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  • Hi everyone, it's Lauren and welcome to

  • another episode in my series on Shakespeare,

  • in today's video

  • I'm going to be talking about how to read Shakespeare,

  • some tips and tricks to help

  • you feel comfortable with the language

  • It's no secret that a lot of people feel

  • quite intimidated by Shakespeare

  • because of the old-fashioned language

  • and because of the fact it's written in verse

  • one of the big barriers is that

  • Shakespeare wasn't really designed to be read,

  • Shakespeare was designed to be performed

  • so it does take a little bit of imagination on our part to work out

  • what the actors are doing on stage whereas

  • in a book you have a lot more direction

  • as to what would be going on with the plot

  • Tip number one is to find a synopsis of the play

  • and read that before you actually read the play itself.

  • A lot of Shakespeare's language is very poetic

  • and there's a lot of imagery in what he writes

  • because you've got to imagine

  • that a lot of these plays were performed outside

  • and there was minimal staging

  • and special effects so what audiences were there for was the poetry

  • and Shakespeare was able to paint a picture for them with his words

  • but that does mean that when you're trying to work out what's going on sometimes

  • characters go off on tangents and talk about something else

  • and while that may be very beautiful

  • it might be completely irrelevant to what is actually happening in the plot in very basic terms,

  • so if you are struggling with Shakespeare's language

  • or you get to a passage that you really don't understand,

  • if you have in the back of your mind a basic outline of the plot

  • you know that as you're reading it if you get lost

  • you'll be able to find your way again quite easily.

  • Tip number two,

  • one of the most important ones is to find

  • some adaptations of Shakespeare,

  • there are tons of films, you can go and see

  • Shakespeare on stage, you can see tv adaptations, film adaptations,

  • I'm sure there are tons of clips on youtube.

  • Seeing an actor perform Shakespeare

  • can really do wonders to break down the barriers of language

  • because they really understand what Shakespeare's words are trying to say

  • and I find it especially helps you

  • to watch an experienced person read Shakespeare

  • because then your ear gets atuned

  • to the rhythm and cadence of Shakespeare which is very similar,

  • he tends to write in iambic pentameter and

  • once you get used to that rhythm of language

  • it makes it a lot easier for you to hear that in your head when you're reading it alone

  • not to mention the fact that Shakespeare's themes are absolutely

  • universal of love and loss and revenge

  • and they are fantastic to watch

  • if you are struggling with reading it,

  • then watching an adaptation can really help bring these things out.

  • A fantastic online resources the No Fear Shakespeare project,

  • so all of Shakespeare's plays

  • are in the public domain and can be found online,

  • if you type in 'No Fear Shakespeare' you will find a website

  • which has every single one of his plays.

  • On one side of the screen you have the original

  • text and on the other side you have a modern-day translation

  • and I find it especially helpful when there are sections of Shakespeare which are prose,

  • which are discussions between people

  • because on this side of the screen you just end up with all of the dick jokes

  • which you would not get on a first read

  • because that colloquialism, that banter

  • something that we've lost in translation

  • interestingly, I find it actually a lot easier to understand Shakespeare when he's doing this high imagery kind of poetic parts of his soliloquies

  • and then when it is just the everyday banter between the servants for example

  • and No Fear Shakespeare t is very helpful with that.

  • There's also a ton of analysis of Shakespeare online

  • if you want to get really deep into the language and what Shakespeare really means,

  • then you can just type in a specific soliloquy and

  • you'll get loads of responses come up

  • and finally I have some examples for you

  • I'm going to help you with this reading experience

  • this is my copy of Romeo and Juliet,

  • you can see that most of it is written in verse.

  • Iambic pentameter is what Shakespeare uses mostly

  • and that means that they are ten syllable lines

  • however that is just the way that it's written on the page to keep it in the rhythm of the verse,

  • if you have a sentence that is longer than ten syllables

  • then it will get to a certain point and then the sentence will continue on another page

  • but that doesn't mean

  • that's how you would read it, or how an actor on stage would actually say the line

  • so for example here is Juliet. You would not read afraid like this -

  • What's in a name? That which we call a rose. By any other word with sweet.

  • So Romeo would were he not Romeo call'd. Retain that dear perfection which he owes.

  • No, no, no! Make sure when you're

  • reading it that you're paying attention to the grammar, to the punctuation

  • and you're reading the sentences off the line

  • and you're not thrown by the indents here.

  • As I've already said another thing that can throw you off your reading experience is the excessive almost use of imagery.

  • I have another example here from Romeo

  • 'But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?

  • It is the east and Juliet is the Sun.

  • Arise fair Sun and kill the envious moon who is already sick and pale with grief that thou, her maid art far more fair than she'

  • so Romeo is just going off on a tangent here

  • because Juliet has just come to the window

  • and he's describing her beauty,

  • he's describing the effect that she's having on him

  • and Shakespeare is using poetry to convey emotions to you

  • but you don't really need to understand this about the Sun and the moon,

  • I mean it is interesting

  • but that's not the point

  • the real point is this - 'but soft!' Hey!

  • hang on one moment, what's going on over there?

  • A light has come through that window over there and it is the east,

  • it's like the dawn and Juliet is the Sun rising and bringing that light the rest of the world

  • later on he says 'It is my lady; O! It is my love:

  • O that she knew she were.

  • She speaks yet she says nothing.

  • What is that her eye discourses?

  • I will answer it

  • I'm too bold, 'tis not to me she speaks.'

  • So through Romeo's words we're actually

  • getting what Juliet is doing, there aren't any stage directions here

  • but he is talking to her,

  • he's wishing that she knew that

  • he was there and he sees that she's talking to herself, looking around the garden,

  • he thinks she can see him

  • he goes to wave to her...Oh no no!

  • So it just takes a slightly more closer look at the text to

  • not only get what Romeo was saying but

  • also to give you a vision of what is happening on stage as well

  • Another example that I really like of the texts really communicating what an actor would be going on stage is

  • this soliloquy from Macbeth,

  • it is just before Macbeth is about to go and kill Duncan

  • and he's having a vision -

  • 'Is this a dagger which I see before me the handle toward my hand?

  • Come let me clutch thee. I have been not and yet I see thee still.

  • Art though not fatal vision sensible to feeling as to sight?

  • Or art thou but a dagger of the mind, a false creation proceeding from the heat-opressed brain?'

  • So not only do we have that Macbeth is seeing a dagger in front of him,

  • but he's trying to grab it and realizing that he can't

  • 'art thou not sensible to feeling as to sight?'

  • like I can see you why can't I feel you?

  • 'I see thee yet in form and palpable as this which now I draw.

  • Though marshall'st me the way that I was going and such an instrument I was to use.'

  • so again I see you there as palpable as this which now I draw - this dagger which I have with me and which i'm drawing from my belt,

  • to me this dagger I see is as real

  • as the one that I'm holding here which

  • the audience can see, and you are showing,

  • 'thou marshall'st me the way' you are showing me the way that I need to go to commit murder

  • so it's always worth bearing in mind

  • that it's a person delivering a speech to the audience,

  • if you try and read it as you would read a normal book

  • then you're only going to get half the story.

  • So I hope that was helpful if Shakespeare is something that you are a little bit nervous about,

  • I know the language can be difficult, the 'thous' the 'thys' the 'th'arts'

  • but it really is quite simple,

  • the English follows exactly the same grammar as we have now,

  • it's just an older form of 'you'

  • these are things that you can look up quite easily

  • and once you understand them

  • it really is just like reading plain English

  • and you won't even notice that they're in the text.

  • So let me know how you feel about Shakespeare in the comments below -

  • are you a complete novice who's a little bit nervous about getting stuck in

  • or are you a Shakespeare aficionado?

  • Do you have any more tips of your own that you can share with everybody else?

  • I will be very happy to answer any more questions and take suggestions

  • if there's anything else that you'd like to

  • learn and i will see you in my next video

  • bye!

Hi everyone, it's Lauren and welcome to

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A2 初級

シェイクスピアの読み方を紹介!「シェイクスピアの読み方」を紹介します。 (How to Read Shakespeare!)

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    EZ Wang に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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