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  • I have bad news.

  • A Gallup Student Poll recently found that,

  • the longer kids stay in school,

  • the less engaged they become.

  • In elementary school,

  • three quarters of students are engaged.

  • In high school, it's less than half.

  • It's as if they are just going on a slide

  • down into the pool.

  • Everyday, 8,300 students drop out of school.

  • That's over 3 million students every year.

  • Unless we make a critical turnaround fast,

  • our students are gonna turn into zombies.

  • But we can make this turnaround happen.

  • We can support them in a new type of learning environment.

  • A curiosity driven learning environment.

  • Think about this:

  • 9 out of 10 of today's elementary, middle and high school students

  • believe that mobile technology will change the way they learn in the future,

  • and make learning more fun.

  • In fact, 56% of today's high school students own smartphones

  • and this number is only going to be higher in the future.

  • For the longest time, we used papers, pencils, erasers,

  • to share what we've learned and our observations.

  • But, times have changed

  • and, as an educator,

  • I've noticed students in the US, Japan and France

  • use mobile technology to share, communicate and interact with each other.

  • It's time to start adding mobile technologies to classrooms.

  • Now, I know that there are critics of this,

  • there are privacy issues,

  • kids can take silly photos.

  • But the benefits of having these students learn to use

  • mobile technology as research tools

  • outweighs all these challenges.

  • It's time to start thinking about

  • how these students should learn to use the mobile technologies.

  • So I started thinking: "How may we use mobile technology

  • to address that issue of the student engagement slump that we saw?"

  • And with this question in mind

  • I worked on a solution with fellow educators and designers

  • from Harvard graduate school of education and MIT media lab

  • called "curious learning".

  • We designed a learning platform and environment

  • where students can use mobile technology as real world observation tools.

  • After learning a new concept or theory, they can go and explore

  • and find evidences or examples of what they've just learned.

  • They can even share their curiosities and observations

  • with their classmates and their teachers.

  • We call this the curious learning cycle.

  • The teacher assigns real world assignments to their students,

  • that complements classroom curriculum.

  • For example, they can ask students to find

  • examples of geometric patterns for math or polination for biology.

  • And then students go out into the real world

  • and find examples and evidences of what they've been learning.

  • And to complete the cycle,

  • the teacher facilitates a discussion

  • based on the students' curiosities and observations

  • and brings those photos back into the classroom.

  • Take John for example.

  • He is learning about fractals in his math class.

  • What's a fractal?

  • It's an infinitely complex and self-similar pattern.

  • John's teacher asked his class to go out

  • into the city and find an example of a fractal.

  • John decides to go to Golden Gate Park,

  • and he is amazed to see that there are examples of fractals everywhere,

  • and he decides to take a photo of an interesting leaf

  • and share it with his class.

  • His classmate Anna, she decides to go to the piers.

  • She also finds an interesting plant

  • but she isn't quite sure whether this is a fractal or not.

  • So, she decides to take a photo, to ask her class.

  • And the next day, John's teacher

  • collects all these photos and they discuss

  • and share and compare them with each other.

  • Remember that sudden engagement slump that we saw ?

  • Lets reverse it!

  • As students, educators and designers and more,

  • we can imagine and create these new learning environments

  • that allow teachers to connect the curricular content

  • with student observations.

  • We can do this three ways.

  • First, we can allow students to have a voice with their curriculum,

  • to be more engaged with their curiculum.

  • Second, we can give them mobile devices

  • to make learning more fun and accessible to them.

  • And third we can allow more opportunities

  • for students to discover the real world.

  • As an educational technology specialist,

  • I want to increase student engagement,

  • both inside and outside the classroom.

  • These students want to see mobile technology in their learning environment.

  • It's part of their daily routine to take photos

  • and share them with each other.

  • In fact, the word "selfie"

  • was the 2013 Oxford dictionary word of the year.

  • So, why not let these students

  • use taking photos

  • as an opportunity to learn?

  • These are going to be

  • the lifelong, passionate and curious learners.

  • Instead of looking like bored zombies,

  • they'll look like Curious George

  • or Indiana Jones.

  • And with the tools and technologies that we have,

  • the possibilities are endless.

  • Thank you

  • (Applause)

I have bad news.

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B1 中級

TEDx】キュリオシティ・ドリブン・ラーニング。坂口亜矢 at TEDxBeaconStreet (【TEDx】Curiosity driven learning: Aya Sakaguchi at TEDxBeaconStreet)

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    Hhart Budha に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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