Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • 10,000 years ago, the average human life lasted just over 30 years, and then a hundred years ago that number was up to 50, and if you were born in the last few decades in the developed world, then your life expectancy is 80 years.

    1万年前、人間の平均寿命は30年強だったが、100年前には50年になり、ここ数十年の間に生まれた先進国の人は80歳になっている。

  • But that is of course assuming that no major breakthroughs happen during your lifetime that can slow the process of aging, and that may be a very bad assumption.

    しかし、それはもちろん、あなたが生きている間に加齢のプロセスを遅らせるような大きなブレークスルーが起こらないという前提であり、それは非常に悪い仮定かもしれません。

  • There's a new series on National Geographic Channel which was developed with GE and the show's creators wanted to present my take on aging, so I'm here at the GE Global Research Centre to talk to principal scientist Dr. Fiona Ginty.

    GEと共同開発したナショナルジオグラフィックチャンネルの新シリーズで、番組制作者が私の加齢に対する考え方を紹介したいというので、GEグローバル・リサーチ・センターに来て、主任科学者のフィオナ・ギンティ博士に話を聞きました。

  • And this would be kind of an example of, you know, one of the types of images we would generate, so...

    これは、私たちが生成する画像の種類の一つの例で、...

  • - What are we looking at here? - So these are our cells that are actively dividing, and these are cells that are heading on their way to death or apoptosis.

    - ここでは何を見ているのでしょうか?- これらは活発に分裂している細胞であり、これらは死やアポトーシスに向かっている細胞です。

  • Aging is not recognized as a disease. I mean, there are plenty of diseases we do acknowledge like diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer's, and at their core, aging may be responsible for all of them.

    老化は病気として認識されていません。つまり、糖尿病や心臓病、アルツハイマー病など、認められている病気はたくさんありますが、その根幹には加齢が関わっているのかもしれません。

  • And yet aging seems natural because it's something that we do from birth and for a while it makes us better, bigger, stronger, faster, more intelligent.

    しかし、加齢は自然なことのように思えます。なぜならば、それは生まれたときから行っていることであり、しばらくの間は、人間をより良く、より大きく、より強く、より速く、より知的にするものだからです。

  • But then at some point in your life, it reverses and aging makes our bodies decay and degrade. And why is that? Why do we have to age? Why do our bodies have to decay?

    しかし、人生のある時点でそれは逆転し、加齢によって私たちの体は衰え、劣化していきます。それはなぜか?なぜ人は歳をとらなければならないのでしょうか?なぜ私たちの体は衰えなければならないのでしょうか?

  • Well, scientists are now realizing there is a fundamental cellular mechanism at the heart of aging.

    現在、科学者たちは、老化の核心となる基本的な細胞メカニズムがあることに気付いています。

  • Do we age at the macroscopic level because our cells are aging at the microscopic level?

    私たちがマクロ的に老化するのは、細胞がミクロ的に老化しているからでしょうか?

  • To a great extent, yes. There's only a finite number of times a cell will divide.

    ある程度はそうですね。細胞が分裂する回数は限られています。

  • A key discovery was made by a biologist named Hayflick. He was studying normal human cells and what he found was that they can only divide a finite number of times, on average, it's about 50.

    重要な発見をしたのは、ヘイフリックという生物学者です。彼は人間の正常な細胞を研究していましたが、その結果、細胞が分裂できる回数は限られていて、平均して50回程度だということがわかりました。

  • Beyond that, the cell becomes senescent, which means it's an aged cell. It can divide no longer.

    それ以上になると、細胞は老化していきます。これ以上、細胞は分裂できません。

  • It lives for a little while but it's the accumulation of these senescent cells in our bodies that leads to aging on the macroscopic scale.

    少しの間は生きていますが、この老化した細胞が体内に蓄積されることで、マクロ的には老化につながるのです。

  • So it's as though cells have this little timer inside them that tells them when to stop dividing. But how do they know, and what is that timer?

    つまり、細胞の中には、分裂を止めるタイミングを知らせる小さなタイマーがあるようなのです。しかし、どうやってそれを知ることができるのか、そしてそのタイマーとは何なのか?

  • - So, telomeres are like how your shoelaces have, you know, a little bit of plastic at the end to stop them from fraying.

    - テロメアとは、靴ひもの先に、ほつれないように少しだけプラスチックがついているようなものです。

  • - So telomeres are like the ends of your shoelaces... - But for chromosomes? - But for chromosomes.

    - テロメアは靴ひもの先のようなものか...。- でも染色体には?- でも染色体にとっては

  • So they keep the chromosome together and they stop it sticking to other chromosomes.

    染色体を一緒に保ち、他の染色体とくっつくのを阻止します。

  • So every time a cell divides, it loses some of the telomere. They estimate about 200 base pairs.

    そのため、細胞が分裂するたびにテロメアの一部が失われていきます。推定で約200塩基対とのこと。

  • Why is that? Why can't it just copy to the end?

    なぜだろう?なぜ最後までコピーできないのか?

  • You know, it's just sort of really the mechanics of it, you know, there's only so much space when DNA polymerase does its job of replicating. - When it's copying? - Yeah.

    DNAポリメラーゼが複製の仕事をするときには、スペースは限られているのです。- コピーするとき?- そうです。

  • So the telomere, and the telomere getting shorter is like your molecular clock. The cellular clock inside each cell that tells it how many times it has divided.

    つまり、テロメア、そしてテロメアが短くなることは、分子時計のようなものなのです。各細胞の中にある細胞時計で、細胞が何回分裂したかを教えてくれます。

  • - Would you wana have your telomeres measured? - Well, people do get their telomeres measured.

    - テロメアを測ってみたいと思いませんか?- まあ、テロメアを測る人はいますよ。

  • There have been associations made with lifestyle, with exercise, showing that longer telomeres are associated with a more active lifestyle, exercise.

    ライフスタイルや運動との関連性も指摘されており、テロメアの長さは、より活動的なライフスタイルや運動と関連していることがわかっています。

  • What if there was a way to stop the telomeres from shortening? If we could do that, maybe the cells would live forever.

    もし、テロメアが短くなるのを止める方法があったら?もしそれができれば、細胞は永遠に生き続けることができるかもしれません。

  • - There's another enzyme involved called telomerase, and it keeps rebuilding, like, it doesn't let the telomere ever shrink, so it... - It rebuilds the telomere? - Right, exactly.

    - テロメラーゼと呼ばれる別の酵素が関与していて、テロメアを再構築しています。テロメアが縮むことはありません。- そう、その通りです。

  • There is one animal that doesn't seem to age, and that is the lobster.

    老いを感じさせない動物がいます。それはロブスターです。

  • It just gets bigger over time. It doesn't get weaker and its chromosomes don't change. It has long telomeres that do not shorten, so it only dies when it gets eaten by something else, like us.

    時間の経過とともに大きくなるだけです。弱くなることはなく、染色体も変化しません。長いテロメアを持っていて短くならないので、人間のような他のものに食べられたときにだけ死ぬのです。

  • So how can we be more like a lobster?

    では、どうすればロブスターのようになれるのでしょうか?

  • Some people would say maybe, "I want my telomerase to be higher for longer." Would that help? I mean, would that keep us younger?

    人によっては、"テロメラーゼをもっと長く高くしたい "と言うかもしれません。それは役に立つでしょうか?つまり、若さを保つことができるのでしょうか?

  • I mean it's balance because, you know, in cancer, you've got a perfect example of telomerase being active and it becomes an unregulated growth situation.

    癌の場合、テロメラーゼが活性化して無秩序に成長するという典型的な例があるので、バランスが重要なのです。

  • This is the double-edged sword of telomeres and telomerase.

    これがテロメアとテロメラーゼの諸刃の剣です。

  • Cancer cells have really long telomeres, and they can divide indefinitely, and that is the problem with cancer: cancer is dividing cells that won't stop and they won't die.

    がん細胞はテロメアが非常に長く、無限に分裂することができます。それががんの問題点であり、がんは分裂している細胞が止まらず、死なないのです。

  • So, in a way, cancer is the immortal cell living within us.

    つまり、ある意味では、がんは私たちの中にある不死身の細胞なのです。

  • So maybe we've developed the aging process, maybe we have telomeres that shorten for a very good reason because otherwise, they could become cancerous.

    つまり、私たちは老化プロセスを発展させてきたのかもしれませんし、テロメアが短くなるのには正当な理由があるのかもしれません。そうでなければ、がん化する可能性があるからです。

  • So one of the theories there is that the cells divide that limited number of times because it stops them from accumulating damage that may be detrimental.

    そこで一つの説として、細胞が限られた回数だけ分裂することで、有害なダメージを蓄積するのを防ぐことができると考えられています。

  • - So there is some... - It might cause them to become cancer. - Exactly.

    - だから、多少は・・・。- 癌になってしまうかもしれない。- その通りです。

  • Over the past hundred years, developments in medicine have increased human lifespan more than we could have imagined, and I can only expect that the next hundred years will bring similarly incredible results.

    この100年、医学の発展は人間の寿命を想像以上に延ばしてきましたが、次の100年も同じような素晴らしい結果が得られると期待しています。

  • I'm not sure where or how they will take place, but you can bet that your life expectancy today will not be the actual age at which you die.

    どこで、どのように行われるかはわかりませんが、今の平均寿命が実際に死ぬ年齢ではないことは間違いありません。

  • If you wanna find out more about the future of aging, well, then you should definitely check out the episode of Breakthrough which was directed by Ron Howard.

    老いの未来について知りたい方は、ぜひロン・ハワード監督の「ブレイクスルー」のエピソードをご覧ください。

  • That's airing on Sunday, November 29 at 9/8c. That is just one of six episodes of Breakthrough which was developed by National Geographic Channel and GE.

    それは11月29日(日)9/8cに放送されます。これは、ナショナル・ジオグラフィック・チャンネルとGEが開発した「ブレイクスルー」の6つのエピソードのうちの1つです。

  • So, I wanna thank them for supporting Veritasium, and I wanna thank you for watching.

    ベリタシウムをサポートしてくれた彼らに感謝したいし、視聴してくれた皆さんにも感謝したいと思います。

  • Oh, and I also made a video about the future of energy. It's over on the GE YouTube channel, so go check it out!

    それと、未来のエネルギーについてのビデオも作りました。GE の YouTube チャンネルにアップされていますので、ぜひご覧ください。

10,000 years ago, the average human life lasted just over 30 years, and then a hundred years ago that number was up to 50, and if you were born in the last few decades in the developed world, then your life expectancy is 80 years.

1万年前、人間の平均寿命は30年強だったが、100年前には50年になり、ここ数十年の間に生まれた先進国の人は80歳になっている。

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 テロメア 細胞 老化 分裂 染色 がん

【英語で雑学】老化を科学的に説明!人は老いずに永遠に生きられるの?

  • 2798 176
    李佳憶 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語