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  • Hey guys, I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking and welcome to this lesson on

  • adjective clauses and quantifiers, okay? Now if you want to know what an

  • adjective clause is you can check out any number of the lessons on

  • engvid.com that we have done in the past on this subject.

  • Today we are focusing on adjective clauses with quantifiers. Now

  • quantifiers are words that show a number, essentially. So here we have a

  • bunch of sentences a quantifier like "both", "one", "all". Okay, it can be

  • a number, "one", "two", "three", "four". It can be "a lot". It can be a

  • percentage, even.

  • So here we have, well we actually have six sentences, but let's say three

  • sets of sentences. And I want you to tell me how can you combine these two

  • sentences into one, okay? So we have the first sentence. It says, "Chris

  • has two sisters. Both of them smoke." Now if you know anything about

  • adjective clauses, you know that there are two types.

  • There can be identifying, non-identifying -- non-identifying means it's extra

  • information. One thing you should know about adjective clauses with

  • quantifiers: they are always going to be non-identifying, which means it's

  • always extra information. So this information about Chris's sisters -- "both

  • of them smoke" is non-essential information, okay?

  • Let's put this together though, so we can say, "Chris has two sisters",

  • and as you know with adjective clauses -- non-identifying -- you put a comma ", both

  • of"... now we have "them". Hmm, what do you know about adjective clauses?

  • You always use relative pronouns, right? So what are some relative

  • pronouns in adjective clauses? We have "who", "whom", "that", "which",

  • "whose", "where", "when".

  • In this situation, which one of those do you think we use? Okay, if you

  • said, "whom" you are absolutely correct.

  • Okay but you're saying, "Wait!

  • Alex, I learned that in adjective clauses we only use "whom" when the

  • subject is receiving an action."

  • In this situation, the sisters smoke. They're doing the action, it

  • should be "both of who smoke". Actually, in this situation, "whom". It

  • doesn't matter if it's subject, object, who's doing the action,

  • receiving the action -- you're always going to be using "whom" in the

  • quantifier.

  • Here we have "Nicki has two phones.

  • One of them is broken." So we can say,

  • "Nicki has two phones,

  • one of"... okay, we have "them", so what do you think?

  • "Which", "whom", "who", "that", "where", "when", "whose"? Okay as we know,

  • a phone is an object.

  • With objects you use "which". Now you're saying, "We can use 'which' or

  • 'that'." However, in adjective clauses with quantifiers, such as this, we

  • can't say, one of that is broken. We can only use "which" for objects.

  • Okay? So: "whom" for people, "which" for objects.

  • And finally we have "Tom's a writer. All of his books are popular." So

  • we're talking about Tom, but we're also talking about his books in the

  • second part of the sentence. So because we're talking about his books this

  • is a possessive, so with possessives we know that we use "whose".

  • "Tom's a writer, all of whose books are popular."

  • Okay, so what I have just shown you are the three relative pronouns that we

  • use with quantifiers and adjective clauses. And the only three you need to

  • know for this structure are "whom", "which", and "whose".

  • So, again, you can see the construction here, you have a quantifier: "both",

  • "one", "all". You always have "of", so "both of", "one of", "all of". And

  • then you have the relative pronoun, "both of whom", "one of which", "all of

  • whose". And again: "whom" for people, "which" for objects, "whose" for possessives.

  • And let me just show you one more little thing about this structure, and

  • then you guys can do the quiz.

  • Okay, so in the previous examples, you saw

  • the adjective clause with its quantifier in the second part of the

  • sentence. That is not the only possible position.As you can see in these

  • two sentences, it is also possible to put the adjective clause with the

  • quantifier, in the middle of the sentence.

  • So here we have, "J.K. Rowling, all of whose books are popular, is a great

  • writer." So we're saying J.K. Rowling is a great writer, and here you have

  • the quantifier. You're giving extra information about her. You're saying

  • all of her books are popular -- "all of whose books are popular, is a great writer."

  • In the second example, "The movie, most of which was boring, made me fall

  • asleep." So you're saying the movie made me fall asleep, and in the middle

  • part you're giving extra information, just like a regular adjective clause

  • and you're saying that, "most of which was boring". "Most of" what? The

  • movie, most of the movie was boring.

  • Okay guys, so just so you understand you can put the adjective clause with

  • the quantifier at the end of the sentence, in the second part. You can

  • also put it in the middle, after the subject that you're trying to

  • describe. In this case, J.K. Rowling, the author of Harry Potter, and here

  • you have the movie, whatever the movie was, all right?

  • Okay guys, if you want to test your knowledge of this, you can check out

  • the quiz on www.engvid.com. Good luck!

  • Learn English for free www.engvid.com

Hey guys, I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking and welcome to this lesson on

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A2 初級

上級英文法 - 形容詞節+量詞 (Advanced English Grammar - Adjective Clauses + Quantifiers)

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    Liling Lee Liling に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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