Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • I'm a grandmother.

    私はおばあちゃんです。

  • And as a grandmother,

    そして、おばあちゃんとして。

  • I want to share with mothers and fathers

    お母さんやお父さんと共有したい

  • how important it is that we never hit our children,

    子供を叩かないことがいかに大切か。

  • including spanking.

    スパンキングを含む。

  • My granddaughter just started kindergarten,

    孫娘が幼稚園に入ったばかりです。

  • and she loves school--I mean, she loves everything about school,

    彼女は学校が大好きで 学校のことは何でも大好きなんです

  • except for this one thing: reminder sticks.

    これを除いては...

  • She tells me that if you don't do what the teacher tells you to do,

    先生に言われたことをやらなければ、彼女は教えてくれます。

  • you have to give her a reminder stick.

    彼女に注意書きの棒を渡すんだ

  • But the trouble is you only have three, and if you give up

    困ったことに3つしかないし、あきらめたら

  • all three reminder sticks, you have to sit out recess,

    3本とも注意書きがあるから 休み時間には座らないといけない

  • and watch the other children play.

    と他の子供たちのプレイを見ています。

  • She's really worried that one day she's going to lose all three sticks.

    いつか3本とも無くなるんじゃないかと本気で心配しているそうです。

  • She says, "Jack--he loses all three sticks every day, grandma."

    彼女が言うには "ジャックは毎日3本の棒を失うんだよ、おばあちゃん "って。

  • I'm aware of how stressful this is, because she begins to play this game

    彼女がこのゲームを始めたので、これがどれだけストレスになっているかを自覚しています。

  • with me, where she's the teacher taking away reminder sticks,

    私と一緒にいて、彼女は教師である彼女が思い出させる棒を持ち去っている。

  • and I'm basically Jack.

    そして、私は基本的にジャックです。

  • I believe that children do well when they can,

    子どもはできるときにはうまくやるものだと思っています。

  • and the trouble is, with some kids like Jack,

    厄介なのはジャックのような子供がいることだ

  • it's much harder to do well.

    上手くやるのはもっと難しい。

  • So you know, she takes me to school,

    だから彼女は学校に連れて行ってくれる。

  • and points out all of her friends, she points to the boy over there

    彼女の友達を指差して、あそこにいる男の子を指差して

  • and she says, "That's Jack. He's annoying."

    彼女が言うには "それはジャックだ"彼はイライラする"

  • I'm like, "Is he now?"

    "彼は今?"って感じです。

  • I work with kids with behavior problems,

    私は行動に問題のある子供たちと一緒に仕事をしています。

  • so I'm interested in Jack, and I watch as the teacher says,

    ということで、ジャックに興味を持ち、先生が言うのを見ています。

  • "Now, boys and girls, get out your crayons,

    "さあ、少年少女よ、クレヨンを出しなさい。

  • we're going to make a portrait of your neighbor."

    "隣人の肖像画を作る"

  • And all the children are coloring, and what's Jack doing?

    子供たちはみんなぬりえをしていて、ジャックは何をしているのかな?

  • Oh, he's humming and he's picking the paper off the crayons,

    鼻歌を歌いながらクレヨンの紙を拾っている

  • and breaking the crayons into pieces.

    とクレヨンをバラバラに割ってみました。

  • He takes this little nub of a black crayon and starts making this big fat scribble.

    彼はこの小さな黒いクレヨンの先を取って、この大きな太い落書きをし始めます。

  • Now, the rule is you don't have to keep the portrait if you don't like it--

    肖像画が気に入らなければ 飼わなくてもいいというルールになっていますが...

  • if it doesn't--if you don't like it.

    気に入らなければ

  • And so, of course,

    だから、もちろん

  • Jack's scribble portrait goes right into the trash can.

    ジャックの落書きの似顔絵はゴミ箱に入ってしまう。

  • Then it's activity time, and you have to get an activity out of the cabinet.

    そうなると活動時間になってしまい、キャビネットから活動を取り出す必要があります。

  • So Jack's rifling through the cabinet but can't find

    ジャックはキャビネットを探し回っているが、見つからない。

  • anything of interest, so he snatches the pieces

    興味のあるものは何もないので、彼はピースをひったくる

  • from the boy next to him, and sits on them.

    となりの男の子から、その上に座っています。

  • And this goes on all day long.

    そして、これが一日中続く。

  • I mean, you've got to love Jack.

    つまり、ジャックを愛しているということ。

  • I had a mother once tell me:

    以前、母親に言われたことがあります。

  • "You only love these kids because you know what to do with them,"

    "子供たちを愛しているのは、子供たちをどうすればいいか知っているからだ"

  • Isn't that the truth, but I didn't always know what to do with them.

    それは真実ではありませんが、私はいつも何をしていいのかわからなかったのです。

  • My son was one of those wiggle worms/squeaky noise-makers,

    私の息子は、くねくね虫/鳴き声のノイズメーカーの一人でした。

  • that always had to sit right next to the teacher.

    いつも先生の隣に座らなければならなかった

  • Those of us that work with young children who struggle know that often

    苦労している幼い子供たちと一緒に仕事をしている私たちは、しばしば次のようなことを知っています。

  • they're from homes where the relationship to their parents is stressed.

    親との関係がストレスになるような家庭の出身者です。

  • And I wonder: what stresses Jack?

    そして、私は疑問に思う:何がジャックにストレスを与えているのでしょうか?

  • I read a study that asked little children what worries them most.

    小さな子供たちに何を一番心配しているのかを尋ねた研究を読んだことがあります。

  • Do you know what the most common response was?

    一番多かった反応を知っていますか?

  • Being spanked.

    お尻を叩かれること

  • Little children are worried about being hit by their parents.

    小さな子供は親に殴られることを心配しています。

  • And I'm worried, too, because spanking is a huge neurobiological stressor

    私も心配だよ スパンキングは神経生物学的な ストレス要因だからね

  • that can have long-term negative consequences.

    長期的に悪影響を及ぼす可能性があります。

  • I learned about this

    ということを知りました。

  • when I was studying the effects of trauma on brain development.

    脳の発達における外傷の影響を研究していた時に

  • Now, there's this monumental study that studies early stress, called

    初期のストレスを研究している記念碑的な研究があります

  • the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study,

    子ども時代の不利な経験に関する調査。

  • and what they're looking at, is that there's a dose-rate relationship

    彼らが見ているのは、線量率の関係があるということです

  • where the more early stress you have in childhood, family dysfunction,

    幼少期のストレス、家族の機能不全の方が初期のストレスが多いところ。

  • the greater your risk for all sorts of health problems.

    健康上の問題を抱えている人ほど、リスクが大きい。

  • So you can have a score of 0 to 10,

    ということで、0点から10点までのスコアを持つことができます。

  • and let's just say that your dad could be kind of mean

    君のお父さんは意地悪かもしれないと言っておこう

  • and sometimes physical when he was drinking,

    と、お酒を飲んでいた時には、時々物理的なこともありました。

  • and that your mother divorced him because of it.

    それが原因でお母さんが離婚したと

  • So your ACE score would be probably a four or more.

    だからACEのスコアはおそらく4点以上でしょう。

  • If you have an ACE score of four or more,

    エースの点数が4点以上の方は

  • you're two and a half times more likely to have cardiac disease,

    心臓病の可能性が2.5倍になります。

  • you're four and a half times more likely to be chronically depressed,

    慢性的にうつ病になる可能性が4.

  • you are five times more likely to struggle with alcoholism,

    あなたはアルコール依存症と闘う可能性が5倍になります。

  • twelve times more likely to attempt suicide when you're a teenager,

    10代の時に自殺未遂をする可能性が12倍になる

  • and thirteen times more likely to be an IV drug user.

    と13倍の確率で静脈内麻薬使用者である可能性が高い。

  • One in six middle-class Americans have an ACE score of four or more.

    アメリカの中流階級の6人に1人はACEのスコアが4点以上ある。

  • And if your ACE score is 6 or more, your life expectancy is 20 years less.

    そして、ACEスコアが6以上だと平均寿命が20年短くなります。

  • My ACE score is an 8.

    私のACEスコアは8点です。

  • The findings of this study are that adverse childhood experiences

    本研究で得られた知見は、幼少期の有害な経験が

  • are the leading cause of illness, death, and poor quality of life

    は、病気、死亡、生活の質の低下の主要な原因となっています。

  • in the United States.

    アメリカで

  • So, what is at the root of this family dysfunction?

    では、この家族機能不全の根本には何があるのでしょうか?

  • Well, it's family violence.

    まあ、家庭内暴力ですからね。

  • I worry: "Is Jack worried about being hit?"

    私は心配しています。"ジャックは殴られることを心配しているのでしょうか?"

  • After all, statistically speaking, either you or the person sitting next to you

    結局のところ、統計的に言えば、自分か隣に座っている人のどちらかが

  • on either side, has been physically abused by their parents as children.

    どちらか一方では、子供の頃に親から身体的虐待を受けたことがあります。

  • And I don't mean spanking.

    スパンキングじゃない

  • Domestic violence against children is over twice the rate of spousal abuse.

    子どもに対する家庭内暴力は、配偶者虐待の割合が2倍を超えています。

  • And in this country several children will die today

    そして、この国では今日、何人かの子供たちが死ぬだろう

  • from physical abuse at the hands of their own parents.

    実の親の手による身体的虐待から。

  • And we know that physical child abuse, usually begins with physical punishment.

    そして、私たちは、物理的な児童虐待は、通常、体罰から始まることを知っています。

  • Now you might be wondering, "How does early violence lead

    今、あなたは疑問に思っているかもしれません。

  • to all these long-term health problems?"

    "これらの長期的な健康問題のすべてに?"

  • Well, it's because the impact of early adversity,

    まあ、初期の逆境の影響だからな。

  • especially in the first five years of life,

    特に人生の最初の5年間は

  • is more like a brain injury, than a psychological one.

    は精神的なものというよりも、脳梗塞のようなものです。

  • So Jack, he's not just making poor choices,

    ジャックは悪い選択をしているだけではないんだな

  • his brain can't regulate.

    彼の脳は制御できない

  • Self-regulation is a neurobiological capability

    自己調節は神経生物学的能力である

  • to manage arousal, both physical and emotional.

    身体的にも感情的にも覚醒状態を管理します。

  • And children learn to self-regulate

    そして、子供たちは自己規制を学びます。

  • by co-regulating with a calm and regulated parent.

    冷静に落ち着いた親御さんとの共同調整で

  • So of course the most serious problem is when the parents themselves

    だから、もちろん一番の問題は、親自身が

  • are the source of the stress.

    がストレスの元になっています。

  • Now for Jack, he needs the close interaction of his teacher,

    今はジャックのために、彼は彼の先生の密接な相互作用を必要としています。

  • which, you know, kindergarten is like crowd control--twenty-five kids.

    幼稚園は群集管理みたいなものだ25人の子供がいるんだよ

  • So instead, what he does to self-regulate

    その代わりに、自己規制するために何をしているかというと

  • is he chews on erasers, he wiggles, he makes noises,

    消しゴムを噛んだり、くねくねしたり、音を立てたり。

  • and he walks around the room.

    と部屋の中を歩き回る。

  • These aren't bad behaviors. These behaviors regulate his brain.

    悪い行動ではないこれらの行動が彼の脳を制御している

  • If you have self-regulation problems, it's like having a dimmer switch

    自己規制に問題がある場合は、調光器のスイッチがあるようなもので

  • that's turned way up high. And it gets stuck,

    高くなってる動かなくなる

  • and it's really hard to turn it back down.

    とか言って引き返すのは本当に難しいです。

  • So how do we help Jack?

    どうやってジャックを助けるの?

  • The hardest thing to do is to stay calm and regulated ourselves.

    一番難しいのは、冷静になって自分を律することです。

  • To breathe, to remember to exhale,

    息を吸うこと、吐くことを忘れないこと。

  • and when Jack is too difficult, to walk away.

    と、ジャックがあまりにも難しいときには、歩いていく。

  • But if you can hang in there, then you mirror him,

    でも、そこで頑張れるなら、あなたは彼をミラーリングする。

  • like, "How awful that your artwork is in the trash can," and enjoy him,

    あなたの作品がゴミ箱に入っているなんて、なんてひどいんだ」みたいな感じで、彼を楽しませてあげてください。

  • because mutual enjoyment is regulating to the brain,

    なぜなら、相互に楽しむことが脳に調整されているからです。

  • and is very nourishing to brain development.

    と脳の発達に非常に栄養を与えてくれます。

  • So self-regulation is the foundation to further development.

    だから、自己規制は更なる発展のための基礎となるのです。

  • If you have problems early on, like if Jack has trouble early on,

    ジャックが早い段階で問題を抱えている場合は、ジャックが早い段階で問題を抱えている場合など

  • it can affect the ongoing development of his brain, so the impact

    それは彼の脳の進行中の開発に影響を与えることができますので、影響は

  • of early stress--sometimes you can't see it until Jack is a teenager.

    初期のストレスの... ジャックがティーンエイジャーにならないと 気づかないこともある。

  • In neuroscience, they call it the time-bomb effect.

    神経科学では「時限爆弾効果」と呼ばれています。

  • An example of this is a study of over 8,000 adolescents, and they found

    その一例として、8,000人以上の思春期の若者を対象にした研究では、以下のようなことがわかりました。

  • that the number of the times they're hit as children correlates directly

    子供の頃に殴られた回数が直接相関していることを

  • to the frequency that they will binge drink in adolescence.

    思春期に暴飲暴食をする頻度を調べてみました。

  • It just goes up and up and up. It's like, Whoa!

    上がって上がって上がって上がって それは、Whoa!のようなものです。

  • You know, Jack--he went from being annoying, to reaching adolescence

    ジャックは... 彼はうっとうしいから 思春期になったんだ

  • and becoming a bully.

    といじめっ子になってしまう。

  • He starts binge drinking because he can't feel good.

    気分が乗らないから暴飲暴食を始める。

  • He beats up his girlfriend because he can't handle being angry.

    怒られるのが耐えられなくて恋人を殴る。

  • He attempts suicide because he can't find enough comfort in relationships.

    人間関係に十分な安らぎを見いだせないために自殺を図る。

  • It's like, what happened?

    何があったの?

  • Well, whatever it was, it probably started before kindergarten.

    まあ、何にせよ、幼稚園の前から始まっていたんでしょうね。

  • So what's one thing we can do to help Jack?

    ジャックを助けるためにできることは?

  • We can reject all forms of domestic violence,

    家庭内暴力のすべての形態を拒否することができます。

  • including spanking.

    スパンキングを含む。

  • I mean, what is at the root of physical violence against children?

    というか、子供への身体的暴力の根底にあるものは何なのか?

  • Spanking is at the root.

    スパンキングは根っこにある。

  • It is the belief that we think it's OK to hit them.

    叩いてもいいと思っているのが信念です。

  • Spanking is physical violence against children.

    スパンキングは子供に対する身体的暴力です。

  • Now, many of you --most of you--I maybe would say,

    さて、あなた方の多くは...ほとんどの方は...私が言うのもなんですが。

  • have been spanked as children, and you turned out pretty well,

    子供の頃にお尻を叩かれたことがありますが、あなたはかなり良い結果になりました。

  • or reasonably well, like myself.

    私のように、あるいはそれなりにうまくいっている

  • And yet there's this avalanche of research, with over 93% agreement

    それなのに、93%以上の同意を得て、この雪崩のような調査が行われています。

  • that says that spanking cranks up the dial; it's related

    縁があるからこそ、スパンキングは文字盤を大きくする

  • to aggression, emotional problems, and physical problems.

    攻撃性、感情的な問題、身体的な問題に

  • So why is this?

    では、なぜなのか?

  • Well, it's because spanking can dysregulate

    スパンキングは制御不能になるからだ

  • the regulatory equipment. It can damage it.

    規制装置を破損する可能性があります。

  • So you might be thinking,

    と思っているかもしれませんね。

  • "Well, I spanked my child. Does that mean I damaged him?"

    "私は自分の子供にお仕置きをした"彼を傷つけたということか?"

  • Well, I've had to ask myself that very question.

    まあ、まさにその疑問は私自身にもありました。

  • When my stepson was small, he was jumping off the walls,

    義理の息子が小さい頃は、壁から飛び降りていました。

  • mostly because he was really distressed about his parents' divorce.

    ほとんどが、親の離婚に本気で悩んでいたからだ。

  • I was 18 years old, I didn't have a clue what to do with him

    18歳の私には何の手掛かりもなく

  • and so, like many parents, I spanked him.

    だから、多くの親のように、私は彼にスパンキングをしました。

  • It didn't work, you know, thankfully I found this counselor who helped me

    うまくいかなかったんだよ、ありがたいことに僕はカウンセラーを見つけたんだ。

  • get into my son's world and feel what it was like to be him.

    息子の世界に入り込んで、息子になった気分を味わう。

  • And once I was inside of his world, I never hit him again.

    彼の世界に入ってからは、二度と彼を殴ることはなかった。

  • Did spanking damage him? You know, my son is a very accomplished person.

    スパンキングは息子にダメージを与えたのか?うちの息子は、とても優秀な人なんですよ。

  • He's an incredible physical athlete.

    彼は信じられないほどのフィジカルのある選手です。

  • He's one of our nation's heroes: he's served several tours in Afghanistan.

    彼は我が国の英雄の一人であり、アフガニスタンで何度か任務に就いている。

  • He's a professional firefighter. He's a loving husband and a loving father.

    彼はプロの消防士で愛する夫であり 愛する父親でもあります

  • He's one of my favorite people.

    私の好きな人の一人です。

  • And he has trouble with self-regulation.

    そして、彼は自己規制に悩んでいます。

  • He can get scattered, he can over-respond to threat.

    彼は散らばってしまうこともあるし、脅威に過剰に反応してしまうこともある。

  • Like, what about the time his high school teacher got in his face

    高校の先生が彼の顔に 襲いかかってきた時はどうだった?

  • and he was poking him in the chest, and he nearly broke his hand?

    と胸を突かれて手の骨が折れそうになった?

  • Even now my son has to physically exercise regularly.

    今でも息子は定期的に身体を動かしています。

  • Kind of like the adult equivalent of being a wiggle worm,

    大人になってからのヅラした虫のようなものだな

  • and needing to move.

    と移動する必要があります。

  • And if he doesn't he gets scattered.

    そうしないと散らかってしまう。

  • I just wish he didn't have to work so hard.

    頑張らなくてもいいのにと思ってしまう

  • But the problem is: spanking is a family tradition.

    しかし、問題は、スパンキングは家族の伝統です。

  • My grandmother's mom would say: "I'm going to give you some peach tea."

    祖母の母が言うには"桃のお茶をあげるわ "って

  • And that meant my grandmother had to go out to a peach tree and cut off a stick

    祖母は桃の木に行って棒を切り落とさなければならなかった

  • and take it to her mom to beat her with it.

    と母親に持って行き、それを持って母親を叩きのめす。

  • You know, my father's generation, they don't believe in

    親父の世代は信じてないんだよな

  • hitting kids with sticks-- they spank them with a belt or a spoon.

    子供を棒で殴る... ベルトやスプーンで スパンキングするんだ

  • And my generation? We're still holding on to this idea

    そして、私の世代は?私たちはまだこの考えにしがみついている

  • that you can just smack them on the bottom with an open hand.

    開いた手で底辺を叩けばいいんだと。

  • It's just watered down peach tea.

    桃茶を水で薄めただけのものです。

  • You know, it causes me a sickening sadness when I think about

    考えると気持ち悪いほどの悲しみに襲われます

  • that I spanked my son when he was small.

    息子が小さい時にお尻を叩いてしまったこと。

  • And I understand mothers will feel defensive,

    母親が身構えてしまうのもわかる。

  • because after all, "Society says it's OK." and, "I'm doing the best I can."

    結局は「社会がいいって言ってくれるから」「自分ができる限りのことをしているから」です。

  • I know, I know.

    わかってますよ、わかってますよ。

  • But I think we owe it to our children to reject spanking.

    しかし、スパンキングを拒否するのは子供の義務だと思います。

  • We must stop giving stressed out parents permission to strike their children.

    ストレスを溜め込んだ親に子供を叩く許可を与えるのはやめよう。

  • You know 50% of toddlers are hit more than three times a week.

    幼児の50%は週3回以上叩かれているのを知っていますね。

  • Can you just imagine how you'd feel

    あなたがどう感じるか想像できる?

  • if your spouse were smacking you a couple times a week?

    配偶者に週に2、3回叩かれていたら?

  • Spanking is sanctioned violence against children.

    スパンキングは子供に対する制裁のある暴力です。

  • If we were to end spanking we would change the brains of an entire generation.

    もしスパンキングを廃止すれば、世代全体の脳みそを変えることになる。

  • How do we help Jack?

    どうやってジャックを助けるの?

  • Oh, we've got to slow down.

    ああ、スピードを落とさないと。

  • We've got to get down on the floor with Jack, and touch him

    ジャックと一緒に床に伏せて 触れるんだ

  • and be present, and let go of what we need Jack to do

    ジャックに必要なことを手放すんだ

  • and engage in what he's actually doing.

    と実際にやっていることに関わる。

  • Treasure his scribble portraits and mirror his frustration

    彼の落書き似顔絵を大切にして、彼の悔しさを鏡に映し出す

  • and pick the paper off the crayons with him.

    とクレヨンの紙を一緒に拾う。

  • And let him feel just how much we really love being with him.

    そして、彼と一緒にいることがどれだけ好きなのかを彼に感じさせてあげてください。

  • And if you see another child being hit,

    他の子が殴られているのを見たら

  • Stand up and say, "Stop!"

    立ち上がって "やめろ!"と言って

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

I'm a grandmother.

私はおばあちゃんです。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 ジャック スパン キング 子供 ストレス クレヨン

TEDx】暴力-家族の伝統。ロビン・ピーターズ・ベネット氏、TEDxBellinghamにて

  • 16016 1571
    林雅歌 に公開 2014 年 08 月 21 日
動画の中の単語