Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Computer, turn on

  • Load: Charlotte and Kent Garden Program.

  • Resume chapter.

  • Isn't it lovely that Mr. Collins isn't in the garden today?

  • (laughter)

  • Virtual reality.

  • Virtual reality is a rich, visual, multi-sensory,

  • computer-simulated environment

  • in which we could immerse ourselves

  • and with which we could interact.

  • For some time now, it's been possible

  • to construct super realistic 3D models for us to fly around in,

  • interact in virtual worlds,

  • a la gaming,

  • don head-mounted displays, and haptic gloves,

  • even walk around rooms, life-sized rooms, in projection spaces.

  • In science fiction films, too,

  • they've shown us how virtual reality may play out.

  • Academics like Janet Murray, who wrote the book "Hamlet on the Holodeck",

  • have created design frameworks

  • to help us design virtual reality experiences.

  • And technologists, like Ivan Sutherland,

  • who first invented the head-mounted display in 1968 in MIT,

  • and Jaron Lanier, who founded VPL research

  • and indeed popularized the term "virtual reality",

  • have created the building blocks for the virtual reality industry.

  • But despite this big headway,

  • (laughter)

  • the technology for many years just wasn't there yet.

  • It was "unwieldy," to say the least,

  • it made you throw up,

  • and it was expensive for mass consumption.

  • Fast forward September 1, 2012.

  • A young guy by the name of Palmer Lucky,

  • and yes, this was in his basement,

  • invented a head-mounted display that solves the problem of lag.

  • Virtual reality without nausea.

  • He launches this Kickstarter campaign

  • and raises over $2 million, way above the $250,000 that was his goal.

  • Occulus Rift, his company was called,

  • was then, two years later, bought by Facebook for ...

  • Can anyone shout in the audience?

  • $2 billion!

  • Same time this year, you're going to be able to buy an Occulus Rift headset

  • for a price point that's a little less than the iPhone 6.

  • So many people in the interactive story-telling community

  • have been waiting for this for a very long time,

  • including myself.

  • When Norman Jewison invited me to create the new media laboratory

  • at the Canadian Film Center some twenty years ago,

  • a skunk works for the creation of visual forms of storytelling,

  • I was already dreaming about starring in my own "Pride and Prejudice."

  • Thank you, TEDx, for letting me make one.

  • But it wasn't really until recently

  • that we've started to explore forms in the virtual space,

  • like Google Glass applications or augmented reality applications,

  • companies that were accelerating.

  • And most recently, we've actually developed

  • our first Occulus Rift experience,

  • with a company called Occupy VR,

  • with Blair Reno and Jay Lee WIlliams,

  • where we took our award-winning interactive storytelling project

  • called "Body Mind Change," starring David Cronenberg,

  • and stuck it in this virtual reality space.

  • It's decidedly creepy, and it makes you feel like

  • you're living inside this dream.

  • So, I know that we're poised along this trajectory

  • of creating virtual reality applications, tools, and experiences.

  • But, as I was planning our future strategies

  • and how we would help develop the virtual reality industry,

  • I was struck by how...like it was 1994.

  • I had this feeling that it was like 1994 when Netscape,

  • the first commercial web browser, .was launched.

  • And this feeling made me pause and take stock.

  • And so what I want to do now is extract

  • the lessons of the internet experience of the past twenty years,

  • because I think these lessons will help guide us in the creation

  • of the commercial virtual reality industry in the next twenty years.

  • So let's go on to the first lesson:

  • Business model.

  • For this, I need to use a metaphor,

  • and it's a bit of a thought experiment,

  • so I need your help.

  • I want you guys to look around you,

  • look at the stage, look at what's in front of you.

  • Now imagine you're in a transparent bubble.

  • Everything looks the same as when I asked you to observe this space.

  • Now imagine that instead of being able to see

  • through the bubble, into the stage,

  • that an exact image of the same space

  • is being projected onto the surface of the bubble.

  • Again, everything looks the same.

  • But, of course, it's not the same.

  • It's virtual reality. And this image that you're seeing displayed on the surface

  • is a manufactured and synthetic one.

  • And we rely on the person who's doing that displaying

  • to send us an accurate image.

  • Now it's clear that in this situation,

  • we have absolutely no idea if what we're seeing,

  • this virtual reality that we're experiencing,

  • is indeed accurate or true.

  • Now imagine that the person who's projecting this image

  • is not only doing that, but collecting information about you,

  • about how you're responding to this image.

  • It would be like you being Jim Carrey in the Truman Show

  • Now the people on the balcony there might go,

  • "Well, Ana, we've seen that movie before."

  • But, in fact, it should feel familiar,

  • because vast areas of the internet

  • resemble this, but in a low-tech way.

  • The reality that we see, when we look at our Facebook homepage,

  • has been carefully constructed by Facebook.

  • The Google search results that Google displays

  • are different for everyone.

  • In effect, on the Internet, we all see a different version of reality.

  • Now the reason for this is that technology is not neutral.

  • In fact, it never has been, and it never will be.

  • The advent of the internet was supposed to bring

  • this democratized access to rich communications and information

  • through e-mail and the web, etc.

  • But instead, what we've seen, that's been driving

  • the evolution of the internet economically,

  • is the relentless focus on the internet user as consumer.

  • Now, a good way to understand this even more clearly

  • is to use another framework. The "moments of truth" framework

  • popularized by Proctor & Gamble.

  • As their CEO, A.G. Laughley, once said,

  • "The moment that the consumer stands in front of a store shelf

  • is the first moment of truth.

  • Without that moment, there will be no second moment

  • when the consumer consumes the products and benefits from them."

  • Now what happens when we insert the internet into this framework?

  • This image that you see, in some retail circles

  • would be called the "Zero" moment of truth.

  • The time at which you recognize you need something,

  • and you'd go online and search for it.

  • That behavior now is called "Googling it."

  • When we add social media to the mix,

  • you have the third moment of truth,

  • where you love a product so much

  • that you can't help but Tweet about it

  • or post it on Facebook.

  • So, really, to go back to this business model,

  • the business model of Google, Facebook, Pinterest,

  • and the firms who dominate the Internet today,

  • is build upon the successful manipulation

  • of the first and third moments of truth.

  • And they've become so good at this

  • as they learn more and more about us.

  • As they learn more and more about you.

  • Now, they didn't do this overnight.

  • What we've actually seen over the course of the last 20 years

  • is the gradual incursion of the large providers

  • into more and more of you,

  • sucking up data at a more and more granular level.

  • Now the data that I'm talking about includes,

  • at first, search behavior, then it was instant messaging content,

  • click-throughs, Likes, location,

  • and now, even today, since we all know that we live in a post-Snowden world,

  • our own private e-mail content.

  • The effect of this is that more and more of what you do

  • has become the basis of a microtransaction

  • The addition of one more data point

  • carrying potential economic value for the large data warehouses,

  • leading one-time CEO Eric Schmidt to remark,

  • "Technology will be so good, it will be very hard for people

  • to watch or consume something that has not, in some sense,

  • been tailored for them."

  • So this brings us to lesson 2.

  • So this is where we are now.

  • Right?

  • Now what happens when we bring VR into this situation?

  • VR into this situation?

  • To life inside the bubble?