Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

AI 自動生成字幕
  • In the future, I think emotional intelligence will be one of several abilities that we need.

    将来、エモーショナル・インテリジェンスは、私たちに必要ないくつかの能力のひとつになると思う。

  • Another, of course, is cognitive ability, IQ, and maybe AI will take over more and more of that.

    もうひとつはもちろん、認知能力、IQであり、おそらくAIがそれをどんどん引き継いでいくだろう。

  • However, emotional intelligence is a human ability and will always remain so.

    しかし、エモーショナル・インテリジェンスは人間の能力であり、これからもそうあり続けるだろう。

  • IQ predicts how well you'll do in your school years and how much salary you can make over the course of a career because it says what job you can get into, like being a business executive or a doctor or a lawyer.

    IQは、学生時代の成績や、キャリアの過程でどれだけの給料を稼ぐことができるかを予測するものである。

  • But once you're in those professions, everybody else is about as smart as you are.

    でも、そういう職業に就いてしまえば、他のみんなはあなたと同じくらい賢い。

  • That's where emotional intelligence kicks in.

    そこでエモーショナル・インテリジェンスの出番となる。

  • People who emerge as outstanding performers or the best leaders have high emotional intelligence and their IQ is not that relevant at that point.

    優れたパフォーマーや最高のリーダーとして頭角を現す人は、高い感情的知性を持っており、その時点ではIQはそれほど関係ない。

  • I'm Daniel Goleman.

    私はダニエル・ゴールマンだ。

  • I've written many books, mostly on emotional intelligence.

    私は多くの本を書いているが、そのほとんどがエモーショナル・インテリジェンスに関するものだ。

  • That's really my favorite topic.

    本当に大好きなトピックなんだ。

  • The book Emotional Intelligence many years ago was an international bestseller.

    何年も前に出版された『エモーショナル・インテリジェンス』は世界的ベストセラーになった。

  • I've written now five books on the topic.

    私はこのテーマで5冊の本を書いた。

  • My most recent is Optimal, how to sustain personal and organizational excellence every day.

    私の最新作は『Optimal』(オプティマル)、個人と組織の卓越性を毎日維持する方法である。

  • Emotional intelligence is a set of personal skills that we learn in life.

    エモーショナル・インテリジェンスは、私たちが人生で学ぶ一連の個人的スキルである。

  • It's a combination of self-awareness, managing your emotions well, empathy, tuning into other people and putting that all together to have harmonious or effective relationships.

    自己認識、感情をうまくコントロールすること、共感すること、他者に同調すること、そして調和した、あるいは効果的な人間関係を築くためにそれらを組み合わせることだ。

  • Emotional intelligence has been talked about for centuries.

    エモーショナル・インテリジェンスについては、何世紀にもわたって語られてきた。

  • Philosophers were talking about know thyself, that's self-awareness.

    哲学者たちは "汝自身を知れ "と言っていた。

  • But when I wrote the Emotional Intelligence book in '95, it was the first time that for a popular audience, emotional intelligence had become well-known.

    しかし、私が95年に『エモーショナル・インテリジェンス』を書いたとき、一般読者にとってエモーショナル・インテリジェンスが初めて知られるようになった。

  • I was a science journalist at the New York Times back then and I'd been covering a decade of research on the brain and emotion.

    当時、私はニューヨーク・タイムズ紙の科学記者で、脳と感情に関する10年にわたる研究を取材していた。

  • And in doing so, I came across a very obscure article called Emotional Intelligence and I loved the title.

    そうしているうちに、『エモーショナル・インテリジェンス』という非常にわかりにくい記事に出くわした。

  • It was by Peter Salovey, who's just stepping down as the president of Yale University and his then graduate student, John Mayer.

    イェール大学の学長を退任したばかりのピーター・サロヴェイと、彼の当時の大学院生だったジョン・メイヤーによるものだ。

  • And I thought, wow, what a great phrase.

    そして、うわあ、なんて素晴らしい言葉なんだろうと思った。

  • It seems like an oxymoron.

    矛盾しているように思える。

  • You don't put emotions together with intelligence, but actually it's being intelligent about emotions.

    感情と知性を一緒にしてはいけない。

  • When I wrote Emotional Intelligence, I was actually thinking of bringing it to schools.

    私が『エモーショナル・インテリジェンス』を書いたとき、実はこれを学校に持ち込もうと考えていた。

  • It seemed to me that kids should learn from the get-go how to manage themselves, how to tune into themselves, how to tune into other people, how to get along, how to behave well and so on.

    子供たちは、自分自身を管理する方法、自分自身に同調する方法、他の人々に同調する方法、うまく付き合う方法、うまく振る舞う方法などを、最初から学ぶべきだと私には思えた。

  • I was a big advocate of what's now called social emotional learning.

    私は、今でいう社会的情緒学習の大きな提唱者だった。

  • And from early on, my view of emotional intelligence hasn't really changed much, but I integrated it with findings from research on outstanding performers.

    そして早い時期から、私のエモーショナル・インテリジェンスに対する考え方はあまり変わっていないが、優れたパフォーマーに関する研究から得られた知見と統合した。

  • And I saw that different abilities of high performers, like being able to manage your emotions, fit well in the model.

    そして、感情をコントロールできるなど、高いパフォーマンスを発揮する人たちのさまざまな能力が、このモデルにうまく適合することがわかった。

  • And now I talk about four domains of emotional intelligence and then 12 particular competencies of people who are high in emotional intelligence.

    そして今、私は感情的知性の4つの領域と、感情的知性の高い人の12の特別な能力について話している。

  • Self-awareness means you know what you're feeling, you know how it shapes your perceptions and your thoughts and your impulse to act.

    自己認識とは、自分が何を感じているかを知ることであり、それが自分の知覚や思考、行動衝動をどのように形作っているかを知ることだ。

  • We find in our research that people low in self-awareness are unable to develop strengths very well in other parts of emotional intelligence.

    私たちの研究では、自己認識が低い人は、感情的知性の他の部分で強みをあまり伸ばすことができないことがわかっています。

  • People who are high in self-awareness, however, are able to develop excellence across the board.

    しかし、自己認識が高い人は、あらゆる面で卓越した能力を身につけることができる。

  • Self-management means when you're upset, when you're angry, when you're anxious, can you manage your emotions?

    自己管理とは、動揺しているとき、怒っているとき、不安なときに、自分の感情をコントロールできるかということだ。

  • Can you keep them from disrupting your focus on what you have to do right now?

    今やるべきことへの集中を妨げないようにできるか?

  • We're having more instances of road rage, of shootings, of people blowing up at other people.

    路上での怒り、発砲事件、他人に発砲する事件が増えている。

  • There's a growing need for people in general to get better at this ability.

    この能力を高める必要性が高まっている。

  • The third part is social awareness, which in one sense means practicing empathy.

    第3の部分は社会的認識であり、ある意味では共感の実践を意味する。

  • You not only know how the person thinks and how they feel, you care about them.

    あなたは相手がどう考え、どう感じているかを知っているだけでなく、相手のことを気にかけている。

  • This is what you want in your parents.

    これこそ、あなたが両親に望むことだ。

  • This is what you want in your spouse.

    これこそ、あなたが配偶者に求めるものだ。

  • This is what you want in your lover.

    これこそ、あなたが恋人に求めるものだ。

  • This is what you want in your friends.

    これこそ、あなたが友人に求めるものだ。

  • And this is what you want in your teachers, doctors, leaders of any kind, people who have influence.

    教師、医者、あらゆる種類の指導者、影響力を持つ人々に望むことだ。

  • The fourth part of emotional intelligence is relationship management.

    エモーショナル・インテリジェンスの4つ目は、人間関係の管理である。

  • Can you handle conflicts well?

    衝突にうまく対処できるか?

  • Can you keep yourself calm and listen to the other person?

    落ち着いて相手の話に耳を傾けることができるか?

  • Are you being an effective communicator?

    あなたは効果的なコミュニケーターですか?

  • Full rapport means that you feel close, you feel you can work with this person, you can trust them.

    完全なラポールとは、親しみを感じ、この人となら一緒に仕事ができると感じ、信頼できることを意味する。

  • Unlike IQ, which barely budges over the course of our life, emotional intelligence can change.

    生涯を通じてほとんど変化しないIQとは異なり、情緒的知性は変化する可能性がある。

  • It's learned and learnable.

    それは学び、学ぶことができる。

  • And it's learned and learnable at any point in life.

    そして、それは人生のどの時点でも学ぶことができる。

  • Emotional intelligence is not one thing.

    エモーショナル・インテリジェンスはひとつではない。

  • It's like going to a doctor for physical.

    医者に健康診断を受けに行くようなものだ。

  • You get your lipids and your good cholesterol, bad cholesterol.

    脂質、善玉コレステロール、悪玉コレステロールがわかる。

  • You get 15 data points.

    15点のデータが得られる。

  • Emotional intelligence is a set of abilities, and each of us has strengths and limitations across that spectrum.

    エモーショナル・インテリジェンスは一連の能力であり、私たち一人ひとりには、そのスペクトルの中で強みと限界がある。

  • So if you want to improve your emotional intelligence, see where you need to improve first.

    だから、感情的知性を向上させたいのなら、まず自分がどこを向上させる必要があるのかを確認することだ。

  • One of the common colds of emotional intelligence is poor listening.

    エモーショナル・インテリジェンスによくある風邪のひとつに、「聞き下手」がある。

  • You know, we think about what we want to say, and we don't really listen to the other person.

    私たちは自分の言いたいことを考えるだけで、相手の話をちゃんと聞いていない。

  • We cut them off, we interrupt.

    彼らを切り捨て、邪魔をする。

  • Let's say you wanted to change that.

    それを変えたいとしよう。

  • This is a basic of empathy, listening well.

    これは共感の基本であり、よく聞くことだ。

  • So if you want to learn to be better at empathy, you might say, my habit, and I've done it thousands of times, is cutting people off and interrupting.

    だから、共感することをもっと上手に学びたいのなら、私の癖は、何千回もやっていることだが、人の話を遮ったり、遮ったりすることだ、と言えるかもしれない。

  • I'm going to make the effort to do it differently.

    私は違うやり方をする努力をするつもりだ。

  • I'm going to listen to the person out, say what I think they mean, and then say what I think.

    私は相手の話を最後まで聞き、相手の言いたいことを言い、そして自分の考えを言う。

  • That is a different behavioral sequence, and it comes down to the basics of what we call neuroplasticity, how the brain changes with repeated experience, and that's what underlies habit change.

    それは異なる行動シーケンスであり、私たちが神経可塑性と呼ぶものの基本に帰結する。

  • It's a little like crossing your arms in a new way.

    新しいやり方で腕を組むようなものだ。

  • Cross your arms in the old way, please.

    昔ながらのやり方で腕を組んでください。

  • Now cross them with the other arm on top.

    今度はもう一方の腕を上にして交差させる。

  • That feels uncomfortable.

    違和感がある。

  • That's what it's like to change a habit.

    習慣を変えるというのはそういうことだ。

  • So with listening, you have to first make an intentional effort.

    だからリスニングでは、まず意図的に努力しなければならない。

  • It might feel uncomfortable, but as you persist, it gets more and more comfortable until finally it's an automatic habit.

    不快に感じるかもしれないが、我慢しているうちにだんだん心地よくなり、最後には自動的に習慣となる。

  • That will stay with you for years.

    それは何年も心に残るだろう。

  • You know, I've gone around the world talking to different audiences, and one of the things I love to ask is,

    世界中を回って、いろいろな聴衆に話をするんだが、私が好きな質問のひとつは、あなたが好きなリーダーと嫌いなリーダーについて教えてください。

  • "Tell me about a leader you've loved and a leader you hate, and tell me one quality that makes a leader so good or so bad."

  • Basically, the leader you hate is low in emotional intelligence.

    基本的に、あなたが嫌うリーダーは感情的知性が低い。

  • They don't manage their emotions very well.

    彼らは自分の感情をうまくコントロールできない。

  • They blow up at people, don't empathize, they don't tune in, they don't understand how clueless they are.

    彼らは人に暴言を吐き、共感せず、同調せず、自分がいかに無知であるかを理解しない。

  • The leader you love is high in it.

    あなたが愛している指導者は、その中で高い位置にいる。

  • Having a boss with high emotional intelligence means you feel not only inspired, not only motivated, you feel supported, you feel guided.

    エモーショナル・インテリジェンスの高い上司を持つということは、触発され、やる気を起こさせられるだけでなく、サポートされ、導かれていると感じられるということだ。

  • You feel you have clarity about what's expected from you.

    自分に何が期待されているのかが明確になったと感じる。

  • You give your best in your best state, in the optimal state, not in a desperate, stressed-out state.

    自分のベストの状態、最適な状態でベストを尽くすのであって、自暴自棄になったり、ストレスに苛まれた状態でベストを尽くすのではない。

  • Research at the Yale School of Management has found that emotions are contagious, and they're most contagious from the leader outward.

    エール大学経営大学院の研究によると、感情は伝染するものであり、リーダーから外に向かって最も伝染する。

  • The leader is most often the sender of strong emotions, either negative or positive.

    リーダーは多くの場合、否定的であれ肯定的であれ、強い感情の発信者である。

  • This very research by Sehgal Barsadeh has shown that if the leader is in a negative mood, very anxious, for example, people on that team will catch that mood and performance goes down.

    セーガル・バーサデの研究によれば、リーダーがネガティブなムード、たとえば非常に不安なムードにあると、そのチームの人々はそのムードに流され、パフォーマンスが低下する。

  • If the leader is in a very positive mood, I feel really good, I feel enthusiastic, then people catch that positive mood and their performance as a team or as a group goes up.

    もしリーダーがとてもポジティブな気分で、私はとても気分がいい、私は熱狂していると感じていれば、人々はそのポジティブな気分を受け止め、チームやグループとしてのパフォーマンスが上がる。

  • So the leader's state is actually much more important on the ability of people to do good work than many people realize, particularly many leaders actually.

    つまり、リーダーの状態は、多くの人が思っている以上に、特に多くのリーダーが思っている以上に、人々が良い仕事をする上で重要なのだ。

  • But if you have a leader that you hate, for example, and sadly too many people do, then you really don't give your best.

    しかし、例えば嫌いな指導者がいた場合、悲しいことに多くの人がそうだ。

  • In fact, you're more likely to leave as soon as you can, particularly if you're talented.

    実際、特に才能のある選手であれば、できるだけ早く退団する可能性が高い。

  • So a leader with low emotional intelligence is actually draining the organization in the long term.

    つまり、感情的知性の低いリーダーは、長期的には実際に組織を疲弊させているのだ。

  • They may get results for the quarter by driving people, by stressing them out, but they're burning them out and they're going to lose good people.

    従業員を追い込み、ストレスを与えることで、その四半期の結果は得られるかもしれないが、従業員を燃え尽きてしまい、優秀な人材を失うことになる。

  • So in the short term, they may look good; in the long term, it's a disaster.

    だから短期的には良く見えるかもしれない。長期的には大失敗だ。

  • I once took a bus up Madison Avenue in New York City on a very hot, humid day.

    蒸し暑い日にニューヨークのマディソン・アベニューをバスで走ったことがある。

  • People had a kind of bubble around them like, don't touch me, don't talk to me.

    人々は、私に触れるな、話しかけるな、というような一種の泡を持っていた。

  • I had the bubble too.

    私もバブルを持っていた。

  • I got on the bus and the bus driver shocked me.

    バスに乗ったら、運転手に衝撃を受けた。

  • He looked at me and very warmly said, "Welcome to the bus. How's your day going?"

    彼は私を見て、とても温かく、バスにようこそ、と言った。調子はどうだい?

  • And then I realized sitting on the bus that he was carrying on a conversation with everyone on the bus.

    そしてバスの中で、彼がバスの中のみんなと会話をしていることに気づいた。

  • "You're looking for suits, are you? Well, there's a great sale up here on the right at this department store."

    スーツをお探しですか?このデパートの右側でセールをやっているんだ。

  • "Did you see the exhibit in the museum on the left?" On and on and on.

    左の博物館の展示をご覧になりましたか?延々と続く。

  • Then people would get off that bus and they'd been transformed from kind of grumpy to pretty upbeat.

    そうしてバスを降りた人たちは、不機嫌な顔から明るい顔へと変わっていくんだ。

  • It was kind of magical.

    ちょっと不思議な感じだった。

  • And years later, I saw an article in the New York Times about that bus driver.

    それから数年後、私はニューヨーク・タイムズでそのバス運転手についての記事を目にした。

  • His name, it turned out, was Govan Brown.

    彼の名前はゴーバン・ブラウンと判明した。

  • He had fans.

    彼にはファンがいた。

  • People would wait for his bus.

    人々は彼のバスを待っていた。

  • He got 3,000 letters saying what a great bus driver he was.

    彼は素晴らしいバス運転手だったという手紙を3,000通も受け取った。

  • Not one complaint.

    不満はひとつもない。

  • And he, it turned out, was the pastor of a church.

    彼は教会の牧師だった。

  • And he saw the people on his bus as part of his flock.

    そして、彼はバスに乗っている人々を自分の群れの一部と見なした。

  • He was tending to his flock.

    彼は群れの世話をしていた。

  • He had a purpose that was far greater than that of the New York Transit Authority, which is something like getting as many people to where they want to go on time as we can.

    彼には、ニューヨーク交通局のそれよりもはるかに大きな目的があった。それは、できるだけ多くの人々を時間通りに行きたい場所に連れて行くというようなことだ。

  • He had a splendid sense of what he was doing.

    彼は素晴らしいセンスを持っていた。

  • It gave a greater meaning to what he did.

    それは彼がしたことに大きな意味を与えた。

  • And he did it superbly.

    そして彼はそれを見事にやり遂げた。

  • I've always felt that the more emotional intelligence in society, the better.

    社会におけるエモーショナル・インテリジェンスは、高ければ高いほどいいと常々感じている。

  • I think we would have parents who are more effective in raising kids, who are kinder.

    より効果的に子供を育て、より優しい親を持つことができるだろう。

  • We'd have more compassion for each other in our interaction with friends and loved ones, as well as with strangers.

    友人や恋人、そして見知らぬ人と接するとき、私たちはもっとお互いを思いやることができるだろう。

  • I think we would care more about the environment, which is why I've been happy to be a kind of evangelist for emotional intelligence, if you will.

    だからこそ、私は感情的知性の伝道師のような存在になれたのだと思う。

  • I'm not the originator of the phrase.

    私はこのフレーズの発案者ではない。

  • I think I made it more famous.

    もっと有名になったと思う。

  • I just think it would make a better world.

    そのほうがいい世界になると思うんだ。

  • Get smarter faster with videos from the world's biggest thinkers.

    世界で最も偉大な思想家のビデオで、より速く賢くなろう。

  • To learn even more from the world's biggest thinkers, get Big Think Plus for your business.

    世界最大の思想家たちからさらに多くのことを学ぶには、ビッグ・シンク・プラスをご利用ください。

In the future, I think emotional intelligence will be one of several abilities that we need.

将来、エモーショナル・インテリジェンスは、私たちに必要ないくつかの能力のひとつになると思う。

字幕と単語
AI 自動生成字幕

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

A2 初級 日本語 感情 リーダー バス 能力 iq 共感

感情的に知的な人に共通する12の特徴(あなたも学べる)|Big Think+ (ビッグシンクプラス) ダニエル・ゴールマン (12 traits emotionally intelligent people share (You can learn them) | Daniel Goleman for Big Think+)

  • 23547 159
    VoiceTube に公開 2024 年 06 月 28 日
動画の中の単語