Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • This is Larry. He's a squirrel.

    こちらはラリーリスなんだ

  • He likes nuts.

    ナッツが好きなんだ

  • In 2019, he went into an electric box in Kettering, Ohio.

    2019年、オハイオ州ケタリングの電気ボックスに入った。

  • Is this a nut? It was not a nut.

    これはナッツですか?ナッツではありませんでした。

  • He broke the electric box.

    彼は電気ボックスを壊した

  • And caused a blackout for 20,000 people.

    そして2万人分の停電を起こした。

  • Larry isn't alone. Squirrels do this all the time.

    ラリーは一人じゃないリスはいつもこうだ

  • Here's a map of their exploits, just last year.

    去年だけだが、彼らの功績の地図はここにある。

  • But here's the thing: Blackouts happen all the time, for all kinds of reasons.

    しかし、ここで問題なのは、ブラックアウトは様々な理由で常に起こるということです。

  • Like wildfires.

    山火事のように

  • Or storms.

    もしくは嵐。

  • And in the last half-century, there have been more and more power outages because of weather.

    そして、ここ半世紀で天候による停電が増えてきました。

  • And it'll only get worse because of our changing climate.

    気候の変化で悪化するだけだからな

  • The way we power the world is fragile.

    世界のパワーの出し方が脆い。

  • But there's a way to make it more resilient.

    でも、もっと弾力性を持たせる方法があります。

  • Our current energy system looks like this:

    現在のエネルギーシステムはこんな感じです。

  • Right on top are power plants, which get their energy from a variety of sources:

    右上には発電所があり、様々なエネルギー源からエネルギーを得ています。

  • like fossil fuels, wind and the sun.

    化石燃料や風や太陽のように

  • They distribute electricity down to thousandsif not millionsof customers. So it's

    何百万人とは言わないまでも、何千人もの顧客に電力を供給しているのです。つまり

  • a big, centralized system.

    中央集権的な大きなシステム

  • When you're sending a lot of power over just a few lines,

    たった数行で大量の電力を送るときに

  • that means that a tree falling on those power lines, or a storm can easily knock out power to a lot of people.

    つまり、木が送電線に落ちたり、嵐が来たりすると、多くの人が停電になるということです。

  • That's Umair Irfan. He writes about energy policy for Vox.com.

    ウマイール・イルファンです。Vox.comでエネルギー政策について書いています。

  • It's not just an inconvenience, it can affect the lives of thousands of people.

    不便なだけではなく、何千人もの人の生活に影響を与えることもあります。

  • We saw after Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, a blackout that lasted for months.

    プエルトリコのハリケーン・マリアの後に見た、何ヶ月も続いた停電。

  • And thousands of people died.

    そして何千人もの人が死んだ。

  • There are ways to avoid this, though.

    これを回避する方法もありますが。

  • Some homes have generators.

    発電機が付いている家もあります。

  • Some neighborhoods have their own solar panels.

    近所には太陽光パネルを設置しているところもあります。

  • And some places even have their own small power plants, like the New York University campus.

    また、ニューヨーク大学のキャンパスのように、小さな発電所を持っているところもあります。

  • During Hurricane Sandy in 2012, they were able to keep the campus liteven when

    2012年のハリケーン「サンディ」の際には、キャンパスの灯りを維持することができました。

  • most of downtown Manhattan went dark.

    マンハッタンのダウンタウンのほとんどが暗くなった。

  • These are all examples of a microgrid.

    これらはすべてマイクログリッドの例です。

  • A decentralized system that can sustain itself when it needs to.

    必要な時に必要なだけ持続できる分散型システム。

  • And the US government has invested in this technology.

    そして、アメリカ政府はこの技術に投資しています。

  • The military is very interested in microgrids. This is something they've invested in heavily

    軍はマイクログリッドに非常に興味を持っていますこれは彼らが多額の投資をしてきたものです

  • to power installationsboth in the United States and also in foreign areas where they

    米国内だけでなく、海外の地域でも電力設備に

  • may not have a reliable central power grid that they can count on.

    信頼できる中央電力網を持っていない可能性があります。

  • Another area is basically for remote, isolated communities

    もう一つのエリアは、基本的に遠隔地の孤立したコミュニティのためのものです。

  • that have a very fragile and tenuous link to the main power grid.

    主電源網に非常に脆弱で弱々しいリンクを持っています。

  • Microgrids are very useful during emergencies, especially blackouts.

    マイクログリッドは緊急時、特に停電時に非常に便利です。

  • But in an ideal world, we don't just use them for emergencies.

    しかし、理想的な世界では、緊急時に使うだけではありません。

  • They could restructure our current power system.

    彼らは現在の電力システムを再構築することができます。

  • If your goal is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, you want to try to minimize the amount of fossil

    温室効果ガスの排出量を削減することを目標とするならば、化石燃料の使用量を最小限に抑えようとしたいものです。

  • fuel you use and maximize the amount of free solar and wind energy you have.

    あなたが使用する燃料と、あなたが持っている無料の太陽エネルギーと風力エネルギーの量を最大化します。

  • Those can vary throughout the day.

    それらは一日の中で変化することができます。

  • And so you want to route power from where it's sunniest and windiest to the places that need it most.

    一番日当たりが良くて風が強い場所から、一番必要な場所に電力を送りたいのですね。

  • And that's where microgrids come in.

    そこでマイクログリッドの出番です。

  • Microgrids can generate power using green sources, like wind and solar. And unlike the

    マイクログリッドは、風力や太陽光などのグリーンソースを使って発電することができます。そして、これまでの

  • power plants, they can store that energy.

    発電所があれば、そのエネルギーを蓄えることができます。

  • When it's no longer sunny or windy,

    晴れても風が強くなくなってきたら

  • microgrids can jump in and say: “Hey! We have some power stored here!”

    マイクログリッドは 飛び込んで言うことができます"ここに電力を蓄えているんだ!"

  • And they can share their stored energy back up into the big grid.

    蓄積されたエネルギーを共有して、大きなグリッドに戻すことができます。

  • But...

    でも...

  • One big issue is that a lot of utilities are effectively monopolies and they're regulated by regulators

    大きな問題は、多くの公益事業が事実上の独占であり、規制当局によって規制されていることです。

  • that are trying to protect these old business models.

    こういった古いビジネスモデルを守ろうとしている人は

  • The reason microgrids present a threat to these companies isn't just that they help you survive a blackout.

    マイクログリッドがこれらの企業に脅威を与える理由は、ブラックアウトを乗り切るための手助けをしてくれるからだけではありません。

  • It's that it can also change the source of our power and the direction it flows in.

    それは、私たちの力の源や流れる方向を変えることもできるということです。

This is Larry. He's a squirrel.

こちらはラリーリスなんだ

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 Vox グリッド 電力 マイクロ 発電 エネルギー

信頼性の低い電力網をどうやって修復するか

  • 26 4
    林宜悉 に公開 2020 年 08 月 12 日
動画の中の単語