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  • ( intro music )

  • Man 1: Come explore with us!

  • Man 2: I am like trembling right now!

  • Voiceover: I have the coolest job in the world.

  • Now we're building things to understand more

  • about the world around us.

  • Woman 1: I love this!

  • Man 3: That was insane.

  • ( cry of joy )

  • Voiceover: We found eight new species of fish.

  • Man 4: Look.

  • Man 5: This is what we lost.

  • Woman 2: It turns out

  • people really don't believe we can do this.

  • Voiceover: That's awesome, that's why I do what I do.

  • ( applause )

  • Boyd: And why don't we begin

  • with our Explorer-in-Residence.

  • We'll begin with Enric.

  • Enric: Great!

  • I'm going to tell you a little story now.

  • When I was a kid growing up on the Mediterranean coast of Spain

  • I was completely fascinated by the documentaries

  • that Jacques Cousteau showed us on TV.

  • Now, that was in the 70s and he showed us

  • these amazing coral reefs lots of sharks, whales,

  • sea lions, it was so fantastic.

  • But when I was swimming in the ocean,

  • when I was diving, when I was later the professor

  • at the University of California,

  • this what I saw.

  • Those coral reefs that he showed us were gone.

  • Places that I loved were less and less alive over time.

  • So I was studying human impacts in the ocean.

  • And I saw those dead reefs covered by algae

  • and slime and the big fishes were gone.

  • These fish that you can see

  • are smaller than my diving masks.

  • I quit my job as a professor

  • and I just started going to these remote places.

  • And I started this project that we call Pristine Seas.

  • The goal of this project is to go to the most remote,

  • uninhabited, untouched places in the ocean,

  • the wildest places in the ocean.

  • A coral reef that looks like this,

  • where the corals are alive and predators dominate.

  • And we combine exploration, scientific research,

  • compelling media and then we inspire

  • the leaders of the countries that own these places

  • to protect them in very large reserves.

  • In the last five years, we've been to nine places.

  • And we got five protected.

  • Covering a total of almost half a million square kilometers.

  • And in the next few years we are going to

  • a few more of these places to try to protect

  • the last places that still look like the ocean

  • that was thousands of years ago.

  • Thank you.

  • ( applause )

  • Boyd: Now Tristram Stuart

  • is gonna give us a little overview of his work quickly.

  • Tristram: We're chopping down rainforest

  • to grow more food but at the same time,

  • a billion people are hungry.

  • And yet we're wasting one third

  • of the world's food supply.

  • That is something of a tragedy

  • but I've made it my life's mission

  • to show that this is a colossal opportunity.

  • If we need to cut down our environmental impact

  • and increase food availability where it's needed most,

  • cutting food waste is a really good place to start.

  • These green beans show you just how simple

  • some of the solutions to food waste can be.

  • I draw your attention to the word trimmed.

  • These beans have been trimmed to size

  • to fit into these plastic containers.

  • That means that Kenyan farmers

  • growing these beans for export to European markets, are cutting

  • sometimes 30, 40 percent of the beans they've grown

  • in a country were the land and the water

  • that they're using to grow these beans

  • are scarce resources.

  • 20 tons a day of waste coming out of

  • this single depot, just outside Nairobi,

  • and contractors collecting this waste

  • have to sign a contract saying they won't feed

  • any of this good food to hungry people.

  • It will all be treated as waste.

  • We're paying for that crime in our supply chains.

  • What we did is four things.

  • First of all,

  • raise awareness through public campaigns

  • on ugly fruit and vegetables

  • and why these standards are unnecessary.

  • Number two, pass a law within the United Kingdom

  • saying that when supermarkets cause their suppliers to waste food,

  • they should share the cost of it.

  • Number three, help farmers in those countries

  • develop secondary markets

  • to get some of that food to markets.

  • And number four, work with the supermarkets

  • to change those standards.

  • We got Tescos to change the way they ask

  • for the beans to be trimmed.

  • They now trim only on one side of the bean

  • rather than two, it's not far enough.

  • They've gone half way but Kenyan farmers...

  • ( laughter )

  • ...are producing five percent more bean

  • per unit of production than they were before.

  • We did that in a few months.

  • Similar story with bananas in Ecuador.

  • That's the waste of one banana plantation

  • after one day of harvest.

  • Bananas in Costa Rica.

  • These are carrots being wasted

  • because they are too long

  • to fit into these supermarket plastic crates.

  • It's crazy and it's happening everywhere.

  • We have led a global revolution against food waste

  • by doing positive campaigning

  • and feeding the five thousand,

  • which is the name of our organization,

  • at an event that we used to launch our campaigns

  • where we feed five thousand people, all on food

  • that would otherwise be wasted,

  • "Filling bellies, not bins".

  • We also set up the Gleaning Network in Britain

  • and now across Europe were we take volunteers

  • to fields to harvest some of this unused crop

  • and get it people who are hungry

  • and also communicate about those basic,

  • original sources of food waste

  • and what we can do about it.

  • My next mission is to come to America.

  • I'm here now and I'm making friends.

  • ( applause )

  • And I will show you why it's most important.

  • What this shows is that America has

  • twice as much food in its shops and restaurants

  • than is actually required

  • to keep the population alive.

  • That is a huge opportunity to save money,

  • save resources, save impact on the environment.

  • We're gonna start with portion sizes

  • and we're gonna move up to the farms.

  • We're gonna cause a food waste revolution

  • here in America,

  • we're coming soon.

  • Thank you very much.

  • ( applause )

  • Boyd: Excellent.

  • And now Shivani Bhalla from our Big Cats initiative in Kenya.

  • Shivani: In under a century we have lost

  • over 90 percent of our planet's lions.

  • Where I'm from in Kenya

  • the situation is just as serious.

  • We have only two thousand lions left in our country.

  • We work to try and understand

  • why this is happening.

  • Lions are running out of space.

  • They also come in to contact with people.

  • The local people, whose livelihoods

  • depend on their livestock, are often targeted by lions.

  • In Samburu, in northern Kenya where I live,

  • our population has grown from 11 lions

  • to over 50 now as a result of conservation efforts.

  • I work with a team and our mission is

  • to promote the co-existence

  • between lions and people in northern Kenya.

  • We do this through a number of community programs.

  • One of which is our warrior program

  • known as Warrior Watch.

  • Here in this picture

  • you see three of the warriors I work with.

  • Previously neglected when it came to conservation,

  • these warriors are now wildlife ambassadors.

  • They're engaged in conservation.

  • We have 16 warriors now working in the region.

  • When we started the program,

  • we asked the warriors what would you like

  • in exchange for all this great wildlife information

  • that you give us?

  • And they said, we would like education.

  • We have never been to school.

  • These are young men aged between 15 to 25,

  • who've never had that opportunity to go

  • and learn how to read and write.

  • We've now changed this.

  • And over the last five years

  • all 17 of our warriors can read and write,

  • both in English and the national language, Kiswahili.

  • This picture was taken a couple of weeks ago

  • at our annual lion kids camp.

  • They've never seen a lion.

  • They've only heard negative experiences with lions.

  • They'd seen the remains of a camel

  • after a lion had preyed on them.

  • But we changed that,

  • we took these kids to see their first ever lion.

  • And their faces say it all.

  • As they saw their first lion

  • they whispered to me, Simba Simba.

  • ( laughter )

  • And this is what gives me hope for the future.

  • Thank you.

  • ( applause )

  • Boyd: And now Jack Andraka, our inventor.

  • Jack: So I suppose my story really began

  • when I was 13, when a close family friend,

  • who was like an uncle to me,

  • actually passed away from pancreatic cancer.

  • And when the disease hit so close to home,

  • I knew I needed to learn more.

  • So I went online to find answers

  • and what I had found really shocked me.

  • You see 85 percent of all pancreatic cancers

  • are diagnosed late, when someone has

  • less than a two percent chance of survival.

  • And as I looked deeper,

  • I found an even more shocking statistic.

  • You see there is currently no standard way

  • for detecting pancreatic cancer.

  • Our conventional method is the 60 year old technique.

  • I mean first off that's older than my dad...

  • ( laughter )

  • ...but also it costs $800 per test

  • and it's grossly inaccurate, missing 30 percent of all cancers

  • and thus is rarely ever used

  • for screening of pancreatic cancer.

  • So armed with eighth grade biology,

  • I decided to set out to change the field

  • of cancer diagnostics.

  • ( laughter )

  • Bit lofty of a goal but I was going to do it.

  • And so essentially what I did is

  • I stumbled across how we are currently diagnosing

  • these cancers and what we're doing is

  • we're looking at your blood stream

  • particularly for these variations in protein levels

  • and while it sounds extremely straightforward,

  • it's anything but because you have liters and liters of blood

  • which is about an innumerable numbers of these proteins.

  • So it's like trying to find a needle in a stack

  • of nearly identical needles.

  • However, undeterred due to my teenage optimism

  • or how some people label it,

  • complete and utter ignorance of the entire field,

  • I continued on and I essentially found

  • a database of 8000 proteins

  • that are found in your bloodstream

  • when you have these cancers.

  • Essentially I found this one protein

  • that I could use called mesothelin

  • and it's just your ordinary run of the mill type protein,

  • unless of course you have

  • pancreatic, ovarian or lung cancer.

  • In which case it's found in these very high levels

  • in your blood stream.