Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So I'm a woman with chronic schizophrenia.

    何百日もの間

  • I've spent hundreds of days

    精神病院で過ごしてきました

  • in psychiatric hospitals.

    人生のほとんどを精神病棟に

  • I might have ended up spending

    隔離されそうになりながら

  • most of my life on the back ward of a hospital,

    違う人生を歩みました

  • but that isn't how my life turned out.

    実際のところ 30年近くもの間

  • In fact, I've managed to stay clear of hospitals

    精神病院を何とか避けてきました

  • for almost three decades,

    これは最も誇りに思っていることです

  • perhaps my proudest accomplishment.

    精神疾患との闘いをずっと

  • That's not to say that I've remained clear

    避けてきたのではありません

  • of all psychiatric struggles.

    エール大学ロースクールを卒業して 初めて法律の仕事に就いてから

  • After I graduated from the Yale Law School and

    かかりつけの精神分析医だった ホワイト先生は

  • got my first law job, my New Haven analyst, Dr. White,

    数カ月後に診療を辞めると告げました

  • announced to me that he was going to close his practice

    私がニューヘブンを去ろうとした

  • in three months, several years

    数年前のことでした

  • before I had planned to leave New Haven.

    先生にはとても世話になっていました

  • White had been enormously helpful to me,

    彼が離れていくと思うだけで 大変打ちのめされました

  • and the thought of his leaving

    彼が離れていくと思うだけで 大変打ちのめされました

  • shattered me.

    親友のスティーブが

  • My best friend Steve,

    私に何か酷いことが起こったと感じ取って

  • sensing that something was terribly wrong,

    ニューヘブンまで飛んできてくれました

  • flew out to New Haven to be with me.

    自分の著作から引用します

  • Now I'm going to quote from some of my writings:

    「アパートの扉を開けました

  • "I opened the door to my studio apartment.

    スティーブは後にこう言うでしょう

  • Steve would later tell me that,

    私の精神疾患をずっと診てきたけど

  • for all the times he had seen me psychotic, nothing

    この日の私は最悪な状態だった と

  • could have prepared him for what he saw that day.

    1週間以上 ほとんど何も食べませんでした

  • For a week or more, I had barely eaten.

    私はやせ衰え

  • I was gaunt. I walked

    歩く足は棒のようでした

  • as though my legs were wooden.

    私の表情はまるで能面でした

  • My face looked and felt like a mask.

    アパートのカーテンを一日中閉じていたので

  • I had closed all the curtains in the apartment, so

    アパートのカーテンを一日中閉じていたので

  • in the middle of the day

    アパートの中は真っ暗でした

  • the apartment was in near total darkness.

    悪臭が漂い 部屋は荒れ放題でした

  • The air was fetid, the room a shambles.

    スティーブは弁護士かつ心理学者で

  • Steve, both a lawyer and a psychologist, has treated

    重度の精神疾患の患者を多数診てきましたが

  • many patients with severe mental illness, and to this day

    これほど重体な患者は見たことないと言うでしょう

  • he'll say I was as bad as any he had ever seen.

    私は『こんにちは』と言い ソファに戻りました

  • 'Hi,' I said, and then I returned to the couch,

    そのまま座ってしばらく黙っていました

  • where I sat in silence for several moments.

    『スティーブ 来てくれてありがとう

  • 'Thank you for coming, Steve.

    崩れつつある世界 言葉 声

  • Crumbling world, word, voice.

    時計を止めて 時間が 時間がきたから』

  • Tell the clocks to stop.

    時計を止めて 時間が 時間がきたから』

  • Time is. Time has come.'

    『ホワイト先生が行ってしまうんだね』 スティーブは陰鬱に言いました

  • 'White is leaving,' Steve said somberly.

    『私はお墓行きよ 深刻よ』 私は嘆きました

  • 'I'm being pushed into a grave. The situation is grave,' I moan.

    『重力が私を引き寄せている

  • 'Gravity is pulling me down.

    怖いわ みんな逃げてと言って』」

  • I'm scared. Tell them to get away.'"

    若い頃から 私は3回ほど

  • As a young woman, I was in a psychiatric hospital

    精神病院に長期入院してきました

  • on three different occasions for lengthy periods.

    医師は私を統合失調症と診断し

  • My doctors diagnosed me with chronic schizophrenia,

    予後は「深刻」だと宣告しました

  • and gave me a prognosis of "grave."

    要するに 介護施設に入れられ

  • That is, at best, I was expected to live in a board and care,

    単調な労働をする運命でした

  • and work at menial jobs.

    幸運にも そうはなりませんでした

  • Fortunately, I did not actually

    幸運にも そうはなりませんでした

  • enact that grave prognosis.

    私は南カリフォルニア大学ロースクールの

  • Instead, I'm a chaired Professor of Law, Psychology

    法学 心理学 精神医学教授です

  • and Psychiatry at the USC Gould School of Law,

    良き友人たちに恵れました

  • I have many close friends

    最愛の夫であるウィルもここに来ています

  • and I have a beloved husband, Will, who's here with us today.

    (拍手) ありがとうございます

  • (Applause) Thank you.

    彼は紛れもなく 私の人生のスターです

  • He's definitely the star of my show.

    これから 私が精神疾患になった経過と

  • I'd like to share with you how that happened, and also

    その体験をお話しします

  • describe my experience of being psychotic.

    前置きしますが これは私の体験談です

  • I hasten to add that it's my experience,

    みんな 精神疾患の症状は違います

  • because everyone becomes psychotic in his or her own way.

    まずは 統合失調症の定義から始めます

  • Let's start with the definition of schizophrenia.

    統合失調症は脳の病気です

  • Schizophrenia is a brain disease.

    それはれっきとした精神病で

  • Its defining feature is psychosis, or being

    つまり 現実感が喪失されます

  • out of touch with reality.

    妄想と幻覚が この病気の特徴です

  • Delusions and hallucinations

    妄想と幻覚が この病気の特徴です

  • are hallmarks of the illness.

    妄想とは ありもしないことへの誤った固定観念で

  • Delusions are fixed and false beliefs that aren't responsive

    幻覚とは ありもしない誤った知覚です

  • to evidence, and hallucinations are false sensory experiences.

    例えば 私が精神疾患のときは

  • For example, when I'm psychotic I often have

    頭の中で何十万人もの人たちを 殺害したという妄想を経験します

  • the delusion that I've killed hundreds of thousands

    頭の中で何十万人もの人たちを 殺害したという妄想を経験します

  • of people with my thoughts.

    頭の中で核爆発が起きると 考えることもあります

  • I sometimes have the idea that

    頭の中で核爆発が起きると 考えることもあります

  • nuclear explosions are about to be set off in my brain.

    幻覚もあります

  • Occasionally, I have hallucinations,

    振り返ると男がナイフを 振り上げていたこともあります

  • like one time I turned around and saw a man

    振り返ると男がナイフを 振り上げていたこともあります

  • with a raised knife.

    目が覚めている間に悪夢を 見ると想像してください

  • Imagine having a nightmare while you're awake.

    しばしば発話と思考が 制御不能になり

  • Often, speech and thinking become disorganized

    支離滅裂になります

  • to the point of incoherence.

    何とか連想して 似たような言葉を並べますが

  • Loose associations involves putting together words

    何の意味も成さず 言葉がごちゃ混ぜになり

  • that may sound a lot alike but don't make sense,

    「ワードサラダ」と呼ばれる状態になります

  • and if the words get jumbled up enough, it's called "word salad."

    統合失調症は普通考えるような

  • Contrary to what many people think, schizophrenia is not

    多重人格や人格分裂とは異なります

  • the same as multiple personality disorder or split personality.

    統合失調症は 心が分裂するのでなく 粉々になるのです

  • The schizophrenic mind is not split, but shattered.

    みなさん路上生活者を 見たことがあるでしょう

  • Everyone has seen a street person,

    だらしなく げっそりとして

  • unkempt, probably ill-fed,

    ビルの外に立っては 独り言をつぶやいたり

  • standing outside of an office building muttering

    叫んでいます

  • to himself or shouting.

    このような人は おそらく何らかの統合失調症です

  • This person is likely to have some form of schizophrenia.

    しかし 統合失調症は

  • But schizophrenia presents itself across a wide array

    様々な経済社会層に見られ

  • of socioeconomic status, and there are people

    正規雇用者で責任ある立場の専門職が

  • with the illness who are full-time professionals

    この病気を患う事もあります

  • with major responsibilities.

    数年前 私は

  • Several years ago, I decided

    自分の経験と遍歴を書き記すことにしました

  • to write down my experiences and my personal journey,

    今日は それに加えて私の内情を

  • and I want to share some more of that story with you today

    みなさんにお話したいと思います

  • to convey the inside view.

    それは エール大学ロースクール1年生の

  • So the following episode happened the seventh week

    1学期 7週間目のことでした

  • of my first semester of my first year at Yale Law School.

    著作から引用します

  • Quoting from my writings:

    「同級生のレベルとヴァルと私は 金曜の晩に

  • "My two classmates, Rebel and Val, and I had made the date

    ロースクールの図書館で落ち合い

  • to meet in the law school library on Friday night

    一緒に覚書の宿題をすることにしました

  • to work on our memo assignment together.

    しかし 取り掛かってすぐ 私は

  • But we didn't get far before I was talking in ways

    意味不明な話をし始めました

  • that made no sense.

    『覚書は神の言葉だ』 私は告げました

  • 'Memos are visitations,' I informed them.

    『そこにはポイントがある 頭上にある

  • 'They make certain points. The point is on your head.

    パットが言ってたのよ 人殺しでもしたの?』

  • Pat used to say that. Have you killed you anyone?'

    レベルとヴァルは 顔面に水を

  • Rebel and Val looked at me

    浴びたような目付きで私を見ました

  • as if they or I had been

    浴びたような目付きで私を見ました

  • splashed in the face with cold water.

    『エリン 一体何を言っているの?』

  • 'What are you talking about, Elyn?'

    『ええ 分かってるわ いつものこと 何が誰 誰が何

  • 'Oh, you know, the usual. Who's what, what's who,

    天国と地獄 ねえ 屋根の上に行きましょう

  • heaven and hell. Let's go out on the roof.

    平らだし 安全だから』

  • It's a flat surface. It's safe.'

    レベルとヴァルは 私についてきて

  • Rebel and Val followed

    私に何があったのかと聞きました

  • and they asked what had gotten into me.

    『これは本当の私よ』 私は頭上で

  • 'This is the real me,' I announced,

    手を振りながら言いました

  • waving my arms above my head.

    そして 金曜日の夜遅くに

  • And then, late on a Friday night, on the roof

    エール大学ロースクールの屋根の上で

  • of the Yale Law School,

    私は歌いだしました それも大声で

  • I began to sing, and not quietly either.

    『フロリダにおいで いい天気よ ブッシュさん

  • 'Come to the Florida sunshine bush.

    ねえ 踊りましょうよ?』

  • Do you want to dance?'

    『クスリやってハイになってるの?』 一人が言いました

  • 'Are you on drugs?' one asked. 'Are you high?'

    『私がハイ? そんなことないわよ クスリもやってないし

  • 'High? Me? No way, no drugs.

    フロリダにおいで いい天気よ ブッシュさん

  • Come to the Florida sunshine bush,

    そこにはレモンがあってさ それが悪魔になってさ

  • where there are lemons, where they make demons.'

    『怖い人ね』 一人が言いました そしてレベルとヴァルは

  • 'You're frightening me,' one of them said, and Rebel and Val

    図書館に戻って行きました

  • headed back into the library.

    私は肩をすくめ 二人を追いました

  • I shrugged and followed them.

    中に入ると二人に尋ねました

  • Back inside, I asked my classmates if they were

    宿題を見て私みたいに言葉が

  • having the same experience of words jumping around

    次々飛び出す経験ってないって

  • our cases as I was.

    『誰かが私の分身に入り込んだ気がするの』 と言いました

  • 'I think someone's infiltrated my copies of the cases,' I said.

    『関節を囲ってるんじゃないかな

  • 'We've got to case the joint.

    関節ってのは信じないけど

  • I don't believe in joints, but

    体をつなげているからね』」

  • they do hold your body together.'" --

    意味のない連想の一例です

  • It's an example of loose associations. --

    「結局 私は寮に戻りました

  • "Eventually I made my way back to my dorm room,

    しかし 私は落ち着けませんでした

  • and once there, I couldn't settle down.

    頭の中は騒音だらけで

  • My head was too full of noise,

    オレンジの木やら 終らない法律の覚書やら

  • too full of orange trees and law memos I could not write

    自分がやった大量殺人でいっぱいでした

  • and mass murders I knew I would be responsible for.

    ベッドの上に座って 体を揺すりながら

  • Sitting on my bed, I rocked back and forth,

    恐怖と孤独にうめいていました」

  • moaning in fear and isolation."

    このせいで 私は初めて米国で入院しました

  • This episode led to my first hospitalization in America.

    既に英国で2度入院しています

  • I had two earlier in England.

    著作の引用を続けます

  • Continuing with the writings:

    「次の朝 教授の部屋に行って

  • "The next morning I went to my professor's office to ask

    覚書の宿題期限の延長をお願いしました

  • for an extension on the memo assignment,

    そして前夜のように訳もわからず まくしたてました

  • and I began gibbering unintelligably

    そして前夜のように訳もわからず まくしたてました

  • as I had the night before,

    とうとう 私は緊急治療室に連れて行かれました

  • and he eventually brought me to the emergency room.

    そこで 私が『先生』と呼ぶ人とその取り巻きどもが

  • Once there, someone I'll just call 'The Doctor'

    私に襲いかかり

  • and his whole team of goons swooped down,

    空中に高々と持ち上げ

  • lifted me high into the air,

    金属ベッドに叩きつけました

  • and slammed me down on a metal bed

    目から星が飛ぶ程の暴力でした

  • with such force that I saw stars.

    そして太い革の紐で 手足を 金属ベッドに縛り付けました

  • Then they strapped my legs and arms to the metal bed

    そして太い革の紐で 手足を 金属ベッドに縛り付けました

  • with thick leather straps.

    聞いたこともない声が 自分の口から出ました

  • A sound came out of my mouth that I'd never heard before:

    うめきと叫びが混ざりあい

  • half groan, half scream,

    人間とは思えぬ恐怖の声でした

  • barely human and pure terror.

    そして 再び生の声が

  • Then the sound came again,

    腹の奥底から喉を這って出てきました」