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  • >> EMILY EVANS: Hello everyone! I’m Emily Evans with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory,

  • and welcome to today’s webinar, which is hosted by the Clean Energy Solutions Center

  • in partnership with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Today’s webinar is

  • focused on the Large-scale Energy Efficiency in Indian BuildingsThe Impact and Role

  • of the Energy Conservation Building Code.

  • One important note of mention before we begin our presentations is that the Clean Energy

  • Solutions Center does not endorse or recommend specific products or services. Information

  • provided in this webinar is featured in the Solutions Center’s resource library as one

  • of many best practices resources reviewed and selected by technical experts.

  • Before we begin, I’ll quickly go over some of the webinar features. For audio, you have

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  • please mute your audio device while you are not presenting. If anyone is having technical

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  • If you would like to ask a question, we ask that you use the "Questions" pane where you

  • may type in your question. If you are having difficulty viewing the materials through the

  • webinar portal, you will find PDF copies of the presentations at cleanenergysolutions.org/training

  • and you may follow along as our speakers present. Also, an audio recording and the presentations

  • will be posted to the Solutions Center training page within a few of weeks and will be added

  • to the Solutions Center YouTube channel where you will find other informative webinars,

  • as well as video interviews with thought leaders on clean energy policy topics.

  • Today’s webinar agenda is centered around the presentations from our guest panelists

  • Elena Berger, Meredydd Evans and Sha Yu, Jyotirmay Mathur and Bhaskar Deol. These panelists have

  • been kind enough to join us to review the progress with ECBC implementation in India

  • and analyze the economic impacts of ECBC-compliant buildings.

  • Before our speakers begin their presentations I will provide a short informative overview

  • of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Initiative. Then, following the presentations, we will

  • have a Question and Answer session where the panelists will address questions submitted

  • by the audience, then closing remarks and a brief evaluation.

  • This slide provides us with a bit of background in terms of how the Solutions Center came

  • to be. The Solutions Center is one of 13 initiatives of the Clean Energy Ministerial that was launched

  • in April of 2011 and is primarily led by Australia, the United States, and other CEM partners.

  • Outcomes of this unique initiative include support of developing countries and emerging

  • economies through enhancement of resources on policies relating to energy access, no-cost

  • expert policy assistance, peer to peer learning and training tools, such as the webinar you

  • are attending today.

  • The Solutions Center has four primary goals: It serves as a clearinghouse of clean energy

  • policy resources. It also serves to share policy best practices, data, and analysis

  • tools specific to clean energy policies and programs. The Solutions Center delivers dynamic

  • services that enable expert assistance, learning, and peer to peer sharing of experiences. And

  • lastly, the Center fosters dialogue on emerging policy issues and innovation around the globe.

  • Our primary audience is energy policy makers and analysts from governments and technical

  • organizations in all countries, but we also strive to engage with the private sector,

  • NGOs, and civil society.

  • A marquee feature that the Solutions Center provides is the no-cost expert policy assistance

  • known as "Ask-an-Expert." The Ask an Expert program has established a broad team of over

  • 30 experts from around the globe who are available to provide remote policy advice and analysis

  • to all countries at no cost. For example, in the area of Buildings we are very pleased

  • to have Cesar Treviño, Leader Mexico Green Building Council serving as one of our experts.

  • If you have a need for policy assistance in Buildings or any other clean energy sector,

  • we encourage you to use this valuable service. Again, this assistance is provided free of

  • charge. To find out if the Ask-an-Expert service can benefit your work please contact Sean

  • Esterly directly at sean.esterly@nrel.gov or at 303.384.7436. We also invite you to

  • spread the word about this service to those in your networks and organizations.

  • In summary, we encourage you to explore and take advantage of the Solutions Center resources

  • and services including the expert policy assistance, the database of clean energy policy resources,

  • subscribe to our newsletter, and participate in webinars like this one.

  • Now, I’d like to provide brief introductions for today’s panelists.

  • First up today is Dr. Elena Berger. Dr. Elena Berger is a Science and Technology Fellow

  • at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, International

  • Program, currently managing the portfolio of projects in renewable and energy efficiency

  • in collaboration with India. Following Dr. Berger we will hear from Meredydd

  • Evans. Meredydd is an energy policy and finance expert with over 20 years of international

  • experience and has worked on energy efficiency and clean energy policies and projects in

  • numerous countries.

  • Presenting with Meredydd will be Sha Yu. Sha is a scientist at the Pacific Northwest National

  • Laboratory.

  • After Meredydd and Sha we will hear from Jyotirmay Mathur. Jyotirmay is a mechanical engineer,

  • with postgraduate degrees in energy from the Indian Institute of Technology, in New Delhi

  • (India) and the University of Essen (Germany)

  • Our final presenter today will be Bhaskar Deol. Bhaskar is an India representative with

  • NRDC’s India Team and is based in New Delhi.

  • And with those introductions I’d like to welcome Dr. Berger to the webinar. Dr. Berger?

  • >> ELENA BERGER: Thank you Emily for that introduction. So I'm waiting to see the presentation.

  • >> EMILY EVANS: And we're getting the slide up. Just give us one moment.

  • >> ELENA BERGER: Thank you very much and thank you for joining this webinar given by the

  • US Department of Energy and organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

  • with the participation of the Malaviya Institute of Technology (MNIT) and the Natural Resources

  • Defense Council (NRDC). I thank you, our partners, at MNIT and NRDC for cooperating with us in

  • organizing this webinar. Next slide please.

  • I would also like to acknowledge our great partners who helped us disseminate information

  • about this webinar. Next slide please.

  • This webinar in our continuing work to support the adoption of building codes in India takes

  • place within the framework of our bilateral partnership between India and the United States

  • and in the recent meeting between Prime Minister Modi and President Obama the two leaders emphasized

  • the commitment of the two countries in advancing the partnership in energy and climate change.

  • Next slide please

  • The Partnership to Advance Clean Energy or PACE has three main components: PACE-D for

  • deployment, PACE-R for research and development, and PEACE for energy access. Building codes

  • belong to the deployment arm of PACE along with other energy efficiency activities, renewable

  • energy, clean fossil, and clean energy finance efforts. Next slide please

  • The Partnership to Advance Clean Energy or PACE takes place under the umbrella of the

  • Indo-US Energy Dialogue and its six working groups. The cooperation on renewable energy

  • and energy efficiency technology are managed under two working groups - Power & Energy

  • Efficiency and New Technology & Renewable Energy working groups. Next slide please

  • The Indo-US Collaboration for the adoption of ECBC is managed under the Power and Energy

  • Efficiency working group. Under this collaboration DOE and PNNL have been engaged with the government

  • of Rajasthan and MNIT since 2011 in two main efforts - Training and Institutional Support

  • and Incentives. We believe that these efforts are very important to advance the main barriers

  • that have presented the adoption of building codes in India.

  • On training, PNNL and MNIT have developed and delivered training workshops and stakeholder

  • meetings in Rajasthan and have developed set of training materials on ECBC 101. On institutional

  • support, PNNL and MNIT have developed an ECBC roadmap in collaboration with the government

  • of Rajasthan, and we have created an award to accelerate the adoption of the code by

  • stakeholders in the state. You will learn more from my colleagues from PNNL that do

  • provide in great detail and talk about these activities in Rajasthan.

  • More recently PNNL has collaborated with MNIT on two ECBC compliant pilot buildings at the

  • MNIT campus and details about this pilot will be presented by Dr. Jyotirmay Mathur from

  • MNIT during this webinar. Mr. Deol Bhaskar from NRDC will also provide case studies from

  • successes in the state of Andhra Pradesh and I thank you NRDC for being a great partner

  • all along in collaborating with us to disseminate the benefits of ECBC doing this webinar. I

  • hope you really enjoy the information that we are trying to convey during this session

  • and will be happy to answer questions at the end of this webinar. Thank you for your attention.

  • >> EMILY EVANS: Thank you Elena. I will now hand it off to Meredydd Evans and Sha Yu who

  • will talk to us about the ECBC implementation, progress, lessons learned and options. Meredydd

  • and Sha?

  • >> MEREDYDD EVANS: Hi, thank you. While the slides are loading...great, I see them right

  • there. I'd like to first say thank you for joining us and I'm looking forward to sharing

  • a few thoughts with you. Next slide please

  • So, on ECBC implementation today I'll describe a couple of themes. First off is an introduction

  • - why ECBC is important and what it is. I'll also talk about progress with implementation

  • and some lessons learned in Rajasthan. Sha Yu will then describe tools for implementation

  • and some takeaway points. Next slide

  • This slide you can see two figures that highlight the core reason for focusing on new buildings

  • in India. They show projections that our institute has done using integrative assessment modeling.

  • They present data on the likely growth in floor space in billion square meters, both

  • in commercial and residential space, from now through 2095 as well as the linked increase

  • in energy demand those buildings in a scenario where there are no specific building policies,

  • like building energy codes. You can see there is a likely tremendous growth in the amount

  • of floor space so by 2050 we are talking something like 35 billion square meters of new buildings.

  • Energy use in those buildings would increase substantially as well. That could put tremendous

  • pressure on India's power system as well as its overall energy systems and instead there

  • is an alternative to save energy and to reduce the energy impact of those buildings while

  • still maintaining comfort. Next slide please

  • So here you can see some analysis the business case for the ECBC. We show calculated savings

  • for ECBC compliant buildings versus typical buildings in different cities in India. The

  • savings are really impressive - 25-40% of the energy can be saved, depending on exactly

  • where the building is and whether it is a building that is used 24 hours a day or is

  • used during day time. Regardless, very impressive figures and what's more those savings are

  • cost effective. Next slide Which means that the savings themselves, the

  • reduction in energy consumption, can pay for itself, can pay for the investments themselves.

  • In addition, ECBC implementation can reduce CO2 emissions and it can accelerate deployment

  • of energy-efficient technologies. Next slide

  • So, what is ECBC? Just a quick overview. It was issued in 2007 by the Ministry of Power

  • and the Bureau of Energy Efficiency. It's mandatory in the states that have adopted

  • it for all new commercial buildings with connected load over 100kW, basically for all large new

  • commercial buildings. It's different from voluntary labels like LEED because it is mandatory

  • and it applies to all buildings in those jurisdictions. ECBC addresses building envelope - so the

  • walls, windows, etc., HVAC, lighting, electrical systems, hot water, and pumping. And it allows

  • for three different compliance approaches: A prescriptive approach with specific levels

  • of say insulation or specific types of windows allowed, a trade-off option with slightly

  • more flexibility, and a whole building performance approach that requires the use of sophisticated

  • building simulation software. So just to recap a couple of the differences between ECBC and

  • green building labels such as LEED or GRIHA, ECBC is mandatory and it covers presumably

  • all buildings in the jurisdictions that adopt it. ECBC covers only the energy provisions,

  • so not other energy issues, other non-energy issues like water. ECBC is not score based

  • but rather it's based on engineering principles. Next slide