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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hello, everyone, and welcome back to English with Lucy.

  • Today, I have a vocabulary lesson for you.

  • In today's lesson, we are going to discuss 50, yes, 50.

  • But don't worry, it won't be too much,

  • 50 advanced adjectives

  • that you can use to describe personality.

  • These words are more advanced

  • so you can give really accurate descriptions of people.

  • In this video we will also focus on pronunciation.

  • I have included the phonetic transcription for each word

  • plus their meaning and a little chat

  • about where they can be used.

  • I have also created a free PDF

  • that goes along with this lesson.

  • It contains all of the words that we discussed

  • along with their pronunciation and their meaning.

  • And I have included a little quiz at the end

  • so that you can test your understanding.

  • If you'd like to download that PDF,

  • just click on the link in the description box.

  • You enter your name and your email address

  • and I send the PDF directly to your inbox.

  • By doing this, you sign up to my mailing list,

  • meaning that every week, as soon as the PDF is available,

  • I'll send it straight to you.

  • You don't need to sign up every time.

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  • Before we get started,

  • I would like to thank the sponsor of today's video,

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  • Right, let's get started with the vocabulary lesson.

  • So I have got 25 positive personality adjectives

  • and 25 negative personality adjectives.

  • Which ones do you think we should start with?

  • I think I'm going to start with positive

  • so we can raise everyone's mood

  • and then bring you back down again.

  • Just how I like it.

  • Number one is adaptable, adaptable.

  • If somebody is an adaptable person,

  • it means they are someone who is able to change

  • to successfully deal with new situations,

  • especially difficult ones.

  • You could say she's a great social worker

  • because she's so adaptable.

  • She's such an adaptable person.

  • We also have number two, which is affable, affable.

  • This could be used to describe somebody

  • who is pleasant, polite, and easy to talk to.

  • It's a very positive word.

  • He was incredibly affable with me when I forgot my ticket.

  • Number three: ambitious, ambitious.

  • This is usually positive, but sometimes depending on tone,

  • it can be slightly negative as well.

  • It describes somebody who is determined

  • to be rich, powerful, and successful.

  • He's very ambitious and I think he'll do very well in life.

  • Number four, this is a lovely one: amicable, amicable.

  • This is a way of saying that somebody is polite and friendly

  • and can manage situations without arguments.

  • He seemed very amicable on the telephone,

  • so I was shocked at his rude email.

  • Number five is bright, bright.

  • And a lot of learners of English misunderstand this word

  • because it also means shining, you know, a source of light.

  • When we're using it to describe people,

  • it usually means intelligent or clever.

  • You're a bright girl, I know you'll pass the exam.

  • You're an intelligent or clever girl.

  • Number six is broad-minded, broad-minded.

  • I mentioned a couple of videos back narrow-minded,

  • this is the opposite.

  • Narrow-minded, broad-minded.

  • It means that you are willing to understand

  • and listen to other people's opinions

  • even if they're different from your own.

  • Luckily, our boss is quite broad-minded,

  • so I'm sure he won't mind you wearing that today.

  • I wonder what that person was wearing

  • for a boss to have to be broad-minded.

  • We also have number seven: conscientious, conscientious.

  • This can be used to describe people who take care

  • to do things carefully and correctly.

  • His conscientious manner makes him a fantastic engineer.

  • Number eight: convivial, convivial.

  • This simply means cheerful and friendly.

  • She was a convivial party host

  • who made everyone feel welcomed.

  • We also have number nine: courteous, courteous.

  • I really like that word, courteous.

  • This means polite and respectful.

  • If somebody is courteous,

  • they are a respectful and polite person.

  • I can't believe how courteous

  • the school children were today.

  • I remember it was such an honour

  • to be called courteous at school.

  • Number 10 is decisive, decisive.

  • And like many of these,

  • it does depend on context and tone of voice.

  • This is used to describe somebody who is able

  • to decide quickly and with confidence.

  • She's quite decisive,

  • so I don't think she'll change her mind.

  • Number 11 is determined, determined.

  • Very similar to ambitious in a way,

  • but in particular, this is used to describe people

  • who are able to continue trying to do something

  • even if it's difficult.

  • Her determined nature made her the perfect Olympian.

  • Number 12: diplomatic, diplomatic.

  • If I can think of anyone who's diplomatic, it is my father,

  • the most diplomatic man on earth, I think.

  • It means that he's able to deal

  • with people in difficult situations.

  • If some people are having an argument

  • in front of him, he can say,

  • now, now, everyone, let's sit down, talk it out.

  • Let's find an arrangement that's mutually beneficial.

  • With my dad, it's all about compromise.

  • My dad's diplomatic nature made him a great boss.

  • Number 13, this one is used to describe my husband-to-be,

  • easy-going, (laughs) easy-going,

  • also laid-back might be another alternative.

  • This is used to describe people who are relaxed

  • and happy to accept things

  • without worrying or stressing or getting angry.

  • That's my fiance in a nutshell.

  • We often say he's so laid-back

  • that he's actually horizontal.

  • I don't think I've ever seen him get really stressed.

  • An example, he's an easy-going guy with a carefree attitude.

  • Number 14 is exuberant, exuberant.

  • This means full of energy, happiness, and excitement.

  • And do you know what? Today I think that describes me.

  • I do feel particularly full

  • of energy, happiness, and excitement.

  • An example: her exuberant nature exhausted me.

  • Number 15, this is my mum's favourite word,

  • not favourite, but she uses it a lot: frank, frank.

  • It's sometimes positive and sometimes negative,

  • it's actually quite neutral.

  • If somebody is frank, it means they are honest and direct,

  • especially in what they say.

  • So they say things without worrying too much

  • about if it will offend people.

  • If anyone is ever rude to my mum,

  • she will then describe them to me as frank.

  • She's quite frank.

  • He was very frank with me,

  • which means he was bloody rude to me.

  • She's very frank, but she gets results.

  • That's a good sentence.

  • Number 16 is gregarious, gregarious.

  • This simply means sociable.

  • I think you'll get on well as you're both so gregarious.

  • Number 17: intuitive, intuitive.

  • This means you're able to understand something or someone

  • by using feelings rather than using facts

  • or understanding the facts.

  • She's a great teacher because she's so intuitive.

  • She understands what her students need

  • without having to ask them.

  • Number 18 is inventive, inventive.

  • This means imaginative or creative,

  • able to think of new ideas, new ways of doing things.

  • I'm sure he'll find a use for your broken television.

  • He's incredibly inventive.

  • Number 19 is modest, modest.

  • This is used to describe somebody

  • who doesn't talk about how great they are.

  • They don't boast or talk

  • about their abilities or their possessions.

  • If somebody understates something, if somebody says,

  • oh, my English, isn't that good,

  • but their English is very good,

  • you can say, I think you're being a bit modest there.

  • We also use it sarcastically.

  • If somebody does show off, we go,

  • oh, modest, you're very modest. (laughs)

  • Number 20 is pioneering, pioneering.

  • This is used to describe early adopters,

  • people who start to do something first

  • and then others follow.

  • An example: she had an affair

  • with a pioneering cryptocurrency investor.

  • Number 21 is placid, placid.

  • And this is positive leaning towards neutral.

  • It could also be used to describe somebody a bit boring,

  • but it means not easily excited, very calm.

  • Don't worry about her dog, he's very placid.

  • He won't jump up.

  • Number 22 is proactive, proactive.

  • This is used to describe somebody who makes things happen.

  • They don't wait for things to happen,

  • they make things happen.

  • She's very proactive when it comes to her work life,

  • but her personal life is very different.

  • Me.

  • 23 is quick-witted, quick-witted.

  • And this means very intelligent, very able to think quickly

  • or very quick to respond with funny or witty comments.

  • I wouldn't heckle the comedian, he is very quick-witted.

  • To heckle is to shout something at a comedian

  • or a performer from the audience,

  • usually in order to get a reaction.

  • Number 24 is resourceful, resourceful.

  • If somebody is resourceful, they are good at finding ways

  • of doing things or solving problems.

  • We didn't have much money growing up,

  • but our mother was very resourceful.

  • And number 25, the last positive adjective

  • is versatile, versatile.

  • This means able to do many things.

  • My personal assistant is incredibly versatile.

  • She's able to do all sorts of things.

  • Unfortunately, all good things come to an end

  • and now we've got to talk about the negative adjectives,

  • but they are quite fun.

  • They're good for talking about people.

  • Number one is aloof, aloof.

  • I could have described my old dog as aloof.

  • It means not friendly, not interested in other people.

  • We had a sausage dog, a dachshund,

  • and she came to you on her own terms.

  • She was not friendly, she was aloof.

  • Number two is belligerent, belligerent.

  • What a wonderful word to say.

  • This means unfriendly and aggressive.

  • His belligerent attitude drove me up the wall.