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  • Wow. This book is so good. It's about...I can't remember. How many times have you read

  • something and then, five seconds later, you have to go back and reread that same page

  • because you can't remember what you read? Here's the solution for that. Check this out.

  • Hey, guys, Ron White here. Now, we've all been there. We've all read a page and then,

  • two seconds later, we have to go back and reread that page because we have no idea what

  • we just read. Here's the solution for that, and this process can be broken down into six

  • easy steps.

  • Let's start with step number one. Don't try to memorize as you're reading. But, instead,

  • read with a highlighter or a marker and underline or highlight the key words as you are reading,

  • or take notes as you're reading. But, don't try to memorize as you read.

  • Number two, is you need a technique or a tool called the Mind Palace, or it's called the

  • Method of Loci. Essentially, what it is, is you remember a map of a room. Stand in the

  • doorway of every room in your house and number five pieces of furniture in each room. The

  • first room, you [inaudible] one, two, three, four, five. It might be desk, bed, TV, picture,

  • plant. Then go to the next room and number that room six, seven, eight, nine, and ten.

  • Good things will be desks, or chairs, or computers, or windows, or showers, or sinks. This is

  • your Mind Palace and this is actually going to hold the data that you are memorizing in

  • the book, which lead us to step number three.

  • Step number three is, whatever you want to remember, you need to turn it into a picture.

  • Let's say you're reading a book about Abraham Lincoln. The picture for Abraham Lincoln could

  • be a penny because Abraham Lincoln is on the penny. And maybe you want to remember he was

  • born in Kentucky, so you're going to need a picture for Kentucky. Maybe you would use

  • the Kentucky Derby. And maybe you want to remember he was the 16th President. You need

  • to create a picture for 16 and you might use a car for that because you get your driver's

  • license when you're 16 years old. So, everything you have highlighted or everything you have

  • underlined, you're going to create pictures for to remember those highlighted or underlined

  • words. Pretty easy, right.

  • All right. Let's move on to step number four. Step number four is, is you use the pieces

  • of furniture in your room to store the data. The first point that you want to memorize

  • is Abraham Lincoln was born in Kentucky. So, you think of a penny and a penny is racing

  • around the Kentucky Derby. Now, you take picture and you put it on the first piece of furniture

  • in your house. Maybe the first piece of furniture in your house is a table, so a penny racing

  • around the Kentucky Derby. The second thing you want to remember is Abraham Lincoln was

  • the 16th president. So, you see a penny for Lincoln, and the penny is driving a car for

  • 16, and you see that on the second piece of furniture, which may be the refrigerator.

  • You see a penny driving a car around the refrigerator. Every point that you have underlined, you

  • turn into a picture, and you would see on pieces of furniture around your house -- five

  • in a room. And that's how you remember points from a book.

  • All right, guys. Let's go on to step number five. Step five is simply, if you want to

  • remember five points from every chapter, you use one room to represent every chapter because

  • you have five pieces of furniture in every room. If you want to remember ten points from

  • a chapter, easy enough. You just use two rooms to represent that chapter. And, if you want

  • to remember 15 points from a chapter, easy enough. You just use three rooms for that

  • chapter.

  • So, those are the five steps that you need to memorize what you read. If you want to

  • remember dates, like you're reading a history book, there is an optional sixth step. To

  • remember dates, you need to create pictures for the date. For example, maybe you use a

  • Cupid for Valentine's Day, for February. For March, you might use soldiers marching to

  • remember the month of March. April showers to remember the month of April. So, that's

  • an optional sixth step, creating pictures for the months to remember important dates

  • if you're reading a history book.

  • So, in recap, number one, don't memorize as you read. But, instead, highlight or underline

  • as you read. Number two, create a Mind Palace, locations in a room where you're going to

  • store the data. Number three, turn whatever you want to recall into a picture. See it

  • as an animated image. Number four, store those pictures on the pieces of furniture around

  • your house in your Mind Palace to remember the details of what you read. Number five,

  • you segment the chapters. You put everything about one chapter in one room. And then, finally,

  • the optional sixth step, if you want to remember dates, you just need to create pictures for

  • those dates.

  • This is a simple method. It's called the Mind Palace. Sherlock Holmes used it in his books.

  • So, it's completely free. Click the link right here, or click the link below, and I'll see

  • you on the next page as you get this Sherlock Holmes Mind Palace training.

  • All right guys, thanks for watching. I'm going to show you some bloopers here in a second.

  • But, before you do that, click the Subscribe button right here. You're going to want to

  • get plenty more of these memory training videos. Click it right here and subscribe.

  • Wow. I am reading this great book here on the history of America. Did you know that,

  • umHow many times have you read some -- uh, that's kind of jumpy there.

Wow. This book is so good. It's about...I can't remember. How many times have you read

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A2 初級

あなたが読んだものを記憶する - あなたが読んだものを記憶する方法! (Remember What You Read - How To Memorize What You Read!)

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    golemant に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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