Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

AI 自動生成字幕
  • This is a photograph of a man whom for many years I plotted to kill.

    これは私が何年も前から殺そうと企んでいた男の写真です。

  • This is my father, Clinton George Bageye Grant.

    父のクリントン・ジョージ・ベージ・グラントだ

  • He’s called Bageye because he has permanent bags under his eyes.

    彼は目の下に永久的な袋があるので、ベーゲーと呼ばれています。

  • As a 10-year-old, along with my siblings, I dreamt of scraping off the poison from fly-killer paper into his coffee,

    10歳の頃、兄弟と一緒に、ハエ取り紙の毒を彼のコーヒーにこすりつけるのが夢だった。

  • grounded down glass and sprinkling it over his breakfast,

    グラスを下ろして、朝食に振りかけました。

  • loosening the carpet on the stairs so he would trip and break his neck.

    階段のカーペットを緩めて つまずいて首を折るようにした

  • But come the day, he would always skip that loose step, he would always bow out of the house without so much as a swig of coffee or a bite to eat.

    しかし、その日が来ると、彼はいつもその緩いステップをスキップして、彼はいつもコーヒーを一口飲んだり、一口食べたりすることなく、家を出て行ってしまいます。

  • And so for many years, I feared that my father would die before I had a chance to kill him.

    それで何年も前から、父が死ぬ前に殺されるのではないかと心配していました。

  • Up until our mother asked him to leave and not come back, Bageye had been a terrifying ogre.

    母に頼まれて出て行って帰ってこないまでは、バゲイは恐ろしい鬼だった。

  • He teetered permanently on the verge of rage, rather like me, as you see.

    彼は恒久的に怒りの瀬戸際にいた、むしろ私のように、ご覧のように。

  • He worked nights at Vauxhall Motors in Luton and demanded total silence throughout the house, so that

    ルートンのヴォクスホール・モータースで夜勤をしていた彼は家中に完全な沈黙を要求しました。

  • when we came home from school at 3:30 in the afternoon, we’d huddle beside the TV, and rather like safe crackers,

    午後3時半に学校から帰ってきたらテレビの横にうずくまって、むしろ安全なせんべいが好きだった。

  • we’d twiddle with the volume control knob on the TV so it was almost inaudible.

    テレビの音量調節のつまみをいじるので、ほとんど聞き取れませんでした。

  • And at times, when we were like this, so muchShhh,” so muchShhhgoing on in the house,

    こんな時もありましたが、家の中では「しーっ」となることが多く、「しーっ」となることが多かったです。

  • that I imagined us to be like the German crew of a U-boat

    ドイツのUボートの乗組員のようになることを想像していました

  • creeping along the edge of the ocean whilst up above, on the surface, HMS Bageye patrolled,

    海の端に沿って忍び寄る一方で、上の上で、表面で、HMS Bageyeは巡回した。

  • ready to drop death charges at the first sound of any disturbance.

    騒動の最初の音で死刑を取り下げる準備ができています。

  • So that lesson was the lesson thatDo not draw attention to yourself either in the home or outside of the home.” Maybe it’s a migrant lesson.

    そのレッスンは "家庭内でも家庭外でも自分に注目を集めてはいけない "というレッスンだったんですね。出稼ぎの教訓なのかもしれませんね。

  • We were to be below the radar, so there was no communication, really, between Bageye

    レーダーの下にいることになっていたので バギーとの間には何の連絡もなかった

  • and us and us an Bageye, and the sound that we most looked forward to,

    と私たちと私たちが最も楽しみにしていた音は、ベージュアイでした。

  • you know when youre a child and you want your father to come home and it’s all going to be happy

    子供の頃はお父さんが帰ってきてくれれば幸せになれると思っていたのに

  • and youre waiting for that sound of the door opening.

    ドアが開く音を待っているんだ

  • Well the sound that we looked forward to was the click of the door closing, which meant he’d gone

    私たちが楽しみにしていた音は ドアが閉まる音だった それは彼が出て行ったことを意味していた

  • and would not come back.

    と言って帰ってこない。

  • So for three decades, I never laid eyes on my father, nor he on me.

    だから30年間、私は父と目を合わせたことはなかったし、父も私と目を合わせたこともなかった。

  • We never spoke to each other for three decades, and then a couple of years ago, I decided to turn the spotlight on him.

    30年間お互いに話をしたことがなかったんですが、数年前に彼にスポットライトを当てることにしました。

  • You are being watched. Actually you are. You are being watched.”

    "あなたは見られている実際にそうだ"見張られている"

  • That was his mantra to us, his children.

    それが彼の子供たちへのマントラだった。

  • Time and time again he would say this to us.

    彼は何度も何度も私たちにこう言っていました。

  • And this was the 1970s, it was Luton, where he worked at Vauxhall Motors, and he was a Jamaican.

    そしてこれは1970年代のことで、彼はヴォクスホール・モーターズで働いていたルートンで、彼はジャマイカ人だった。

  • And what he meant was, you as a child of a Jamaican immigrant are being watched

    彼が言いたかったのは ジャマイカ移民の子供として 君は監視されているということだ

  • to see which way you turn, to see whether you conform to the host nation’s stereotype of you,

    ホスト国のステレオタイプに適合しているかどうかを見るために、あなたがどっちを向いているかを見るために。

  • of being feckless, work-shy, destined for a life of crime.

    犯罪の人生を送ることになってしまった

  • You are being watched, so confound their expectations of you.

    あなたは監視されているので、彼らの期待を混乱させるのです。

  • To that end, Bageye and his friends, mostly Jamaican,

    そのために、バギーとその仲間たちは、ほとんどがジャマイカ人だった。

  • exhibited a kind of Jamaican bella figura,

    ジャマイカのベラフィグラのようなものが展示されていた。

  • Turn your best side to the world, show your best face to the world.

    自分の最高の面を世界に向けて、最高の顔を世界に見せてください。

  • If you have seen some of the images of the Caribbean people arriving in the 40s and 50s,

    40~50年代のカリブの人たちが到着した映像を見たことがある人は、ぜひ見てみてください。

  • you might have noticed that a lot of the men wear trilbies.

    お気づきの方もいらっしゃるかもしれませんが、男性の多くはトリルビーを着用しています。

  • Now, there was no tradition of wearing trilbies in Jamaica.

    今では、ジャマイカにはトリルビーを身につける伝統はありませんでした。

  • They invented that tradition for their arrival here. They wanted to project themselves in a way that they wanted to be perceived,

    彼らはここに来るために その伝統を発明したのです彼らは自分たちが認識されるような方法で 自分たちを投影したかったのです

  • so that the way they looked and the names that they gave themselves defined them.

    彼らが自分自身に与えた名前が彼らを定義するように、彼らの見え方や名前が彼らを定義するように。

  • So Bageye is bald and has baggy eyes.

    だから、バゲはハゲていて、目がバゲている。

  • Tidy Boots is very fussy about his footwear.

    履き物にうるさいTidy Boots。

  • Anxious is always anxious.

    不安なのはいつも不安なこと。

  • Clock has one arm longer than the other.

    時計は片方の腕が長くなっています。

  • And my all time favorite was the guy they called Summerwear.

    昔から好きだったのはサマーウェアと呼ばれていた奴だ

  • When Summerwear came to this country from Jamaica in the early 60s, he insisted on wearing light summer suits, no matter the weather,

    60年代前半にジャマイカからサマーウェアがこの国に入ってきたとき、彼は天候に関係なく軽快なサマースーツを着ることを主張した。

  • and in the course of researching their lives, I asked my mom,

    と、自分たちの生活を調べているうちに、母に聞いてみました。

  • Whatever became of Summerwear?”

    "サマーウェアはどうなった?"

  • And she said, “He caught a cold and died.”

    "彼は風邪をひいて死んだ "と

  • But men like Summerwear taught us the importance of style.

    しかし、サマーウェアのような男性は、スタイルの大切さを教えてくれました。

  • Maybe they exaggerated their style because they thought that they were not considered to be quite civilized.

    自分たちのスタイルを誇張したのは、自分たちがかなり文明人とは思われていないと思っていたからかもしれません。

  • And they transferred that generational attitude or anxiety onto us, the next generation,

    そして、その世代的な態度や不安を、次の世代である私たちに転嫁したのです。

  • so much so that when I was growing up, if ever on the television, news, or radio a report came up about a black person committing some crime,

    私が子供の頃、テレビやニュース、ラジオで黒人が犯罪を犯したというニュースが流れたことがあれば、それを見ていました。

  • a mugging, a murder, a burglary, we winced along with our parents,

    強盗 殺人 強盗... 私たちは両親と一緒に泣きました

  • Because they were letting the side down.

    脇を甘やかしていたからだ。

  • You did no just represent yourself. You represented the group,

    あなたは自分を代表しただけではないグループを代表していた

  • and it was a terrifying thing to come to terms with, in a way, that

    それを考えると、ある意味では恐ろしいことでした。

  • maybe you were going to be perceived in the same light.

    もしかしたら、あなたも同じように認識されようとしていたのかもしれません。

  • So that was what was needed to be challenged.

    それこそが、挑戦されるべきことだったのですね。

  • Our father and many of his colleagues

    私たちの父と多くの仲間たち

  • exhibited a kind of transmission but not receiving. They were built to transmit but not receive.

    送信はしても受信はしないという種類のものでした彼らは送信はするが受信はしないように作られていました

  • We were to keep quiet.

    私たちは黙っていることになっていました。

  • When our father did speak to us, it was from the pulpit of his mind.

    父が私たちに話したのは心の中の説教壇からでした

  • They clung to certainty in the belief that doubt would undermine them.

    彼らは疑いが自分たちを弱体化させると信じて、確実性にしがみついていた。

  • But when I am working in my house and writing,

    でも、家の中で仕事をしていて、文章を書いている時は

  • after a day’s writing, I rush downstairs and I’m very excited to talk about Marcus Garvey or Bob Marley

    一日の執筆が終わると、あわてて下に降りてきて、マーカス・ガーヴィーやボブ・マーリーの話をするのが楽しみです。

  • and words are tripping out of my mouth like butterflies and I’m so excited that my children stop me, and they say,

    と言葉が蝶々のように飛び出してきて、子供たちに止められてしまいます。

  • Dad, Dad, nobody cares.”

    "パパ、パパ、誰も気にしない"

  • But they do care, actually. They crossover.

    でも彼らは気にしている交差するんだ

  • Somehow they find their way to you.

    どうにかして彼らはあなたのところに行くのよ

  • They shape their lives according to the narrative of you life,

    彼らは、あなたの人生の物語に従って自分の人生を形成しています。

  • As I did with my father and my mother, perhaps,

    父や母と同じように、たぶん。

  • And maybe Bageye did with his father.

    そして、バゲーは父親と一緒にやっていたのかもしれない。

  • And that was clearer to me in the course of looking at his life

    そして、それは彼の人生を見ているうちに明らかになりました。

  • and understanding, as they say, the Native American say, “Do not criticize the man until you can walk in his moccasins.”

    ネイティブアメリカンが言うように "モカシンを履いて歩けるようになるまで 男を批判するな"

  • But, in conjuring his life, it was okay and very straightforward to portray

    しかし、彼の人生を描く上では、それは大丈夫で、非常にストレートに描かれていました。

  • a Caribbean life in England in the 1970s with

    1970年代のイギリスでのカリブの生活と

  • bowls of plastic fruit, Polystyrene ceiling tiles,

    プラスチック製のフルーツのボウル、ポリスチレン製の天井タイル。

  • settees permanently sheathed in their transparent covers that they were delivered in.

    搬入された透明なカバーに永久的に覆われたセットティー。

  • But what’s most difficult to navigate is the emotional landscape between the generations,

    しかし、最もナビゲートが難しいのは、世代間の情緒的な風景です。

  • and the old adage that with age comes wisdom is not true.

    年を取ると知恵が出るという古い格言は真実ではありません。

  • With age comes the veneer of respectability and a veneer of uncomfortable truths.

    年齢を重ねると、尊敬の念と不快な真実のベニヤが出てきます。

  • But what was true was that my parents, my mother and my father went along with it,

    しかし、本当のことを言うと、両親も母も父もそれに付き合ってくれました。

  • did not trust the state to educate me. So listen to how I sound.

    国の教育を信用していなかったからだだから私の声を聞いてください

  • They determined that they would send me to a private school,

    私立の学校に行かせると決めていました。

  • but my father worked at Vauxhall Motors. It’s quite difficult to

    父はヴォクスホール・モーターズで働いていました。なかなか難しいことですが

  • fund a private school education and feed his army of children.

    私立学校教育に資金を提供し、子供たちの軍隊を養う。

  • I remember going on to the school for the entrance exam, and my father said to the priest, it was a Catholic school,

    受験のために進学したのを覚えていますが、父が神父さんに「カトリックの学校ですよ」と言っていました。

  • he wanted a betterheducationfor the boy,

    彼は少年のためのより良い「教育」を望んでいました。

  • but also, he, my father, never even managed to pass worms,

    それだけでなく、私の父は、ミミズをパスすることさえできませんでした。

  • never mind entrance exams.

    入試なんてどうでもいい

  • But in order to fund my education, he was going to have to do some dodgy stuff, So

    しかし、私の教育資金を賄うためには、彼は、いくつかのダサいことをしなければならないだろうと思っていました。

  • my father would fund my education by trading in elicit goods from the back of his car.

    父は私の教育資金として、車の後ろからエリクテットグッズを売買していました。

  • And that was made even more tricky because my father, that’s not his car by the way, my father aspired to have a car like that, but my father had a beaten-up Mini,

    それがさらに厄介なことになったのは、父の車ではなく、父はそんな車に憧れていたのですが、父はボロボロのミニを持っていたからです。

  • and he never, being a Jamaican coming to this country, he never had a driving license.

    ジャマイカ人としてこの国に来た彼は運転免許を持っていなかった

  • He never had any insurance or road tax or MOT.

    保険も道路税もMOTも一度も入っていなかった。

  • He thought, “I know how to drive. Why do I need the state’s validation?”

    彼は考えた "私は運転の仕方を知っているなぜ国の許可が必要なのか?"

  • But it became a little tricky when we were stopped by the police, and we were stopped a lot by the police.

    しかし、警察に何度も止められているうちに、ちょっと厄介なことになってしまいました。

  • And I was impressed by the way that my father dealt with the police.

    そして、父の警察への対応に感銘を受けました。

  • He would promote the policeman immediately,

    彼はすぐに警察官を昇進させるだろう。

  • So that P.C. Bloggs became Detective Inspector Bloggs

    ブロッグスが警部補になったのね

  • in the course of the conversation and wave us on merrily.

    会話の途中で、私たちを陽気に振ってくれます。

  • So my father was exhibiting what we in Jamaica calledplaying fool to catch wise.”

    父はジャマイカで言うところの "賢者を捕まえるための馬鹿げた遊び "をしていました。

  • But it lent also an idea that actually he was being diminished or belittled by the policeman,

    しかし、それは、実際には彼が警察官に矮小化されたり、侮辱されたりしていたという考えをも貸してくれた。

  • As a 10-year-old boy, I saw that, but also there was ambivalence toward authority.

    10歳の少年の私はそれを見ていましたが、権威に対するアンビバレンスもありました。

  • So on the one hand, there was a mocking of authority.

    だから一方では権威をあざ笑うようなこともあった。

  • But on the other hand, there was deference toward authority.

    しかし、その一方で、権威に対する尊敬の念があった。

  • And these Caribbean people had an overbearing obedience toward authority,

    そして、このカリブの人々は、権威に対する威圧的な従順さを持っていました。

  • which is very striking, very strange in a way, because

    それは非常に印象的で、ある意味では非常に奇妙なことです。

  • migrants are very courageous people. They leave their homes.

    移民はとても勇気のある人たちです彼らは家を出て行きます

  • My father and my mother left Jamaica and they travelled 4000 miles,

    父と母はジャマイカを離れ、4000マイルを旅した。

  • and yet they were infantilized by travel.

    それなのに旅行で幼児化していた。

  • They were timid, and somewhere along the line,

    彼らは臆病で、どこかの線上にいた。

  • the natural order was reversed. The children became the parents to the parent.

    自然の摂理が逆転したのです。子は親から親になった。

  • The Caribbean people came to this country with a five-year plan. They would work some money, and then go back.

    カリブ海の人々は5年計画でこの国に来ました。彼らは少し働いてお金を稼いでから帰るのです。

  • But they 5 years became 10, and 10 became 15, and before you know it, youre changing like wallpaper,

    でも彼らは5年が10年になり、10年が15年になり、いつの間にか壁紙のように変化しています。

  • and at this point, you know youre here to stay.

    この時点で、あなたはここにいることを知っています。

  • Although there’s still a kind of temporariness that our parents felt about being here,

    両親がここにいることに感じていた一時性のようなものは残っていますが。

  • but we children knew that the game was up.

    しかし、私たち子供たちはゲームが上がっていることを知っていました。

  • I think there was a feeling that they would not be able to

    という気持ちがあったのだと思います。

  • continue with the ideals of the life that they expected.

    彼らが期待していた理想の生活を続ける。

  • The reality was very much different.

    現実はかなり違っていました。

  • And also, that was true of the reality of trying to educate me.

    そして、それは私を教育しようとしている現実にも当てはまりました。

  • Having started the process, my father did not continue.

    プロセスを開始したが、父は続かなかった。

  • It was left to my mother to educate me,

    教育は母に任せていました。

  • and as George Lamming would say,

    とジョージ・ラミングが言うように

  • it was my mother who fathered me.

    私を育てたのは母です

  • Even in his absence, that old mantra remained. You are being watched.

    彼がいなくなっても、その古いマントラは残っていた。あなたは見張られている

  • But such ardent watchfulness can lead to anxiety.

    しかし、そのような熱心な警戒心が不安を招くこともあります。

  • So much so that years later, when I was investigating why so many young black men were diagnosed with schizophrenia,

    それほどまでに、数年後、なぜこれほど多くの若い黒人男性が統合失調症と診断されたのかを調べていたとき、私は、その理由を知っていました。

  • Six times more that they ought to be,

    あるべき姿の6倍。

  • I was not surprised to hear the psychiatrist say,

    精神科医に言われても驚きませんでした。

  • Black people are schooled in paranoia.”

    "黒人は被害妄想で学校に通っている"

  • And I wonder what Bageye would make of that.

    バゲはどうするんだろうな

  • Now I also had a 10-year-old son, and turned my attention to Bageye.

    さて、私にも10歳の息子がいて、ベージュに目を向けました。

  • And I went in search of him. He was back in Luton, he was now 82,

    彼を探しに行きました彼はルートンに戻っていて、今は82歳だった。

  • and I hadn't seen him for 30-odd years,

    彼とは30数年会っていなかった

  • and when he opened the door, I saw this tiny little man with lambent, smiling eyes,

    とドアを開けると、ランベントな微笑みを浮かべた目をした小さな男がいた。

  • and he was smiling, and I'd never seen him smile. I was very disconcerted by that.

    と笑顔を見せてくれました。私はそれに非常に呆れてしまいました。

  • But we sat down, and he had a Caribbean friend with him, talking some old time talk,

    でも、私たちは座って、彼はカリブ海の友人と一緒にいて、昔話をしていました。

  • and my father would look at me, and he looked at me as if I would miraculously disappear as I had arisen.

    と父は私を見て、私が起きたように奇跡的に消えてしまうような目で見ていました。

  • And he turned to his friend, and he said, "This boy and me have a deep, deep connection, deep, deep connection."

    そして、彼は友人の方を向いて、"この少年と私は、深い深い、深い、深いつながりを持っている "と言いました。

  • But I never felt that connection. If there was a pulse, it was very weak or hardly at all.

    でも、その繋がりを感じたことはありませんでした。脈があったとしても、非常に弱いか、ほとんどなかった。

  • And I almost felt in the course of that reunion that I was auditioning to be my father's son.

    そして、その再会の過程で、父の息子になるためのオーディションを受けているような気がしそうになりました。

  • When the book came out, it had fair reviews in the national papers,

    この本が出てきたときには、全国紙で公平な評価を得ていた。

  • but the paper of choice in Luton is not The Guardian, it's the Luton News,

    でも、ルートンの新聞はガーディアンではなく、ルートンニュースです。

  • and the Luton News ran the headline about the book, "The Book That May Heal a 32-Year-Old Rift."

    "32歳の裂け目を癒す本 "という見出しで ルートン・ニュースに掲載されました

  • And I understood that could also represent the rift between one generation and the next, between people like me and my father's generation,

    そして、それはある世代と次の世代、私のような人間と父の世代の間の溝を表していると理解していました。

  • but there's no tradition in Caribbean life of memoirs or biographies.

    しかし、カリブ海の生活には、回顧録や伝記の伝統はありません。

  • It was a tradition that you didn't chat your business in public.

    人前で仕事の話をしないのが伝統だったんですね。

  • But I welcomed that title, and I thought actually, yes, there is a possibility that this will open up conversations that we'd never had before.

    でも、そのタイトルは歓迎しましたし、実際にはそうですね、今までなかった会話が開ける可能性があるんじゃないかなと思いました。

  • This will close the generation gap, perhaps.

    これで世代間格差が縮まるのではないでしょうか。

  • This could be an instrument of repair. And I even began to feel that this book,

    これは修復の道具になるかもしれない。そして、この本はそう感じるようにさえなりました。

  • may be perceived by my father as an act of filial devotion.

    父が親孝行だと思っているのかもしれません。