Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hey, it’s Marie Forleo and you are watching MarieTV, the place to be to create a business

    ねぇ、マリーフォーレオーだよ、ビジネスを作るための場所、MarieTVを見ているあなたへ

  • and life you love. And today I have a question for you. Do you ever wish that you were more

    とあなたが愛する人生。そして今日はあなたに質問がありますあなたは今までにもっと

  • persuasive? Whether you wanna win over a customer service rep or maybe a new client or event

    説得力がありますか?顧客サービス担当者や新規顧客やイベントを獲得したいのかどうか?

  • a significant other, being able to influence another person, of course in an honest, ethical

    人を動かすことができる

  • way, is a key to success and my guest today is gonna show us how.

    今日のゲストは、その方法を教えてくれます。

  • Bob Burg is a best selling author and speaker on topics vital to the success of today’s

    ボブ・バーグはベストセラー作家であり、今日の成功に欠かせないトピックについて講演しています。

  • businessperson. Burg is a co-author ofThe Go-Giver,” “Go-Givers Sell More,” “It’s

    ビジネスパーソンでもある。Burg氏は、『The Go-Giver』、『Go-Givers Sell More』、『It's It』の共著者です。

  • Not About You,” andEndless Referrals.” Together his books have sold more than a million

    あなたのことではなく」「終わりのない紹介」。彼の本は100万冊以上売れています

  • copies. Bob believes his new book, “Adversaries into Allies: Win People Over Without Manipulation

    をコピーしています。ボブは、彼の新刊『同盟国への敵対者』を信じています。操らずに人に勝つ

  • or Coercion,” is by far his most important work yet.

    または強制」は、彼の最も重要な作品である。

  • Bob, thank you so much for being here on MarieTV. This is awesome.

    ボブ、MarieTVに来てくれてありがとう。これはすごいですね。

  • Marie, I am honored. Thanks for having me.

    マリー 光栄だよお招きいただきありがとうございます。

  • So I have to say, you wrote one of my favorite books ever, “The Go-Giver.” And I just

    あなたが書いた本の中で 一番好きな本の一つが "ゴギバー "だわ私はただ

  • really wanted to thank you for that because it made a huge difference in my personal life

    それは私の個人的な生活の中で大きな違いを作ったので、それを本当に感謝したいと思いました。

  • and it so resonates with everything that I try and do for myself and everything that

    自分のために、そして自分のためにしようとするすべてのことに共鳴します。

  • we try and teach on MarieTV, which is to focus on giving rather than getting. So that was

    私たちはMarieTVで教えようとしていることは、「得ることよりも与えることに焦点を当てる」ということです。それは

  • just a little public acknowledgement and if you don't have this book, “The Go-Giver,”

    少しだけ世間に認められて、もしこの本を持っていないならば、"The Go-Giver "という本を

  • you have to get yourself it now. But today were gonna focus on your other amazing

    今すぐにでも手に入れなければなりませんでも、今日は、あなたの他の驚くべきことに 焦点を当てます

  • book, and I know you have more than 2, but today were going to focus onAdversaries

    の本、2冊以上お持ちの方もいらっしゃると思いますが、今日は「敵対者

  • into Allies.” This is awesome. “How to Win People Over Without Manipulation or Coercion.”

    "同盟国へ"これはすごいな"人を操らず、強要せずに人を騙す方法"

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • Now, one of the things that struck me was that you make a real distinction between persuasion

    さて、私が印象的だったのは、あなたが説得を区別していることです。

  • and manipulation. Can you tell us what that is?

    と操作しています。それが何なのか教えてくれませんか?

  • Yeah. And, you know, I made that point early because it’s a question that’s very natural.

    そうなんですよ。で、その、早い段階でその点を指摘したのは、ごく自然な質問だからです。

  • When you think of influence, which is really in a sense what the book is about, influence

    影響力について考えるとき、それはある意味ではこの本の主題でもあるのですが、影響力というのは

  • can be defined as simply the ability to move a person or persons to a desired action usually

    は、単に人や人を通常の所望の行動に移す能力として定義することができます。

  • within the context of a specific goal. You can do that one of two ways. You could do

    を特定の目標の文脈の中で使うことができます。2つの方法のうちの1つを取ることができますあなたができるのは

  • it through manipulating another person or you can do it through persuading another person.

    他の人を操ってやるか、他の人を説得してやるか。

  • And really manipulation and persuasion are cousins. Now, one’s the evil cousin. Manipulation’s

    操りと説得は従兄弟だ片方は悪のいとこだ操りは

  • the evil cousin.

    邪悪ないとこ

  • The dark cousin.

    闇の従兄弟。

  • Right. The dark cousin. And persuasion’s the good one. But, let’s face it, both the

    そうだな暗いいとこ説得は良い方だしかし、それに直面してみましょう、両方の

  • manipulator and the persuader, they both understand human interaction. They both understand human

    操る側と説得する側、どちらも人間関係を理解しています。二人とも人間関係を理解しています

  • motivation. They understand what makes people tick and what makes people move to action.

    モチベーションを高めます。何が人を動かすのか、何が人を行動に移すのかを理解しています。

  • Sobut there’s still a big difference and that’s the key. And obviously we don't

    だから...でも、まだ大きな違いがあるし、それが重要なんだ。そして、明らかに我々は

  • encourage people to manipulate, but rather to persuade. One of the best examples or explanations

    人を操るように促すのではなく、人を説得するように促す。最良の例や説明の一つ

  • of the two, the difference in the two, is from a gentleman by the name of Dr. Paul W.

    の違いは、ポール・W博士という名前の紳士からです。

  • Swets. He wrote a book back in 1986 entitled, “The Art of Talking So that People Will

    スウェッツ彼は1986年に「人を惹きつける話術」という本を書いています。

  • Listen,” though it was much more about listening than it was about talking. And I thought his

    話すことよりも聞くことの方がはるかに多かったのですが、「聞く」。そして、私は彼の

  • explanation was great. According to Dr. Swets, manipulation aims at control, not cooperation.

    説明が素晴らしかった。スウェッツ博士によると、マニピュレーションの目的は制御であって、協力ではないとのことです。

  • It does not consider the good of the other party, it results in a win-lose situation.

    相手の良さを考えず、結果的に勝ち負けになる。

  • In direct contrast to the manipulator, the persuader always seeks to enhance the self

    マニピュレーターとは対照的に、説得者は常に自己を高めようとする。

  • esteem of the other party. The result is that people respond better because theyre treated

    相手の尊敬を集めることができます。その結果、人々はより良い反応をするようになります。

  • as responsible or response-able, self directing individuals. So it begins with intent but

    責任ある、あるいは対応可能な、自己を指示する個人として。だからそれは意図から始まりますが

  • that’s not where it ends. See, both the manipulator and the persuader can elicit immediate

    それだけでは終わらない操る側も説得する側もすぐに

  • action, but that’s where it ends because once you know youve been manipulated, Marie,

    操られていると分かった時点で終わりだからな

  • you will avoid that person. Youll do the best you can to resist that person. Even if

    あなたはその人を避けます。あなたはその人に全力で抵抗しますたとえ

  • you have to work with that person, youll do something to not have to be involved in

    その人と一緒に仕事をしなければならない場合は、関わらなくてもいいようなことをします。

  • some way. With a persuader though, that’s different. See, a persuadersee, a manipulator

    何らかの形で。説得力のある人間とは違うほら、説得者は...ほら、操り屋だ。

  • is win at all costs. They may not want to hurt the other person, but if they have to

    は何としてでも勝つことです。相手を傷つけたくないのかもしれませんが、もしそうしなければならない場合は

  • in order to get their way they will. Theyre very I focused or me focused. Not the case

    彼らは自分たちのやり方で行動するために彼らは非常に私に集中していたり 私に集中していたりしますそうではありません。

  • with the persuader. For them to win the other person also has to win. So when youve been

    説得者と相手が勝つためには 相手も勝つ必要がありますということは、あなたが

  • persuaded you feel good about that person and youre more likely to buy into their

    惚れ込まれる

  • ideas again.

    またアイデアを。

  • Yeah and I love that distinction also that it taps into feelings. It’s like how do

    その区別が好きなんだ 感情に訴えかけてくるんだどうやって

  • you feel when youre persuaded? Is it a win-win for both of you?

    説得された時の気持ちは?お互いに得をしているのでしょうか?

  • Exactly.

    その通り

  • And I thought that wasit’s really important because, you know, one of the things that

    それは本当に重要なことだと思ったんです。

  • weve discovered and what we do here on MarieTV and in our program B-School, so many

    私たちが発見したこと、そして私たちがここMarieTVで、そして私たちの番組「B-School」で行っていることは、とてもたくさんあります。

  • people associate sales and marketing or getting your product or your idea out into the world

    人々は、販売とマーケティングを関連付けたり、製品やアイデアを世に送り出したりしています。

  • with somehow being pushy or somehow being manipulative.

    何となく押し付けがましいというか、何となく操られているというか。

  • Just the opposite.

    まさにその逆。

  • Exactly. And it’s just the opposite. And that’s why I was so excited to talk with

    その通りだそして、それは正反対です。それが興奮していた理由です

  • you today because I think this reframing of how to add value in other people’s lives

    今日のあなたはどうやって他人の人生に付加価値をつけるかというリフレーミングを考えています

  • and whenever if we bump up against conflict, which were gonna talk about in a few minutes,

    紛争にぶつかった時にはいつでも、それは数分後に話します。

  • how do you deal with that in a way that’s empathetic and compassionate and that leaves

    どうやってそれに対処するのか、共感と思いやりを持って

  • both people not only feeling great but it’s actually a true win win for both of them.

    二人とも気分が良いだけでなく、実際には二人にとって真の勝利です。

  • It is. And, Marie, so many people when they go into business and they do something they

    それはそうです。マリー、多くの人がビジネスを始めた時に、何かをする時に

  • love, they have a product or service they feel so good about and they know they can

    愛情を持って、彼らは彼らが良いと感じる製品やサービスを持っていて、彼らは彼らができることを知っています。

  • add value to people’s lives. But they say, “Oh, but I don't wanna sell.” Why? Because

    人々の生活に付加価値を与えるしかし、彼らは言う "ああ、でも私は売りたくない"なぜですか?それは

  • it’s how theyre defining selling. See, if you look at selling as something you do

    それが販売の定義なんだ売るということを、何かをするということと考えれば

  • to someone, if you define selling as trying to convince somebody to buy something they

    を買うように説得することを売りと定義するならば、誰かに

  • don't want or need, who wants to do that? We couldn’t feel good about something like

    don'39;t want or need, who wants to do that?のようなものについて、私たちは良い気分になれませんでした。

  • that. Really all selling is at its veryat its basic is simply finding out what somebody

    そのことだ本当にすべての販売は、その...その基本的なことは、単に誰かが何をするかを見つけることです。

  • does want or need and helping them to get it.

    欲しいものや必要としているものがあり、それを手に入れる手助けをしています。

  • Yeah.

    そうだな

  • That’s what it is. And when you look at it that way you can feel great about it because

    それはそれでいいんです。そうやって見ていると、それを素晴らしいと感じることができるからです。

  • you know youre providing a service to that person.

    その人にサービスを提供していることを知っていると

  • Absolutely. So let’s shift into the five principles that are really the core of the

    その通りです。では、本当に核となる5つの原則にシフトしていきましょう。

  • book. So let’s start off with principle number one, which is all about being able

    の本を読んでみてください。では、まず第一の原則から始めましょう。

  • to be the master of our own emotions.

    自分の感情の主になるために

  • Exactly.

    その通り

  • Yeah.

    そうだな

  • It’s control your own emotions. The sages of long ago asked who was a mighty person

    それは、自分の感情をコントロールすることです。昔の賢者たちは、誰が強大な人間なのかと問うた。

  • and they answered, “That person who can control their own emotions and make of an

    と答えると、「自分の感情をコントロールして、自分の感情を

  • enemy or a potential enemy a friend.” It all begins with that because, see, until you

    "敵か潜在的な敵か......友か"すべてはそこから始まっている なぜなら、ほら、あなたが

  • canit’s only when you can control your own emotions that youre able to take a

    自分の感情をコントロールできて初めて

  • potentially negative situation or person and turn it into a win for everyone involved.

    潜在的にネガティブな状況や人を、関係者全員の勝利に変えることができます。

  • But why is that so difficult? Well, because were human beings.

    でも、どうしてそんなに難しいの?それは、人間だからです。

  • Yeah.

    そうだな

  • And as human beings were emotional creatures. I would like to think were logical, and

    そして、人間としては感情的な生き物です。私たちは論理的だと思いたいし

  • to a certain extent we are, but really we are emotion driven. We make major decisions

    ある程度はそうですが、本当は感情で動いています。私たちは大きな決断をします

  • based on emotion and we back up those emotional decisions with logic. We rationalize. And

    感情に基づいて、感情的な決定を 論理的にバックアップします私たちは合理化しますそして

  • if you take that word it means we tell ourselves rational lies and we do that in order to justify

    その言葉を借りるならば、私たちは自分自身に合理的な嘘をついて、自分を正当化するためにそうしているということです。

  • that emotional decision. Well, there’s alsoemotion also comes into play when you just

    感情的な決断だまあ、それと...感情もまた、あなたの場合は、

  • feel lousy about something. Now, we know nobody can make us feel bad or angry or sad or mad,

    お粗末な気分になる今、私たちは誰も私たちを嫌な気分にさせたり、怒ったり、悲しい気持ちにさせたり、怒ったりすることはできないことを知っています。

  • but what they can do is they can either intentionally or usually unintentionally do things that

    しかし、彼らにできることは、意図的に、あるいは通常は意図せずに、次のようなことをすることができるということです。

  • push our buttons and cause ourselves to become mad or angry or sad or what have you. And

    私たちのボタンを押して、自分自身が怒ったり怒ったり悲しんだり、何を持っているかになる原因になります。そして

  • when we allow ourself to be controlled by that we can’t be part of the solution by

    それに支配されることを許すと、解決の一翼を担うことができなくなります。

  • the very nature of the thing. We become part of the problem and things don't work out.

    その本質に迫るものがあります。私たちは問題の一部になってしまい、物事がうまくいかなくなってしまうのです。

  • This is not to say that we should forego our emotions. Emotions are a great part of life.

    これは、感情を捨てろと言っているのではありません。感情は人生の大部分を占めています。

  • They make life joyous and worthwhile. But as one of my great mentors, Dandi Schumachi,

    彼らは人生を楽しくやりがいのあるものにしてくれます。しかし 私の偉大な師匠の一人である ダンディ・シューマチのように

  • says, “By all means, take your emotions along for the ride but make sure you are driving

    は、「ぜひとも、自分の感情を乗せて運転してみてください」と言っています。

  • the car.”

    "車の中で"

  • I loved that when I read it in the book. It was so great. And I think it’s so important

    本で読んだ時は大好きでした。凄く素晴らしかったです。そして、とても大切なことだと思うのですが

  • to remember because in those situations where our buttons do get pressed it’s very easy,

    ボタンが押されてしまうような状況では、それは非常に簡単なので、覚えておくことをお勧めします。

  • especially in this world where we can text in a moment, we can reply on social media,

    特に今の世の中、一瞬でメールができるので、ソーシャルメディア上で返信することができます。

  • you can reply in email, and those things can’t be taken back. I mean, words can’t be taken

    メールで返信しても、そういうものは取り返しがつきません。つまり、言葉は取り返しがつかないのです

  • back. But I think it’s vital for this idea of turning adversaries or any kind of conflict,

    戻す。でも、敵対者を回すとか、どんな争いでも、この考え方には欠かせないと思うんです。

  • someone that we have conflict with, into an ally, of being able to chill out for a minute

    矛先を冷やす味方

  • and not be driven by your emotions. So one ofan action strategy would be to just

    感情に流されないようにだから、一つは...行動戦略は、ただ...

  • Well, if you know that youre susceptible to this then what you wanna do is rehearse.

    自分が影響を受けやすいと知っているならば......やりたいことはリハーサルだ。

  • You know, imagine situations that you know that have happened in the past that could

    あなたが知っている状況を想像してみてください過去に起こったことを

  • happen again where your buttons could be pressed and see both results. I mean, see what it

    あなたのボタンが押されて両方の結果を見ることができるところで再び起こりますつまり、それが何であるかを参照してください

  • would be like if you did what you usually do and that that’s probably not the result

    のようなものだろう。

  • you want and then imagine yourself just, as Zig Ziglar used to say, responding instead

    そして、ジグ・ジグラーがよく言っていたように、自分自身を想像してみてください。

  • of reacting. Really being in control of yourself, being calm, listening to that person first,

    反応すること。本当に自分をコントロールすること、冷静であること、まずその人の話を聞くことです。

  • taking a moment to decide what to do and seeing it turn out beautifully. And it’s sort of

    何をするかを決める時間があって それがきれいに仕上がるのを見るとそして、それは一種の

  • like a, and I use this analogy in the book, like an astronaut who’s going up into space.

    本の中でこの例えを使っています 宇宙に行く宇宙飛行士のようにね

  • Before they do he or she is going to do a lot of simulations, maybe hundreds of them,

    その前に彼や彼女は何百回も何百回もシミュレーションをすることになります。

  • so by the time they get up into space and something happens theyve already been there

    宇宙に行って何かが起きた時にはもうそこにいたんだな

  • and done that. And while it’s a little bit different certainly than actually doing it,

    と、それをやってみました。実際にやってみるのとは少し違いますが

  • it’s not that much different. We know the mind can’t tell thethe subconscious

    それはそれほど違いはありません。心がわからないことはわかっています...潜在意識は

  • can’t tell the difference between what’s actually happened and what’s been suggested

    一目で見ても二目でもない

  • to it. So if you see yourself doing it, if youre rehearsing this, if youre picturing

    それに合わせて自分がやっているのを見て リハーサルをしているのを見て 絵を描いているのを見て

  • those wonderful results in your mind’s eye, then when the situation comes up youre

    その素晴らしい結果を心の目で見て、いざという時には

  • much more likely to do it. And when you do and you handle it beautifully, take pleasure

    それをする可能性が高くなります。そして、あなたがするとき、あなたはそれを美しく処理するとき、喜びを取る

  • in that. Congratulate yourself. Know that if youve done it once you can do it every

    その中で自分自身を祝福してください。一度やったことがあれば、すべてのことができることを知っています。

  • time. But there’s one more thing though, and that’s to understand you probably won’t

    時間だしかし、そこにはもう一つのことがありますが、それは理解することです。

  • do it right every time. At least I know I don't.

    毎回ちゃんとやるんだ少なくとも私はしていないことを知っている

  • Oh, I don't either.

    ああ、私もそうだ。

  • Yet in those times when we don't because were human and it’s gonna happen, we can feel

    しかし、私たちは人間であり、それが起こりそうだからといって、そうではない時には、私たちは感じることができます。

  • a little bad about it, but not too bad. Don't go intodon't go into a guilt trip about

    少し悪いことをしたが、それほど悪くはない。Don't go into... don't go into a guilt trip about

  • it. Understand that youre human and youll have many chances to practice.

    ということを理解しておくことが大切です。人間であることを理解して、練習する機会を多く持つようにしましょう。

  • Yeah. I love that. I love the rehearsing bit. I know one thing that always works for me,

    ああ、いいねリハーサルが好きなんだ私にはいつもうまくいくことがあるの

  • weve talked a lot about it on the show, is like taking a time out. Like, if you feel

    番組でも何度も話したんだけど 休みを取るみたいな感じであなたが感じているなら

  • yourself emotionally charged by something that’s come in and you don't have to respond

    感情的に充電された何かが入ってきて、あなたが応答する必要はありません。

  • right away

    すぐに...

  • Right.

    そうだな

  • ...to give yourself a little bit of a cooling off period so you can clear out and then,

    ...自分の体を少し冷やす期間を設けて、スッキリさせることができます。

  • you know, think

    あのね、考えてみて

  • Very important.

    とても重要なことです。

  • Yeah. A little more empathetically. So let’s move on. What’s principle number two?

    そうだなもう少し共感できるようにでは、次に進みましょう。原則その2とは?

  • That is to understand the clash of belief systems, and this is so very key. What is

    それは信念体系の衝突を理解することであり、これはとても重要なことなのです。これは何かというと

  • a belief? Well, a belief really is a subjective truth. It’s the truth as we understand the

    信念?信念とは本当に主観的な真実ですそれは、私たちが理解しているように

  • truth to be, which doesn't mean it’s the truth. That means it’s our truth.

    真実であることが真実であることを意味するのではなくそれは私たちの真実を意味します

  • Our truth.

    私たちの真実。

  • Right. Now, our truth might be the truth, but it’s not necessarily and it’s probably

    そうだなさて、私たちの真実は真実かもしれませんが、それは必ずしも真実ではありませんし、おそらく

  • so far less than what we think.

    私たちが考えているよりもはるかに少ない

  • Right.

    そうだな

  • Well, you know, we have our truths, our truths are a result of our belief systems. I call

    私たちには真実があります 私たちの真実は 信念体系の結果です私は

  • it an operating system. And it’s an unconscious operating system. Were not even aware of

    それはオペレーティングシステムですそしてそれは無意識のオペレーティングシステムです私たちは意識していません

  • it. Our beliefs are a combination of upbringing, environments, schooling, news media, television

    であることを示しています。私たちの信念は 育った環境、環境、学校教育、ニュースメディア、テレビの組み合わせです

  • shows, movies, popular culture, cultural mores, everyall the associations we have. And

    ショー、映画、大衆文化、文化的モラル...すべての...私たちが持っているすべての関連性。そして

  • it’s pretty muchthe interesting thing about it, it’s pretty much set in place

    それはかなり...面白いところでは、かなりの設定になっています。

  • by the time were little more than toddlers. And at that point everything new that comes

    私たちが幼児以下になる頃にはその時点ですべての新しいものが

  • into that belief system tends to build on that foundation or that premise. So people

    その信念体系の中には、その基礎や前提に基づいて構築されている傾向があります。だから人々は

  • grow up with a particular belief system not even realizing it. Thinking, saying, doing

    特定の信念体系を持って育っていることに気づかない。考えること、言うこと、すること

  • things based on those beliefs and they live their entire life doing that. Well, we have

    その信念に基づいて物事を進めていくのですが、彼らはそのような生活を送っています。さて、私たちは

  • to also understand that this other person with whom were about to have a potentially

    私たちがこれから一緒に行動する相手は、

  • difficult personalinterpersonal transaction, theyre a victim of their, and when I say

    難しい個人的な...対人関係の取引で、彼らは被害者です。

  • victim I don't mean victim mentality, I mean

    被害者......被害者精神ではなく、つまり....

  • No, of course.

    いや、もちろんです。

  • ...it’s… it’s just unconscious and it’s just how most of us are. That they also live

    ...それは...無意識のうちに、私たちのほとんどがそうなのです。彼らもまた

  • according to their belief systems and theyre unconscious about it and that’s where a

    彼らは自分の信念体系に従って、それを無意識に意識しています。

  • clash can really occur. And as human beings we tend to think that everybody else sees

    衝突が本当に起こる可能性があります。そして人間である私たちは、誰もが見ていると思いがちです。

  • the world as we see the world. How could it be anything else? That’s how we see the

    私たちが見ている世界と同じように他に何かあるでしょうか?それは、私たちが見ているように

  • world, which is why you hear people say things like, “Oh, everybody feels that way.”

    だからこそ、「ああ、みんなそう思っているんだ」というような言葉を耳にするのです。

  • Or, “Oh, nobody likes that.” Or if youve ever said, I know I have certainly, “Oh,

    "誰も好きじゃない "とかあなたが言ったことがあるなら 私は確かに知っています "ああ

  • I would never say that to someone.” Right?

    "人には絶対言わない"(山里)そうですよね?

  • Of course.

    もちろんです。

  • Because that’s our belief. No we wouldn’t, but they would. They come from a different

    それが私たちの信念だからいいえ、私たちはそうしませんが、彼らはそうします。彼らは別の

  • belief system. So what we need to do, Marie, is not necessarily understand that person’s

    信念体系ですだから、マリー、私たちがすべきことは、必ずしもその人の信念を理解することではない。

  • belief system. They probably don't understand their own belief system. What we need to do

    信念体系を理解していないのでしょう。彼らはおそらく自分の信念体系を 理解していないのでしょう私たちがすべきことは

  • is simply understand that the two of us, that we see the world from two different models

    は、単に我々は2つの異なるモデルから世界を参照してください、私たちの2つのことを理解しています。

  • or paradigms or viewpoints, belief systems. And as long as we understand that and we respect

    パラダイムや視点、信念体系を理解している限りそれを理解し、尊重している限り

  • that, now we can create the context for a mutual win win.

    それが、今では、相互に勝利を勝ち取るための文脈を作ることができるようになりました。

  • That’s awesome and it’s just really that awareness that can, I know for me

    それは素晴らしいことで、それは本当にその意識が私のために、私は知っています...

  • Absolutely.

    その通りだ

  • ...disable that immediate maybe reaction or fight that wants to come up and like, “What

    ...その即時のかもしれない反応や戦いを無効にして、「何を」のように出てくることを望んでいる

  • are they thinking? Why don't they get it?” And I loved that about your book that it just

    彼らは何を考えているのでしょうか?なぜ彼らはそれを理解しないのか?"私はあなたの本が大好きでした

  • starts to set that frame for more empathetic, compassionate, kind interaction.

    は、より共感的で、思いやりのある、親切な相互作用のためのフレームを設定し始めます。

  • Yeah. And it allows us to not take things personally and to personalize things. One

    そうだな物事を個人的にとらえることなく、個人的なものにすることができます。一つの

  • of the best books ever written on that topic was by Don Miguel Ruiz, “The Four Agreements.”

    その話題で書かれた最高の本は ドン・ミゲル・ルイズの "4つの合意 "です

  • Yes.

    そうですね。

  • And when he talked about the agreements of the world, which I call belief systems, he

    そして、私が信念体系と呼んでいる世界の協定の話をすると

  • also showed why we really don't have to take things personally. It isn’t about us. It

    私たちが個人的に物事をとらえる必要がないことも示していますそれは私たちのことではありませんそれは

  • all has to do with that unconscious way that that person sees the world and so forth. And

    すべてはその人の無意識の世界の見方などに関係していますそして

  • so, you know, whenever I find myself taking things personally, I still go to that chapter

    だから、自分が個人的に物事を 捉えていることに気付いた時には いつでもその章を読んでいます

  • in the book.

    本の中で

  • Me too. For sure. Ok, so moving on to principle number three, acknowledging their ego.

    俺もだ確かに第三原則に移ろう自我を認めることだ

  • Yeah. And, you know, I say acknowledge their ego not ours because we don't have one.

    そうですね。そして、あなたが知っている、私は彼らの自我を認めると言う 私たちではなく、私たちは1つを持っていないので。

  • Yeah, right.

    ああ、そうだな。

  • No, we obviously, we have to acknowledge ours too. We have to be aware of it. And what’s

    いや、明らかに、私たちは私たちのことも認めなければならない。私たちはそれを認識しなければなりませんそして、何が

  • interesting is the ego itself, and we tend to especially in the personal development

    興味深いのは自我そのものであり、我々は特に個人的な開発に傾向がある...

  • Community?

    コミュニティ?

  • ...community if you will, we tend to say, “Oh, everything about the ego is bad.”

    ...コミュニティでは、「自我のすべてが悪い」と言いがちです。

  • Not necessarily. The ego just is. The ego is the I. Literally that’s what the ego

    必ずしもそうとは限らない自我はただあるだけです自我とは「私」のことです。 文字通り、自我とは

  • is. It’s that sense of self that realizes we are a distinct human being separate from

    である。それは、私たちが別個の人間であることに気づく自己の感覚です。

  • other human beings. And, you know, that’s a little politically incorrectincorrect

    他の人間のことですそれはちょっと政治的に間違っている...間違っている

  • to say. You know, separate from other…? What? Well, we are.

    と言うこと。他の人とは別の...?何を?まあ、私たちは

  • Yeah.

    そうだな

  • Now, don't getwere part of the whole universal consciousness and we learned that

    私たちは普遍的な意識の一部であり、それを学んだのです。

  • back from Napoleon Hill and certainly quantum physics and the vibrations and theyre in

    ナポレオン・ヒルから戻ってきて確かに量子物理学と振動と

  • tuneof course. Were partbut you know what? In our earthly human existence

    決まってるじゃないですか私たちは一部だが...この地球上の人間の存在では...

  • Yes.

    そうですね。

  • ...we operate as individuals. We seek our own sense of happiness and we have our own

    ...私たちは個人として活動しています。私たちは自分自身の幸福感を求め、自分自身の

  • individual values and so forth. And so we do operate that way. And the ego, when channeled

    個人の価値観などだから私たちはそのように行動しますそして自我は、チャネリングされると

  • and controlled, can help us accomplish great things for ourselves and for the community

    統制されていることは、私たちが自分自身と地域社会のために偉大なことを成し遂げるのに役立ちます。

  • as a whole. But when it gets away from us and were not in control, that’s… now,

    全体としてしかし、それが私たちから離れて、私たちがコントロールできなくなったとき、それは...今です。

  • that’s a different thing. So when I say acknowledge their ego, it’s because we need

    それは別の話だだから私が彼らのエゴを認めると言った時、それは私たちが必要としているからです。

  • to understand that if that person is acting in any way that’s counterproductive, unhelpful,

    その人が何らかの方法で行動している場合、それは逆効果であり、役に立たないことを理解するために。

  • even if it’s not benefitting them, but there’s a… you can tell there’s a real emotional

    たとえそれが彼らの利益にならなくても、しかし、そこには...

  • thing there, there’s a good chance their ego has taken over.

    そこにあるのは、彼らのエゴが支配している可能性が高い。

  • And what do you suggest about acknowledging it? Like, is it just really letting that person

    それを認めることについて、あなたは何を提案していますか?例えば、それは本当にその人に任せておけばいいのか?