく ヘリオセントリックを発見した人なのかと聞かれて

  • solar system.

    太陽系。

  • Best wishes, John Green

    幸運を祈る、ジョン・グリーン

  • Alright, so now having spent the last several minutes telling you why the Renaissance happened

    さてさて、なぜルネッサンスが起こったのか、最後の数分を費やしてお話してきました。

  • in Italy and not in, I don't know, like India or Russia or whatever, I'm going to argue

    イタリアではなく、インドでもロシアでも何でもない、と言いたいところです。

  • that the Renaissance did not in fact happen.

    ルネッサンスは実際には起こらなかったと

  • Let's start with the problem of time. The Renaissance isn't like the Battle of Hastings

    まずは時間の問題から始めよう。ルネッサンスはヘイスティングスの戦いのようなものではない

  • or the French Revolution where people were aware that they were living amid history.

    あるいは、歴史の中で生きていることを意識したフランス革命。

  • Like, when I was eleven and most of you didn't exist yet, my dad made my brother and me turn

    私が11歳の時、あなた方のほとんどがまだ存在していなかった時、父は私と弟を変身させました。

  • off the Cosby Show and watch people climbing on the Berlin Wall so we could see history.

    コスビー・ショーをオフにして、ベルリンの壁に登っている人たちを見て、歴史を見ることができました。

  • But no one, like, woke their kids up in Tuscan village in 1512 like, ''Mario, Luigi, come

    しかし、1512年にトスカーナの村で子供たちを起こして「マリオ、ルイージ、来い」と言った人はいませんでした。

  • outside! The Renaissance is here!

    外に出ろ!ルネッサンスはここにある!

  • Hurry, we're living in a glorious new era, where man's relationship to learning is changing.

    急いで、私たちは、人間の学びとの関係が変化していく、輝かしい新時代を生きているのです。

  • I somehow feel a new sense of individualism based on my capacity for reason."

    何となく、理性の能力に基づく個人主義の新しさを感じます。"

  • No. In fact, most people in Europe were totally unaware of the Renaissance, because its art

    いや、実際、ヨーロッパのほとんどの人はルネッサンスのことを全く知らなかった。

  • and learning affected a tiny sliver of the European population.

    と学習は、ヨーロッパの人口のごく一部に影響を与えました。

  • Like, life expectancy in many areas of Europe actually went down during the Renaissance.

    ルネサンス期にヨーロッパの多くの地域で実際に寿命が縮んだように。

  • Art and learning of the Renaissance didn't filter down to most people the way that technology

    ルネサンスの芸術と学習は、技術のようにほとんどの人には浸透しませんでした。

  • does today.

    は今日もやっています。

  • And really the Renaissance was only experienced by the richest of the rich and those people,

    そして、本当にルネサンスは金持ちの中の金持ちとそういう人たちだけが経験したことなのです。

  • like painters, who served them.

    絵描きのように、彼らに仕えていた

  • I mean, there were some commercial opportunities, like for framing paintings or binding books,

    絵画の額装とか本の装丁とか、商機はあったんですけどね。

  • but the vast majority of Europeans still lived on farms either as free peasants or tenants.

    しかし、ヨーロッパ人の大多数はまだ自由農奴か借地人として農場に住んでいました。

  • And the rediscovery of Aristotle didn't in any way change their lives, which were governed

    そして、アリストテレスの再発見は、支配されていた彼らの生活を何ら変えるものではありませんでした。

  • by the rising and setting of the sun, and, intellectually, by the Catholic Church.

    太陽の昇りと沈みによって、そして知的には、カトリック教会によって。

  • In fact, probably about 95% of Europeans never encountered the Renaissance's opulence or

    実際には、おそらくヨーロッパ人の約95%はルネサンスの豊かさに遭遇したことはありませんでした。

  • art or modes of thought.

    芸術や思想のモード。

  • We have constructed the Renaissance as important not because it was so central to the 15th

    私たちはルネサンスを重要なものとして構築してきましたが、それは15世紀の中心的なものだったからではありません。

  • century. I mean, at the time Europe wasn't the world's leader in, anything other than

    世紀のことです。当時のヨーロッパは世界のリーダーではありませんでした

  • the tiny business of Atlantic trade.

    大西洋貿易の小さなビジネス。

  • We remember it as important because it matters to us now. It gave us the ninja turtles.

    今の私たちにとって重要なことだからこそ、大切なこととして記憶しているのです。それは私たちにニンジャ・タートルズを与えてくれました。

  • We care about Aristotle and individualism and the Mona Lisa and the possibility that

    アリストテレスと個人主義とモナリザの可能性を気にしながら

  • Michelangelo painted an anatomically correct brain onto the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel,

    ミケランジェロはシスティーナ礼拝堂の天井に解剖学的に正しい脳を描いた。

  • because these things give us a narrative that makes sense.

    これらのことが意味のある物語を与えてくれるからです。

  • Europe was enlightened, and then it was unenlightened, and then it was re-enlightened, and ever since

    ヨーロッパは悟りを開いたが、その後悟りを開いていない、そして再び悟りを開いた、それ以来ずっと

  • it's been the center of art and commerce and history.

    芸術や商業、歴史の中心になっています。

  • You see that cycle of life, death, and rebirth a lot in historical recollection, but it just

    生と死と再生のサイクルを歴史的回想の中でよく目にしますが、ただそれは

  • isn't accurate.

    は正確ではありません。

  • So it's true that many of the ideas introduced to Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries became

    そのため、15世紀から16世紀にかけてヨーロッパに導入されたアイデアの多くが

  • very important.

    とても重要なことです。

  • But remember, when we talk about the Renaissance, we're talking about hundreds of years. I

    でも覚えておいてくれ ルネッサンスの話をする時は 何百年も前の話をしているんだI

  • mean, although they share ninja turtledom, Donatello and Raphael were born 97 years apart.

    つまり、忍者の亀甲を共有しているとはいえ、ドナテッロとラファエルは97年も離れて生まれています。

  • And the Renaissance humanist Petrarch was born in 1304, 229 years before the Renaissance

    そしてルネサンスの人文主義者ペトラルカは、ルネサンスの229年前の1304年に生まれています。

  • humanist Montaigne.

    ヒューマニストのモンテーニュ

  • That is almost as long as the United States has existed. So was the Renaissance a thing?

    それはアメリカが存在していたのとほぼ同じくらいの期間です。ルネッサンスはあったのか?

  • Not really. It was a lot of mutually interdependent things that occurred over centuries. Stupid

    そうでもないんですよ。何世紀にもわたって相互依存的なことがたくさん起きていたのです。愚かな

  • truth always resisting simplicity. Thanks for watching. I'll see you next week.

    真実は常にシンプルさに抵抗していますご覧いただきありがとうございました。また来週お会いしましょう。

Hi, I'm John Green, This is Crash Course: World History and today we're going to talk

こんにちは、私はジョン・グリーンです。今日は、世界史についてお話しします。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 CrashCourse ヨーロッパ オスマン イスラム 学者 貿易

ルネッサンスルネッサンスとは何だったのか?- クラッシュ・コース 世界史 #22

  • 9680 690
    Aurora Yang に公開 2015 年 08 月 12 日
動画の中の単語