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  • - Hey, what's going on everybody?

  • You know what's really interesting about

  • what's happening in America right now

  • is that a lot of people don't seem to realize

  • how dominoes connect,

  • how one piece knocks another piece that knocks another piece

  • and in the end creates a giant wave.

  • Each story seems completely unrelated

  • and yet at the same time,

  • I feel like everything that happens in the world

  • connects to something else in some way, shape, or form.

  • And I think this news cycle that we witnessed

  • in the last week was a perfect example of that.

  • Amy Cooper, George Floyd, and the people of Minneapolis.

  • Amy Cooper was, for many people I think, the catalyst,

  • and by the way I should mention that all of this is like

  • against the backdrop of coronavirus, you know?

  • People stuck in their houses for one of

  • the longest periods we can remember,

  • people losing more jobs than anyone can ever remember.

  • People struggling to make do

  • more than they can ever remember,

  • and I think all of that compounded by the fact

  • that there seems to be no genuine plan from leadership.

  • Like, no one knows what's gonna happen.

  • You know, no one knows how long they're supposed to be good,

  • how long they're supposed to stay inside,

  • how long they supposed to flatten the curve.

  • No one knows any of these things.

  • And so what happens is you have

  • a group of people who are stuck inside,

  • all of us, our society, we're stuck inside.

  • And we then start to consume,

  • we see what's happening in the world

  • and I think Amy Cooper was one of the first

  • moments that, you know, one of the first dominoes

  • that we saw get knocked down post-corona for many people.

  • And that was a world where you quickly realized that,

  • while everyone is facing the battle against coronavirus,

  • black people in America are still facing

  • the battle against racism and coronavirus.

  • And the reason I say it's a domino is because,

  • think about how many black Americans just

  • have read and seen the news of how black people

  • are disproportionately affected by coronavirus,

  • and not because of something inherently inside black people,

  • but rather because

  • of

  • the lives black people have lived in America for so long.

  • You know, coronavirus exposed all of it.

  • And now here you have this woman who,

  • we've all seen the video now.

  • Blatantly,

  • blatantly knew how to use the power of,

  • of her whiteness to threaten the life

  • of another man and his blackness.

  • What we saw with her was a really, really powerful,

  • explicit example of an understanding of racism

  • in a structural way.

  • When she looked, when she looked at that man,

  • when she looked at Cooper and she said to him,

  • "I'm gonna call 911 and I'm gonna tell them

  • "there's an African-American man threatening my life."

  • She knew how powerful that was.

  • And that in itself is telling, you know?

  • It tells you how she perceives the police.

  • It tells you how she perceives her perception

  • or her relationship with the police as a white woman.

  • It shows you how she perceives

  • a black man's relationship with the police

  • and the police's relationship with him.

  • It's, it was, it was really, it was, it was,

  • it was powerful.

  • 'Cause so many people act like they don't know what,

  • what black Americans are talking about when they say it,

  • and yet Amy Cooper had a distinct understanding.

  • She was like, "Oh, I know.

  • "I know that you're afraid of interacting with the police,

  • "because there is a presumption of your guilt

  • "because of your blackness.

  • "I know that, as a white woman,

  • "I can weaponize this tool against you,

  • "and I know that by the time we've sifted through

  • "who was right or wrong,

  • "there's a good chance that you will have lost

  • "in some way, shape, or form."

  • And so, for me, that was the first domino.

  • And so now you're living in a world

  • where so many people are watching this video.

  • So many people are being triggered,

  • because in many ways it was like a, it was like a gotcha.

  • You know?

  • It was like a, it was like the curtain had been pulled back,

  • aha, so you do this.

  • 'Cause it's always been spoken about, but this was like,

  • it was powerful to see it being used.

  • And I think a lot of people were triggered by that,

  • a lot of people were like, "Damn.

  • "We knew it was real, but this is like real, real."

  • You know?

  • I think a lot of people were so angry that

  • some of the outrage that came to her was because of her dog.

  • And I mean, I get it, you know?

  • But it was, it was,

  • a lot of people felt like,

  • a lot of people felt like it would have been great

  • if the dog shelters had the same, I guess, power

  • or if police departments were run by the people

  • who run dog shelters because they seem to act like this,

  • they didn't waste time.

  • They were like, "Nope, we'd like our dog back, lady."

  • Which, I'm gonna be honest, I think was, that's was a,

  • that was a, I mean, that was a hell of a punishment.

  • Her job is one thing, taking a white lady's dog.

  • That was a nice dog.

  • Yeah, so that was the first domino, you know?

  • It was the first domino where

  • I felt like you could feel something stirring.

  • And all of this, again, is in the backdrop, backdrop.

  • It's, it's coronavirus has happened.

  • The numbers have come out.

  • You know, the story of Ahmad Aubery in Georgia,

  • that story has come up, all of these things are happening.

  • And then the video of George Floyd comes out,

  • and I don't know what made that video more painful

  • for people to watch, the fact that

  • that man was having his life taken in front of our eyes,

  • the fact that we were watching someone being murdered

  • by someone whose job is to protect and serve,

  • or the fact that he seemed so calm doing it, you know?

  • Oftentimes we're always told

  • that police feared for their life,

  • it was like a threatened, and you know what?

  • You always feel like an asshole when, when you're like,

  • "You didn't fear for your life.

  • "How, why did you fear for your life?

  • "How did you fear?"

  • But now more and more we're starting to see that it's like,

  • no, it doesn't seem like there's a fear,

  • it just seems like it's, you can do it so you did it.

  • There was a black man on the ground in handcuffs,

  • and you, you could take his life, so you did.

  • Almost knowing that there would be no ramifications.

  • And then again, everyone on the internet has to watch this,

  • everyone sees it, it floods our timelines as people.

  • And,

  • and I think,

  • one ray of sunshine for me in that moment

  • was seeing how many people

  • instantly condemned what they saw.

  • You know?

  • And maybe it's because I'm an optimistic person,

  • but I don't think I've ever seen anything like that.

  • Especially not in America,

  • I haven't seen a police video come out

  • and just see across the board.

  • I mean, even Fox News commentators and,

  • and police chiefs from around the country

  • immediately condemning what they saw.

  • No questions, not what was he doing, not just going, no,

  • this, what happened here was wrong.

  • It was wrong.

  • This person got murdered on camera.

  • And then the police were fired, great.

  • But I, I think what people take for granted is, is,

  • is how much, for so many people,

  • that feels like nothing, you know?

  • How many of us, as human beings,

  • can take the life of another human being

  • and then have firing be the worst thing that happens to us?

  • And yes, we don't know where the case will go,

  • don't get me wrong, but it just, it's,

  • it feels like there is no moment of justice,

  • there is no, you know, if you're watching a movie,

  • you at least want the cops,

  • you'd want to see the perpetrators in handcuffs.

  • You want to see the perpetrators

  • facing some sort of justice.

  • Yes, they might come out on bail, et cetera,

  • but I think there's a lot of catharsis that comes with

  • seeing that justice being doled out.

  • When the riots happened,

  • that for me was an interesting culmination of everything.

  • I saw so many people online saying,

  • "These riots are disgusting,

  • "this is not how a society should be run.

  • "You do not loot and you do not burn and you do not,

  • "this is not how our society is built."

  • And that actually triggered something in me

  • where I was like, man, okay.

  • Society, but what is society?

  • And fundamentally, when you boil it down,

  • society is a contract.

  • It's a contract that we sign as human beings

  • amongst each other.

  • We sign a contract with each other as people

  • whether it's spoken or unspoken and we say,

  • "Amongst this group of us, we agree in common rules,

  • "common ideals and common practices

  • "that are going to define us as a group."

  • That's what I think a society is, it's a contract.

  • And, as with most contracts, the contract is only as strong

  • as the people who are abiding by it.

  • But if you think of being a black person in America

  • who is living in Minneapolis or Minnesota

  • or any place where you're not having a good time,

  • ask yourself this question when you watch those people:

  • What vested interest do they have

  • in maintaining the contract?

  • Why, like, why don't we all loot?

  • Why, why don't, why doesn't everybody take,

  • why doesn't, because we've agreed on things.

  • There are so many people who are starving out there,

  • there are so many people who don't have,

  • there's so many people.

  • There are people who are destitute,

  • there are people who, when the virus hit,

  • and they don't have a second paycheck, are already broke,

  • which is insane, but that's the reality.

  • But still, think about how many people

  • who don't have, the have-nots.

  • Say, "You know what?

  • "I'm still gonna play by the rules,

  • "even though I have nothing

  • "because I still wish for the society to work and exist."

  • And then, some members of that society,

  • namely black American people, watch time and time again

  • how the contract that they have signed with society

  • is not being honored by the society

  • that has forced them to sign it with them.

  • When you watch Ahmad Aubery being shot

  • and you hear that those men have been released

  • and, were it not for the video and the outrage,

  • those people would be living their lives,

  • what part of the contract is that in society?

  • When you see George Floyd on the ground

  • and you see a man losing his life

  • in a way that no person should ever have to lose their life

  • at the hands of someone who is supposed to enforce the law,

  • what part of the contract is that?

  • And a lot of people say, well, what good does this do?

  • Yeah, but what good doesn't it do?

  • That's the question people don't ask the other way around.

  • What good does it do to loot Target?

  • What does it, how does it help you to loot Target?

  • Yeah, but how does it help you to not loot Target?

  • Answer that question.

  • Because the only reason you didn't loot Target before

  • was because you were upholding society's contract.

  • There is no contract if law and people in power

  • don't uphold their end of it.

  • And that's the thing I think

  • people don't understand sometimes is that,