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  • For some of us, food is one of our favorite things, a little hint of pleasure in a difficult

  • and painful world

  • But, c'mon, what's better?

  • Hot food or cold food?!

  • The debate rages on and on, hot or cold.

  • And this being viewer question Monday, VinylSnapz wanted to know "How come hot food tastes better

  • than cold or warm food?

  • Is it an evolutionary thing?"

  • Well Vinyl, yes, yes it is.

  • Some people are all like, "I can't cook, lol," but cooking is what allowed us to evolve these

  • huge brains which we enjoy today!

  • Yay, hot food!

  • Before the mastering of fire, ancient hominids ate cold food; they had no other choice!

  • Cold, uncooked food requires a lot more energy to digest.

  • Think about it this way: gorillas chew all day just break down food for digestion; pandas

  • eat for up to 16 hours a day; cows have four stomachs and have to regurgitate their cud

  • for chewing and swallow it againyikes.

  • And, yes, these are all herbivores, but I'll get to that in a sec.

  • Plants are especially difficult to break down.

  • So, why don't we eat like gorillas?

  • Because we learned to break down food outside of our bodies.

  • We made it easier on ourselves.

  • Damn we're lazy, lazy like a fox!

  • Actually, foxes are carnivoressoanywayyou get it.

  • We're smart and lazy.

  • In all the animal kingdom, humans are the best at off-loading our biological responsibilities.

  • We create tools to do things our fingers can't, we wear clothes to keep us warm, we craft,

  • build, invent and think our way around problems, but our first big breakthrough?

  • Cooking.

  • Two MILLION years ago, we were eating cold food all day errday, just like our primate

  • cousins, and then we got some fire and put the two together.

  • Homo Erectus started using fire to stay warm, ward off predators, forge weapons, allow for

  • more REM sleep and cook some tasty morsels.

  • Fire is an exothermic chemical reaction; it produces heat while chemically altering the

  • wood.

  • When that heat is applied to foods like grains or meats, it chemically alters the food, too

  • -- and in many cases, it does so to our benefit!

  • Rather than eating being all about chewing and the juices in our stomachs, cooking gave

  • us more bang for our bite, so to speak.

  • Two million evolutionary years later, we can no longer eat entirely raw or cold food as

  • our primate or carnivore cousins do, we don't have the guts!

  • LITERALLY.

  • See, carnivores can eat a large quantity of raw meat because they have stronger stomach

  • acids, and have a shorter intestinal tract.

  • All this evolved to harbor less bacteria, and reduce food-borne bacteria infection,

  • we don't have those evolutionary traits.

  • According to Rachel Carmody, Evolutionary Biologist at Harvard, fire gave us a biological

  • advantage because hot food has essentially been pre-digested!

  • When we heat something, we increase the number of calories available in the food, occasionally

  • at the expense of some of the nutrients.

  • By the time cooked food gets to the small intestine, we're sucking energy out of it

  • left and right.

  • This isn't just meats, it's also grains!

  • According to Carmody's studies, we get 30 percent more energy from cooked oats, wheat,

  • or potato than raw, and 78 percent more protein from eggs.

  • Other studies, too, found digestibility improvements: 10 percent in chickpeas and 90 in legumes

  • and starches.

  • Once we invented cooking, we didn't have to forage for food constantly, nor did we have

  • to sit around chewing all the time.

  • Because of that, we were able to evolve smaller guts and larger brains, then we began to solve

  • problems, explore the planet, build the internet, and deliver this video to you!

  • We've talked about this on DNews before!

  • When anthropologists and scientists flossed the teeth of neanderthals back in 2011, they

  • found cooked grains!

  • We've been at this for a while.

  • A study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B recently found chimps had learned to "cook"

  • food, though they'd actually, learned to prefer hot food given to them by researchers.

  • Though the point remains, even chimps know hot food is easier to eat!

  • So yes, VinylSnapz, we evolved to eat hot food.

  • So much so, that in one study of raw-food dieters, quote "half the women were malnourished"

  • and their bodies shut down menstruation, likely to prevent lost nutrients.

  • Cold or raw food takes SO much more energy for the modern human to digest!

  • That doesn't mean it's bad for you, though.

  • Hot food has more excited molecules which give off smells, and add flavors.

  • Scientists think taste evolved to keep us eating the things that were GOOD for us and

  • avoid poisons and rotten food, which taste bad.

  • Food packed with energy like meats, fish, nuts, berries, starches, and so on, taste

  • good, thus, we want to eat more.

  • When cooked, the molecules in the food are more excited, and volatile -- i.e. they fly

  • off into the air, and we smell them.

  • That makes food better too, and is probably why we like it served hot.

  • It's easier to digest, and it's more pleasing to the senses!

  • What do you prefer?

  • Hot or cold food?

  • Hey Guys, if you like the shirt i have on and want to check out other

  • DNews shirts be sure to go to forhumanpeoples.com/collections/dnews.

  • We have a ton of cool science shirts for your buying pleasure.

  • AND if you're a first time buyer use the promo code DNEWS for 10% off

  • at checkout.

For some of us, food is one of our favorite things, a little hint of pleasure in a difficult

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Why Does Hot Food Taste Better Than Cold Food?

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    joey joey に公開 2021 年 04 月 17 日
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