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  • Today I thought I'd go over a general list of things it's best not to do in Japan.

  • Now not all of these are necessarily rude, but if you want to fit in and cause the

  • least amount of trouble then they're things you should take into consideration.

  • It's also possible that you might see Japanese people doing these from time to

  • time,

  • but if that happens keep in mind that they are in fact probably causing

  • trouble themselves.

  • Many of these rules are the result of collectivism in Asian culture.

  • Whereas the West focuses primarily on individualism, Japanese people in

  • particular, though there are always exceptions, almost exclusively put

  • others before themselves.

  • Before you speak, before you act in Japan

  • it's important to consider how that will affect the others around you.

  • To some extent as a foreigner you will always have the magic power to

  • get away with things since you can't be expected to know the culture

  • but there are times when doing something that would've been normal in your home

  • country may surprise, offend or even turn Japanese people away from you.

  • I'll start off with some of the more well-known rules.

  • Don't use your cellphone on buses or trains.

  • This isn't just a courtesy thing--it's actually written on signs.

  • They'll ask you to switch your phone to manner mode,

  • which is a mode that disables all sounds so as not to disturb other people.

  • In general buses and trains are very quiet (except for school buses).

  • Some people suggest that you not talk at all, although many Japanese people up

  • through their college years will still laugh and talk somewhat loudly.

  • You can do it, but you will almost certainly annoy the other passengers.

  • In addition to being loud, you're also not supposed to eat or drink on trains or buses

  • although you probably see people breaking this rule from time to time as well.

  • Somewhat related to this,

  • don't be loud in general no matter where you are.

  • Again you will probably see younger Japanese people being loud at times,

  • but they themselves are being rude.

  • One thing as a foreigner you may have to consciously make yourself aware of is how

  • loudly you're speaking.

  • Even a normal conversational tone for Westerners,

  • and not just Americans, is very loud for Japanese people.

  • If you're not with a Japanese person who is willing to scold you, and you probably

  • won't be unless you're dating someone, no one may ever tell you.

  • But there are times that I have been consciously trying to lower my voice and

  • I've still been too loud.

  • Going along with not causing trouble: don't complain around Japanese people.

  • In fact you should do your best not to get emotional at all.

  • When something bad happens to a Japanese person they tend not to blame something

  • else or feel sorry for themselves.

  • Instead they usually blame themselves even if it's not their fault.

  • This isn't even just a way of being polite; it's how they actually think.

  • Therefore you will find that a lot of Japanese people don't complain hardly at

  • all.

  • A common phrase you likely hear in Japan is "shouganai"

  • which means, "It can't be helped."

  • Is there a long waiting line? Shouganai.

  • Are they sold out? Shouganai.

  • Did someone cut you off? Shouganai.

  • It can't be helped; you just have to accept it.

  • Of course we're all humans so it's acceptable to have a bad day every now and

  • then. But even then you shouldn't raise your voice or get upset about it when talking

  • with a Japanese person.

  • In the West if you're passionately explaining situation that made you upset,

  • we understand that the anger is directed at the situation and not at us.

  • But in Japan Japanese people feel like you're taking your anger out on them.

  • Even when you're upset you should think about how your actions affect others.

  • By getting emotional about it with someone here, you're making them uncomfortable.

  • If something bad happens to you, it's best to just laugh and brush it off.

  • A few specific things you should try not to do:

  • Taking pictures of strangers in Japan. Japanese people greatly value their privacy.

  • Oftentimes if they catch others in their pictures they will blur out their faces

  • before using the pictures for anything.

  • With this in mind that doesn't mean you can't ever take pictures, though!

  • Of course as a tourist you can take pictures of busy areas and the people around there.

  • Just try to find a balance where you're not bothering anyone.

  • Also you can't really customize your food orders here. You can try asking for them to

  • remove just one thing, but you can't ask for them to take off this, add

  • something else, substitute these things or cook it this way; that's not really done

  • here and it would be really confusing for your waitress and cook.

  • Once your food arrives you can pick off something if you don't like it,

  • although it's a bit childish and Japanese people will wonder why you ordered

  • something if you didn't like it in the first place.

  • Again if you're a woman don't show off your cleavage.

  • You can show off as much leg as you want, but not only should you not show off your

  • cleavage,

  • but you shouldn't show off that area at all, even if you can't see anything.

  • Even above your chest, anything that's below your armpit is probably too low cut.

  • You may see Japanese women from time to time who have low cut shirts,

  • but they're not giving off a very good image of themselves and you probably don't

  • want that image associated with yourself.

  • It's a highly sexualized area, even if you can't see anything.

  • Also do not carry pocket knives!

  • It's actually illegal to carry a knife with a blade longer than 5.5cm,

  • or 2.25in, so anything that's this long.

  • And you can get in a lot of trouble for it. If you have a pocket knife I recommend just

  • leaving it at home. I don't think it's worth it to bring it.

  • But in general in Japan just try not to be too noticeable.

  • As a foreigner you're going to be noticeable anyway,

  • but do your best not to stand out beyond that.

  • As always we all make mistakes and many of these things are done by younger

  • Japanese people anyway so don't worry about it too much!

  • Especially if you're in a tourist area or a large city,

  • people will be more used to foreigners so feel free to be yourself for the most part.

  • Just try to consider how your actions are going to affect the others around you.

  • If you have any questions or comments on this video leave it in the comment

  • section below.

  • Next video I'm going to talk about what over-the-counter drugs you can get in

  • Japan, how much they are, what drugs you should consider bringing,

  • and what drugs are illegal to bring to Japan.

Today I thought I'd go over a general list of things it's best not to do in Japan.

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A2 初級

日本でやってはいけないこと (What NOT to do in Japan)

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    阿多賓 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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