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  • [classy computer repair music]

  • Greetings and welcome to an LGR thing

  • about this lovely thing [chuckles at impending tasks]

  • It needs a little work.

  • Hopefully we'll be addressing this stuff.

  • This is the IBM Personal Computer XT Model 286,

  • otherwise known as the 5162.

  • I don't know if it's working, I've had it for a while now

  • I need to see if it works.

  • And it needs some restoration, that much is clear,

  • whether or not it's functional.

  • Hopefully this will be pretty interesting.

  • I've talked about IBM PCs and XTs and ATs

  • and different 286s but never a PC XT 286.

  • In case you're not aware, this is a system

  • that IBM introduced in late 1986 as a kind of

  • not really a stopgap, it -- so this is the weird thing.

  • It's a 286, and it came out after the IBM AT did.

  • And it was only on the market for a year or two

  • right before the IBM PS/2 line came around

  • and the IBM AT was discontinued.

  • So I've always wanted one,

  • but they are incredibly rare, apparently.

  • They're certainly valuable.

  • The value keeps shooting up over the past

  • however many years I had been looking for one, but yeah.

  • It's a lot like an IBM AT, except it's in a PC XT case.

  • And in fact, in some situations that apparently

  • could outperform the PC AT 286

  • at least the earlier ones.

  • So I might like to try and put that to the test

  • if we can get one of these working.

  • And yes, I did say one of these because...

  • I have two of them. Augh. [laughing]

  • So, thanks to Jonathan and Wesley for sending these

  • in my way a good while ago now.

  • I've just kind of had them sitting here

  • waiting to be restored.

  • I just, who knows!

  • Who knows what's going on inside at all.

  • In fact, let me turn these around.

  • All right, so as you can see this one internally,

  • at least from the rust and the battery leakage going on,

  • that is in a little rougher shape,

  • they both need some serious cleaning up though,

  • at the very least.

  • And again, functionally, there's no telling.

  • So that's what I'm going to try to do here today

  • is try to get them working,

  • or at the very least get one of them working.

  • Maybe sort of Frankenstein the two together if need be.

  • Ideally, I'd like to get them both working, of course,

  • because they are rare machines.

  • So yeah, and we'll just, we'll see.

  • IBM 5162, and they both have the badge.

  • In fact, this one still has the plastic on it, that's nice.

  • They were manufactured in Armonk, New York,

  • at least these were. A lot of them were actually

  • manufactured in Scotland, my IBM AT over there was.

  • It's got a power supply in here that is a little beefier

  • than were some of the earlier PCs because support hard disks

  • and more expansion cards and such.

  • And then these battery bays, these are interesting in fact,

  • let me just go and open them up.

  • This one I'm especially worried about 'cause it looks like

  • it has leaked and ruined a bunch of things.

  • I believe these are six volt lithium of some kind,

  • probably the sa-- yeah.

  • It's like the same ones that you get on a PS/2.

  • The IBM PS/2 has used the exact same type for

  • the battery backup of the settings

  • and the clock, and all that kind of stuff.

  • Now for the top one.

  • Well, that screw does not wanna budge, it's moving.

  • Yikes.

  • Well, we'll just put that back

  • and we'll get back to that later.

  • Anyway, yes, so we have the I/O section over here

  • with eight expansion cards each, or slots for the cards.

  • I think they're mostly 16 bit, actually maybe 8 bit.

  • I don't exactly remember right now, but yeah.

  • There's also the keyboard connector,

  • which I don't think is restricted

  • to the PC XT style of keyboard.

  • I think you can plug in like a five pin AT keyboard

  • here and it'll work just fine.

  • Like I said, it's just a strange hybrid of the AT and XT.

  • But yeah, the actual cards that are installed, I don't know.

  • I mean, obviously, we've got parallel and serial cards,

  • and there's a modem of some kind here.

  • This is probably a hard disk card or maybe a controller,

  • floppy, whatever.

  • Got a game port, it looks like down here,

  • and probably a floppy and hard disk controller card

  • from one of these.

  • This looks like CGA 'cause it's got the nine pin video

  • right there, and a d-sub connector and then composite.

  • And then up here it looks like a VGA connector.

  • So we got 15 pins right there.

  • So it'll be intriguing to see what's inside and of course,

  • what survived with all this nastiness going on.

  • But lets open them up, and see what we find.

  • [jazz music fades out]

  • Alrighty!

  • We're gonna start off with

  • the nastier of the two,

  • the one with the rust and battery leakage around back.

  • Neither one of these systems have all the screws around back

  • they're supposed to be five, they each only have three.

  • It's a little bent.

  • There we go.

  • Let's see what the damage is.

  • It's not great, but could be worse honestly.

  • Actually the motherboard itself

  • doesn't look terribly damaged.

  • The battery did however, leak onto the keyboard connector

  • and into the power cable connectors from the power supply.

  • The other thing I'm concerned about

  • are the tantalum capacitors,

  • see these little round yellow dudes in there?

  • They tend to... blow up. [nervous chuckle]

  • I'm just gonna be careful

  • whenever we do end up powering it on.

  • I mean, obviously, the ideal thing would be

  • to just replace them immediately,

  • but I don't have any replacements right now.

  • Yeah, they're one of those things where

  • you just, you can't tell if they're gonna be okay

  • or not just by looking at them.

  • Anyway, let's check out the cards

  • and things that are in here

  • since we can actually see precisely what we got now.

  • So first up, we do have quite a beefy hard drive,

  • not in capacity obviously, it's only 20 Megs

  • but pretty standard for AT class machines,

  • a type two, classic.

  • We have two different disk drives.

  • Looks like the top one is the standard 1.2 meg

  • five and a quarter inch

  • that they came with, by default, with the one below it...

  • Forgot to look at these earlier.

  • But yeah, you see this one with a little asterisk.

  • That usually means -- in fact I think it does for sure,

  • it means it is a 360K. In terms of the expansion cards,

  • in this one we've got all these are 16 bit ones here

  • and there's one eight bit one.

  • Looks like that is the video card

  • but, this is the pretty much standard

  • IBM floppy and hard disk controller here.

  • We have a serial and parallel card

  • of some kind installed here.

  • This is a modem, and we have a Hardcard.

  • Plus Hardcard XL 2105 it looks like,

  • I've never run across one of those that actually works

  • but that would be nice.

  • And then of course lastly is the graphics

  • and we'll see what that is.

  • Let me just take some of these out,

  • I wanna see what they are.

  • Alright, so here is the modem.

  • Practical Peripherals.

  • Made in USA, copyright 1991.

  • I like the speaker that has on there.

  • Probably like a 2400 bps, I don't know.

  • Yeah, check out that Plus Development Corporation Hardcard.

  • I've got, I think three of these now and none of them work.

  • Look at this little Cirrus Logic VGA card,

  • Got a CL-GD5401 chipset on there.

  • I'm not too familiar with that one,

  • but seems like a basic little card.

  • Bet it would do the job just fine.

  • Let's open up the other one, see what's inside that.

  • Oh, this one just has the 1.2 meg.

  • Let's see here we've got the hard disk, which is,

  • I don't know, it doesn't have any markings.

  • It's definitely a Seagate, ah! It is a ST-4038, wonderful.

  • As for the cards, yeah, that is definitely CGA card there.

  • One of the older ones with the amber brown kind of PCB.

  • The hard disk and floppy disk controller

  • looks like it's probably the same one as the other one.

  • In fact, this too the serial parallel seems to be the same.

  • This on the other hand, there's not much going on there.

  • It is just a straight up Analog Input Card as it puts it,

  • just a 15 pin game port, for plugging in joysticks and such,

  • no branding or anything.

  • A lot of these were made by Kraft.

  • This is just a generic looking part.

  • Let's check out the CGA card.

  • Yeah, I really like the way that these look.

  • I've got a couple others of these, IBM ones man.

  • They looked really cool, look at that brown dark orange

  • Copyright 1981, I believe I'm gonna use that for testing

  • the display and such just 'cause I have an IBM 5154

  • enhanced color display over here that'll work for CGA

  • and EGA so that'll be nice.

  • It is honestly looking pretty clean, all things considered.

  • I mean, it still needs to get cleaning but you know,

  • considering it hasn't been cleaned yet that's not bad

  • at the 286 down there and we have some...

  • This is gonna be a thing I don't know.

  • I've heard the RAM and these can be a little iffy

  • 'cause I think you've got 128k

  • of just these little socketed doohickeys down here

  • and then you have these two modules that add another 512k

  • taking it to a total of 640k of system memory.

  • You take out these cards here

  • because we just really only need are the graphics

  • and the floppy and hard disk controller.

  • No sense and mucking up the troubleshooting period.

  • Alright if you're worried about my desktop surface here,

  • Don't be, I always get comments about that.

  • "Oh, you're sliding around scratching it up!"

  • It's just a vinyl laminate.

  • I'm gonna go ahead and put a new battery in here.

  • Hopefully if it boots up we'll be able to,

  • get into the software and save some settings

  • and whatnot with that though.

  • Can I get this plugged in

  • and just see what happens.

  • [chill reassembly beats]

  • After I've plugged in, let's power it on or try to.

  • [computer loudly whirs to life]

  • Well that's [laughing] about as good as I can hope.

  • 640K ram, okay.

  • We got the 161 error

  • which just means we need to run the setup program.

  • Otherwise we can run basic, looks like it's running

  • in 40 column mode as well, intriguingly.

  • Hey, so we're gonna need a DOS,

  • we're gonna go with version 3.3.

  • Assuming the floppy drive works,

  • I don't have it cleaned or anything, really just want to see

  • if this was worth cleaning first.

  • Looks like it probably will be, it's trying to load.

  • All right.

  • Gonna give GSETUP a shot here.

  • This is one of those computers

  • where you can't just enter the BIOS on its own.

  • You have to have some software.

  • It does not like the 40 column mode.

  • Okay, well, let's try to put it on color 80 columns.

  • Okay rebooting, that looks better already.

  • We're able to actually see what we're doing now.

  • So let's see, get the time going.

  • Hey Flerblenerp, what time is it?

  • - [Flerblenerp] It's 11:08

  • - Oh jeez.

  • [computer beeping]

  • What day is it?

  • - [Flerblenerp] It's Sunday, April 26 2020.

  • - I honestly didn't know.

  • Yay, Y2K compliance.

  • So disk drive A, double sided high density 1.2.

  • I have 640K base memory.