Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • [music]

    [音楽]

  • [applause]

    [拍手]

  • Genevieve Bell: What a pleasure to be here and what fun to get to talk about boredom

    ジュヌヴィエーヴ・ベルここに来て、退屈について話すことができるのは何が楽しいのでしょうか?

  • in a place where one hopes there won't be a great deal. I was thinking about what it

    大したことはないだろうと思っているところに何を考えていたかというと

  • was I wanted to talk about today and struck by what it is that I think TED brings to bear

    は、私が今日話したいと思っていたと私はTEDがもたらすと思うことが何であるかによって打たれました。

  • and why it is that it's such an exciting thing to participate in. But I was also really struck

    それがなぜこんなにもエキサイティングなものなのか、それが参加してみたいと思ったのです。しかし、私はまた、本当に心を打たれました。

  • by the fact that one of the things that we never do in events like this is actually have

    このようなイベントでは絶対にしないことの一つが、実際には

  • any downtime.

    どんなダウンタイムでも

  • So what I wanted to do today instead was actually make you an offer about what I hope you do

    だから今日は、代わりに私がしたかったことは、実際にあなたにしてほしいことを提案することでした。

  • when you leave here today, which is to have a brief moment of being bored. I'm really

    今日ここを出るときは退屈している時間が短いということです。私は本当に

  • struck by the work I do about the fact that there is so much technology in our lives,

    私たちの生活の中にこれほど多くのテクノロジーがあるという事実についての仕事に心を打たれました。

  • a promise of constant connectivity, a promise of devices and experiences, and with all of

    常につながることを約束し、デバイスと体験を約束し、すべてのものを使って

  • that comes the fact that none of us ever switch off, log off or spend down time anymore.

    それは、私たちの誰もがもうスイッチを切ったり、ログオフしたり、ダウンタイムを過ごすことがないという事実に由来しています。

  • I've been thinking about what the perils of that are, and why it is we might need to be

    私は、その危険性が何であるかを考えてきました。

  • bored, and what it might bring to bring a little bit of boredom back into our lives.

    退屈していて、それは私たちの生活に少しの退屈をもたらすかもしれないもの。

  • It did strike me that I should probably say who it was that I was to tell you that boredom

    それは私を襲った 私はおそらくそれが誰だったのかを言うべきだと思いました 退屈さをあなたに伝えるために

  • was important. I am indeed Australian, trained in the United States. I'm also the daughter

    が重要でした。私は確かにオーストラリア人で アメリカで訓練を受けました私はまた、娘の

  • of an anthropologist, so I spent most of my childhood knocking around Central and Northern

    私は人類学者であるため、幼少期のほとんどを 中部と北部を歩き回っていました。

  • Australia killing things for my supper.

    オーストラリアは私の夕食のために物を殺しています。

  • In the context of boredom, you should think that this either means I've led a charmed

    退屈の文脈では、これはどちらかの意味であると考えるべきであることを意味します。

  • existence where I was never bored, or perhaps more likely, I've been bored in a great many

    飽きの来ない存在、というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか、飽きの来ない存在というか

  • places in this world.

    この世界のどこかに

  • In my job at Intel, I think of my task as bringing people into a conversation about

    インテルでの仕事では、私の仕事は、人々を次のことについての会話に引き込むことだと考えています。

  • technology, whether that means I spend my time in people's houses all over the world

    技術的には、世界中の人の家で過ごしているかどうかは別にして

  • talking to them, getting a sense about what makes them tick, what they care about, what's

    彼らと話をして、何が彼らの心を動かすのか、何に関心を持っているのか、何が大事なのか、何が大事なのかを知ることができます。

  • important to them and then feeding that information back into the company. That means I spend

    その情報を会社にフィードバックしています。つまり、私は

  • a lot of time talking to engineers and trying to get them to understand what life is like

    エンジニアに人生を理解してもらおうと、多くの時間をかけて話をしています。

  • outside the building.

    建物の外で

  • And about two years ago, the engineers with whom I work said, "OK, Genevieve, we get it,

    そして2年ほど前に、私が働いているエンジニアたちは、"OK、Genevieve、私たちはそれを理解しています。

  • this whole real people thing. We're really on board." And here they are. [laughter]

    この全体の本当の人々のこと。We're really on board." And here they are.[笑]

  • And I looked at this image and I thought, "Who are the people that you think you've

    そして、私はこの画像を見て、私は思った、"あなたが考えている人々は誰ですか?

  • found?" If you're in the real world, which many of us are, I'm willing to bet you don't

    見つかりましたか?

  • have small children and white furniture, just practically speaking. It's unclear looking

    小さな子供がいて、白い家具を持っているだけで、実質的には。それは不明確な見

  • at this image what it is that George Bush Sr. is doing making print ads. Global financial

    ジョージ・ブッシュ・シニアが印刷広告を作っているのは何なのか、この画像を見てみましょう。世界的な金融

  • crisis much worse in America then they're letting on.

    アメリカの危機ははるかに悪化しているし、彼らはそれをさせている。

  • There's something about the profound like of clutter in this room that suggests this

    この部屋の乱雑さの深遠なような何かが、このことを示唆している。

  • is deeply unreal. There is, for me, as a social scientist, some nagging worry about where

    深く非現実的です。社会科学者である私にとっては、どこで

  • on the planet you find three generations of white people enjoying the same content happily.

    この地球上では、白人の三世代が同じコンテンツを楽しんでいるのを見つけることができます。

  • [laughter]

    [笑]

  • Normally when I'm speaking to American audience I suggest that means they're found Canadians.

    通常、私はアメリカの聴衆に話しているとき、私は彼らが発見されたカナダ人を意味することを示唆しています。

  • Perhaps in this context, we'd say Kiwis. Oh, I know. Not nice. Bad.

    おそらくこの文脈では、我々はキーウィーと言うだろう。ああ、そうだね。不愉快だな。悪い。

  • And then as one of the engineers did actually point out to me as I started critiquing this

    そして、エンジニアの一人が実際に私に指摘してくれたように、私はこれを批評し始めました。

  • image for him, in what universe does she get the remote control? And I remember looking

    リモコンを手に入れるのは 一体どういう世界なんだ?そして、私は覚えています

  • at this image and thinking you have not only found the wrong people, but this is such a

    この画像を見て、あなたは間違った人を見つけただけではなく、このような

  • seductive image if you're an engineer or a technology developer because it suggests there

    魅惑的なイメージは、それがあることを示唆しているので、あなたがエンジニアや技術開発者であれば

  • are people sitting around happily waiting for you to bring stuff to you.

    は、あなたが物を持ってくるのを喜んで座って待っている人たちです。

  • And so we came back and said, "Listen, mate, this is really what the world looks like."

    そして、私たちは戻ってきて言った、"聞いて、仲間、これは本当に世界がどのように見えるかです。

  • [laughter] It is some schlub on a fake leather sofa in an apartment in Hong Kong where there

    香港のアパートにある偽物の革張りのソファに座っているのは、どこかのアホだ。

  • is so much stuff in this room, it is amazing to think how you could produce anything else

    この部屋にはこれだけのものがあるのに、それ以外のものをどうやって作り出すのかと思うと驚きです。

  • that would break through the noise. There are seven remote controls here. There is an

    雑音を打ち破るためにここには7つのリモコンがありますここには

  • automatic foot massage machine, an air conditioner, a fax and photocopying machine, one television,

    自動足裏マッサージ機、エアコン、FAX・コピー機、テレビ1台。

  • two VCRs, a DVD player and enough content this bloke is never going to need to leave

    2台のビデオデッキとDVDプレーヤーと十分なコンテンツを持っていて、彼は決して離れる必要はないだろう

  • his room again.

    彼の部屋に戻った

  • But this is also a room in which one could be bored. And for me, it turns out boredom

    しかし、ここは人が退屈する可能性のある部屋でもあります。そして、私にとっては、退屈であることが判明しました。

  • is a really important thing, because when you spend time with real people, they're not

    は本当に大切なことなんです。

  • always constantly happily sitting on sofas all enjoying the same content blissfully in

    ソファーに座ってはしゃいではしゃいではしゃいではしゃいではしゃいではしゃいではしゃいではしゃいではしゃいではしゃいではしゃぎまわる

  • their white clean pristine rooms. They're actually living lives where there's a whole

    真っ白で清潔な部屋に住んでいます。彼らは実際に生活をしています。

  • lot of other things going on.

    他にも色々あって

  • So part of my job then is not only to tell the stories about real people, but to actually

    私の仕事の一部は、実在の人物の話をするだけではなく、実際に

  • think about what our relationships are with, through, and around new technologies. And

    新しい技術との関係を考えてみてください。ということを考えてみてはいかがでしょうか。

  • one of the things I'm really struck by, and I was particularly struck by watching David

    私が本当に心を打たれたことの一つであり、特にデビッドを見て心を打たれたことの一つです。

  • earlier as he held his mobile phone in his hand, is that mobile phones aren't really

    以前、彼は彼の手で彼の携帯電話を開催したように、携帯電話は本当にないということです。

  • about communication anymore. It's not a device for making phone calls.

    もはやコミュニケーションの話ではありません。電話をかけるための装置ではありません。

  • The soul, in some ways, purpose of every mobile device all of you have somewhere in your hands

    魂は、いくつかの方法で、あなたの手のどこかに持っているすべてのモバイルデバイスのすべての目的

  • or your pockets is the promise that you'll never be bored again. You'll never have to

    またはあなたのポケットは、あなたが再び退屈することはありませんという約束です。あなたは決して

  • be anywhere without something to do, without a game, a map, an ability to text someone

    暇を持て余す

  • and say, "Where are you and what are you doing?"

    と言うと、"あなたはどこにいて、あなたは何をしているのですか?

  • And that is an extraordinary promise because it erases some really interesting things,

    そして、それは本当に面白いものを消してしまうので、とんでもないお約束です。

  • and it got me thinking about boredom and the nature of boredom. And it turns out boredom's

    退屈と退屈の本質について考えさせられましたそして、それは退屈の本質が

  • actually really interesting. How ironic is that?

    実は本当に面白いんですなんて皮肉なんだ?

  • Really interesting, but also comparatively new. Boredom as a word doesn't actually enter

    本当に面白いが、比較的新しい。言葉としての退屈は、実際には入力しません。

  • the English language until 1852 in a kind of irony of all ironies, boredom enters the

    すべての皮肉の一種で1852年までの英語の言語は、退屈が入ります。

  • English language in Dickens in the book "Bleak House." Does it get anymore ironic than that?

    本の中のディケンズの英語の言語 " Bleak House." Does it get anymore ironic than that?

  • Where the protagonist, as many of you will remember, a woman who is at the kind of beginning

    主人公は、あなたの多くが覚えているように、開始の種類にある女性がどこに

  • edge of the industrial age. She doesn't have to work. She is of the leisure class, and

    産業時代の端っこ。彼女は働く必要はありません。彼女は余暇階級であり

  • she spends this entire book basically complaining about the fact that she's bored.

    彼女は基本的に彼女が退屈しているという事実について不平を言ってこの本全体を費やしています。

  • She has too many choices, too many things to do. It's all a little bit overwhelming

    選択肢が多すぎて やることが多すぎてそれはすべてが少し圧倒されています

  • and there's this really interesting sense of the linking of the notion of boredom to

    退屈という概念とリンクしているという、本当に面白い感覚があります。

  • the notion of choice and the fact that the word boredom doesn't come into the English

    選択の概念と退屈という言葉が英語に入ってこないという事実

  • language until the Industrial Revolution tells you something about what it is that boredom

    産業革命までの言葉は退屈を物語っている

  • is linked to.

    がリンクしています。

  • Because frankly, before the Industrial Revolution, you didn't have the opportunity to be bored.

    なぜなら、率直に言って、産業革命の前には、退屈する機会がなかったからです。

  • You were merely idle. And idle and boredom are two very different things.

    あなたはただの怠け者だった怠けていたことと退屈していたことは全く違うものだ

  • As boredom arrives in English, it very quickly gets links to things like a morality that

    退屈が英語に来ると、それは非常にすぐに道徳のようなものとリンクします。

  • says being bored is bad and not something you should admit to. We promptly then go a

    退屈していることは悪いことであり、認めるべきことではないと言います。私たちはすぐに

  • whole set of theorizing of boredom and starting to think about how you define it.

    退屈を理論化して、それをどのように定義するかを考え始める。

  • Here's just a list of some of the words that get used to think about boredom. It's a lot.

    ここでは、退屈について考えるときに使われる言葉をいくつか挙げてみました。多いですね。

  • What's interesting if you go through all of the different sorts of academic literature--philosophy,

    哲学という様々な種類の学術文献を調べてみると面白いですね。

  • sociology, psychology--all of them turn on a couple of things here. One is that boredom

    社会学、心理学...それらのすべてが ここでは いくつかのことに影響を与えている一つは退屈だということ

  • is clearly a state of tedium, a repetitious set of activities, a moment of being disengaged

    はっきり言って退屈な状態であり、活動の繰り返しである。

  • by one's surroundings.

    周りの環境によって。

  • What's fascinating, however, is that moment of disengagement actually your brain lights

    What's fascinating, however, that moment of disengagement actually your brain lights.

  • up. We may think of being bored as being a time of your brain being completely inactive.

    をアップします。退屈しているというのは、脳が完全に活動していない時だと考えるかもしれません。

  • It turns out one's brain is almost as active when bored as when not bored. And it turns

    それは1'sの脳は、退屈していないときと同様に退屈したときにほぼ同じくらいアクティブであることが判明した。そして、それは

  • out the pieces of one's brain that light up when you're bored are very different than

    退屈しているときに点灯する脳の一部を取り出すことは

  • the ones that light up when you're engaged.

    婚約している時に点灯するやつだ

  • It turns out from both a psychological and a physical perspective being bored is actually

    それは退屈している心理的および物理的な観点の両方から判明した実際には

  • a moment where your brain gets to reset itself and where, to take David's point, your consciousness

    あなたの脳が自分自身をリセットするために取得し、どこで、デビッドのポイントを取るために、あなたの意識を取得する瞬間

  • gets to reset itself, too.

    は自分自身もリセットされます。

  • Interesting, right? Very different notion about what bored might be then. So if we were

    面白いだろ?退屈とは何かということについては全く違う考え方だなもし私たちが

  • to go looking for boredom, where might we find it?

    退屈さを探しに行くには、どこでそれを見つけることができますか?

  • Unfortunately for me, talking about boredom meant I had to go read Heidegger. It's a bit

    私にとっては残念ながら、退屈といえばハイデガーを読みに行かなければならないことを意味していた。それはちょっと

  • like having to read Dickens. Heidegger is a man who deeply obsessed with boredom in

    ディケンズを読まなければならないようなハイデッガーは、退屈に深く執着した人物である。

  • the 1920s, theorizes it, has this lovely passage here about sitting in a railway station basically

    1920年代に、それを理論化した、この素敵な一節は、基本的には駅に座っていることについての

  • bored out of his skull.

    彼の頭蓋骨の外に退屈している。

  • I won't read this for you, but suffice it to say in reading it, this should suddenly

    私はあなたのためにこれを読むことはありませんが、それを読んで言うには十分ですが、これは突然必要があります。

  • feel really familiar. Without wanting to get overly nostalgic, this is the boredom of all

    とっても身近に感じる懐かしさを過剰に求めずに、これがすべての退屈な

  • of our childhoods. This is the boredom of being kicked out of the back door by your

    子供の頃のに裏口から追い出される退屈さです。

  • mother every summer and told to come home when it gets dark.

    毎年夏になると母親に「暗くなったら帰って来い」と言われます。

  • And when the exchange would go, "Mom, I'm bored," and your mother will say, "You could

    そして、交換が行くだろうときに、"ママ、私は退屈だ、"とあなたのお母さんは言うでしょう、"あなたができる

  • go mow the lawn then." And the response is, "I'm not that bored," and off we went and

    go mow lawn then." and response is, "I'm not that bored, " and off we went and

  • found things to do.

    することを見つけました。

  • And many of us spent out childhoods knocking around backyards and creek beds and ovals

    そして、私たちの多くは、裏庭や小川のベッドやオーバルの周りをノックして子供時代を過ごしました。

  • and generally not necessarily being delinquents or setting fire to rabbit hatches, but certainly

    非行に走ったり ウサギに火をつけたりするわけではありませんが

  • engaging in a set of fairly unstructured activities.

    かなり構造化されていない活動に従事しています。

  • Mostly we don't do boredom the same way as adults, and I think frankly we probably don't

    ほとんどの場合、私たちは大人と同じように退屈をしないでください、と私は率直に言って、私たちはおそらくしないと思います。

  • let many of our children have boredom the way we once had it.

    多くの子供たちに、かつてのような退屈な思いをさせてしまった。

  • Interestingly for philosophers, and particularly for Heidegger, he argues that being bored

    哲学者、特にハイデガーにとって興味深いことに、彼は退屈であることを主張しています。

  • is actually a fundamental state of being a human being, and that in fact we should spend

    は、実は人間としての基本的な状態であり、実際には

  • less of our time forestalling boredom and trying to take it away and more of our time

    暇つぶしに時間を取られず、暇つぶしに時間を取られず

  • actively waking it up.

    積極的に起こします。

  • So thinking about how it is we might embrace boredom then is a really interesting challenge,

    だから、私たちが退屈を受け入れることができるかどうかを考えることは、本当に興味深い挑戦です。

  • because we have some problems here, right? Heidegger could be bored on a train platform

    ここに問題があるからでしょ?ハイデガーは電車のホームで退屈していたかもしれません

  • in 1929. It's pretty hard to be bored on a train platform in 2011. It's hard to be bored

    1929年のことです。2011年の電車のホームで退屈するのはかなり難しいです。退屈するのは難しいです。

  • in an airport. It's hard to be bored almost anywhere.

    空港でどこにいても退屈するのは難しいですね

  • Because in the nearly 100 years that have passed since Heidegger was first writing about

    というのも、ハイデガーが最初に書いてから100年近く経っている間に

  • boredom, we have introduced a whole lot of devices that prevent us from ever being bored.

    退屈は、私たちが決して退屈しないようにするための工夫をたくさん紹介してきましたが、その中には、私たちが退屈しないようにするための工夫がたくさんあります。

  • Four billion cell phones in circulation, a billion PCs, over a billion Internet users,

    携帯電話が40億台流通し、パソコンが10億台、インターネット利用者が10億人以上。

  • 2.5 billion televisions. That's a lot of stuff to stop us being bored.

    25億台のテレビ退屈しないようにするためのものが たくさんありますね

  • And every physical space we might go is now jammed to the rafters with things demanding

    そして、私たちが行くかもしれないあらゆる物理的な空間は、今では必要なもので溢れかえっています。

  • our attention: screens, shops, all sorts of activity. Some of them in our own hands; some

    私たちの注意:画面、お店、あらゆる種類の活動。そのうちのいくつかは私たち自身の手で、いくつかは

  • of them in others.

    他の人の中でのそれらの

  • I think you can also make the case, and it's certainly true from the research we've done

    私たちが行った調査では、確かにその通りです。

  • recently, that we might've traded in boredom for suddenly being overloaded. I do wonder

    最近では、突然負荷がかかりすぎて退屈と交換してしまったのかもしれません。私は疑問に思っています

  • in a kind of slightly cheeky way if one should read a billion downloads on the app store

    アプリストアで10億ダウンロードを読むべきかどうか、ちょっと生意気な言い方をすると

  • as actually a billion reasons not to be bored and that what in fact we're doing with all

    退屈しないように実際には億の理由として、実際には何をしているのか私たちはすべてとやっている

  • of these devices and all of these objects is warding off boredom.

    これらのデバイスとこれらのオブジェクトのすべてが退屈を回避しています。

  • They're like talismans, a little tiny moment of protecting us from being bored. Because

    それはお守りのようなもので、退屈しないように守ってくれる小さな小さな瞬間です。それは

  • it turns out these devices demand our attention constantly. I interviewed a woman recently

    これらのデバイスは常に私たちの注意を必要としていることがわかります最近ある女性にインタビューしました

  • in China and she said to me of this constellation of stuff in her life that all of these devices

    中国に住んでいて、彼女が言っていたのは、彼女の人生の中にあるこの星座のことで、これらの装置はすべて、

  • were like a backpack of baby birds--great image, right?--with their mouths open screaming,

    は、口を開けて悲鳴を上げている、まるで小鳥のリュックのようだった--いいイメージでしょう?

  • "Feed me, feed me, feed me!"

    "私を養う、私を養う、私を養う! &quot.

  • She said, "Sometimes I just want to zip up the backpack and throw it in the river," which

    彼女は言った、 "Sometimes I just want to zip up backpack and throw it in the river, " which which.

  • was in and of itself a kind of stifling moment and I thought it's not good that we've got

    は、それ自体が一種の息苦しい瞬間であり、私たちが持っていることは良いことではないと思いました。

  • to the point where the demands of our devices exceed our ability to meet them and thinking

    私たちのデバイスの要求が私たちの能力を超えて、それを満たすために思考するところまで

  • about what it means to imagine resting control back with such a violent act there. It was

    そこにあるような暴力的な行為で制御を休ませることを想像することがどういうことなのかについて。それは

  • really kind of stunning.

    本当に見事なものです。

  • So I guess my plea to all of you, the thing I wish we could work out how to do, is bring

    だから、皆さんにお願いしたいことがあるんですが、どうすればいいかというと、

  • boredom back, because really if you thought about it and you were honest, when was the

    退屈さが戻ってきました、なぜならば、あなたが本当にそれを考えて、あなたが正直であれば、いつだったか

  • last time you genuinely let yourself be bored?

    最後に自分を退屈させたのは?

  • I'm willing to bet most of us roll out of bed first thing in the morning and pick up

    私たちのほとんどは、朝一番にベッドから出てきて拾うことに賭けても構わないと思っています。

  • something--any sort of digital device, because some of us sleep with it in their hands apparently,

    何か... あらゆる種類のデジタルデバイスだよ 私たちの中には それを手に持って寝る人もいるからね

  • and moving forward, we will do more of this.

    と前進していくことで、より多くのことができるようになります。

  • The data suggests one of the very first things most of us do in Australia, and in the United

    このデータによると、オーストラリアやアメリカでは、ほとんどの人が最初にすることの一つは、以下のようなことです。

  • States, and a lot of other places around the world is pick up our mobile phones, pick up

    米国、そして世界中の他の多くの場所では、私たちの携帯電話を拾い、拾います。

  • our iPads, pick up our tablets, log on, check Twitter, check Facebook, check our email.

    iPadを手に取り、タブレットを手に取り、ログオンし、Twitterをチェックし、Facebookをチェックし、メールをチェックします。

  • First thing we do, we do it all day long. I'm willing to bet most of us haven't sat

    まず最初にやることは、一日中やっていることだ。ほとんどの人が座ったことがないことに賭けるよ

  • still somewhere and done nothing. I'm willing to be most of us haven't done the moral equivalent

    まだどこかで何もしていない。私は、私たちのほとんどは、道徳的な同等のことをしていないことを喜んでいます。

  • of walking out the door and not coming back until it's dark or you're hungry with no set

    玄関を出て、暗くなるまで帰らないとか、お腹が空いているからといってノーセットで帰ってこないとか。

  • of structured activities.

    構造化された活動の

  • And what might it mean to actually think about doing that? I think there's a couple of things

    そして、実際にそうすることを考えるとどういう意味があるのか?いくつかあると思います。

  • we could do that might work. I think number one is what would it be like to actually hang

    私たちができることは、それがうまくいくかもしれません。1番に思うのは、実際に吊るすのはどうだろうか?

  • up and log off and what would that take?

    アップしてログオフして何が必要か?

  • How many of us in the room are willing to imagine an hour without our devices? And I'm

    この部屋にいる人の中で、デバイスのない1時間を想像できる人はどれくらいいるでしょうか?そして、私は

  • as guilty as many of the rest of you here in this regard. This is a hard prescription

    この点ではここにいる他の多くの人と同じように罪を犯していますこれは難しい処方箋です

  • for me to fill for myself.

    私が自分のために満たすために

  • But I'm willing to bet that it becomes a really interesting thing to imagine, and the point

    しかし、想像するだけで本当に面白いものになることは間違いないと思いますし、ポイントは

  • at which the pages of the newspapers and the technology magazines and indeed, women's magazines,

    新聞や技術雑誌、そして女性誌のページを見ていると、「あぁ、そうだな」と思います。

  • too, are now full of prescriptions about how to raise your children with Internet-free

    も、今ではインターネットを使わない子育ての処方箋がいっぱいです。

  • weekends.

    週末。

  • I saw some lovely advice columns recently about how to negotiate with your husband about

    最近、夫との交渉方法についての素敵なアドバイスコラムを見ました。

  • not bringing the Blackberry into the bedroom. Fascinating. What it might mean to think about

    寝室にブラックベリーを持ち込まない興味深いですね考えてみると意味があるかもしれないのは

  • carving out time that wasn't about being logged on, that wasn't about being connected and

    ログインしている時間ではなく、接続している時間でもない時間を大切にしています。

  • actually letting that be starts to challenge some of the things that we hear in the work

    実際にそうさせてみると、仕事の中で聞いたことのいくつかに挑戦し始めます。

  • we do.

  • I had someone recently tell me that she killed herself on Facebook. Again, a graphic image.

    最近、Facebookで自殺したという人がいました。またしても生々しい画像です

  • What does that mean? She's like, "I had to get off Facebook, so I had a Facebook suicide."

    それは何を意味するのでしょうか?彼女は's like, "I had to get off Facebook, so I had a Facebook suicide.&quot.

  • The point at which one has to imagine metaphorically killing oneself to disengage from something

    何かから離れるために自分を殺すことを比喩的に想像しなければならない時点で

  • is kind of a moment that suggests maybe we need to rewrite our relationships with these

    瞬間のようなもので、多分私たちはこれらとの関係を書き換える必要があることを示唆しています。

  • devices, because after all, as someone who is in the technology business, one of the

    デバイスは、結局のところ、技術ビジネスに携わっている者としては、その一つである。

  • things I can tell you is that every one of those devices in your hands, in your backpacks,

    私が言えることは、あなたの手にあるデバイスの一つ一つが、あなたのバックパックの中にあるということです。

  • by your bedside, they work better when they're constantly connected--constantly connected

    あなたのベッドサイドでは、彼らが常に接続されているとき、彼らはより良い仕事をしています - 常に接続されています。

  • to power, constantly connected to the network, constantly connected to content.

    電力を供給し、常にネットワークに接続し、常にコンテンツに接続しています。

  • But the thing about human beings, and it's been true for thousands of years, human beings

    しかし、人間についてのことですが、何千年も前からそうでした。

  • work better when we're intimately disconnected. Think of every major world system. Think of

    密接に切り離されている時の方が良い仕事をしている世界の主要なシステムを考えてみましょう考えてみてください

  • every major system that says we take the Sabbath and we have a different kind of relationship

    安息日を取ると言っている主要な制度と、それとは別の関係を持っていると言っている制度があります。

  • to time and space. We pray, we meditate, we fast. There's a whole lot of ways we imagine

    時空を超えて私たちは祈り、瞑想し、断食します。私たちが想像する方法は実にたくさんあります。

  • structurally being disconnected and how we map that back to this technology is, for me,

    私にとっては、構造的に切断されていることと、それをこの技術にどのようにマッピングするかが重要なのです。

  • I think both a personal and a professional challenge. I think number one prescription

    個人的にも仕事上の課題でもあると思います。ナンバーワンの処方箋だと思います

  • for how we might get back to bored, hang up and log off and do it more than once.

    退屈に戻り、ハングアップしてログオフして何度もやるかもしれない方法のために。

  • The second thing is we might have to actually work out how to make spaces to be bored. I

    2つ目は、実際にどうやって退屈しないように空間を作るかを工夫しないといけないかもしれません。I

  • see some beginnings of this. Anyone who's been in the U.K. recently, or indeed in the

    その始まりを見ることができます。最近、イギリスに行ったことがある人なら誰でも、あるいは実際に

  • United States, public transportation now provides train carriages that are phone-free called

    アメリカの公共交通機関では、現在、電話のない電車の客車を提供しています。

  • quiet carriages. I'm not really sure they're supposed to be bored. In fact, they're supposed

    静かな馬車。彼らが退屈しているとは思えない。実際、彼らは

  • to encourage you to work, but the interesting thing about hanging up your mobile devices

    仕事の励みになるが、携帯端末をぶら下げる面白さ

  • may be that you could be bored.

    飽きられる可能性があるかもしれません。

  • This sign comes from a church in Korea where I did field work not so long ago and it reads,

    この看板は、私が少し前にフィールドワークをした韓国の教会から来たもので、それは読んでいます。

  • "It would be a blessing if you turned off your phone." The sign next to it says, "Turn

    "It would be blessing if you turned off your phone." the sign next to the next to say, " Turn

  • off your phone and listen for the call of God." And the third sign says, "We have a

    あなたの携帯電話をオフにして、神のコールに耳を傾ける。

  • cell [unintelligible 14:25] so none of it's going to work anyway."

    cell [unintelligible 14:25] so no of it's going to work anyway.&quot.

  • What's fascinating about this--I don't mean to suggest churches are places we are bored,

    このことについて魅力的なのは,教会が退屈な場所だと言っているわけではないということです。

  • but they are places where we can imagine a different kind of relationship to time and

    が、時間との関係性の違いを想像させてくれる場所であり

  • space. And how you start to carve out spaces that aren't about constant connectively is

    スペースのことです。そして、どのようにして一定の接続性を持たない空間を切り分け始めるかというと

  • an interesting challenge.

    興味深い挑戦。

  • And failing all else, we can always be bored together. The data firmly suggests that teenage

    他のすべてを失敗しても、いつでも一緒に退屈することができます。データがしっかりと示唆しているのは、10代の

  • kids when asked about what it is that they like to do say, "Well, we're all a bit bored."

    それは彼らが言う、"まあ、私たちはすべてのビットbored.&quotを行うのが好きであることが何であるかについて尋ねられたときの子供たち。

  • Well, what's better than being bored? Better than being bored is better than being bored

    さて、退屈するよりも良いことは何ですか?退屈しているよりも良いのは、退屈しているよりも良いです。

  • together. And frankly, when you listen to the ways some of us talk about using Facebook,

    を一緒に考えましょう。率直に言って Facebookの使い方を聞いてみると

  • "I went on onto Facebook because I was bored," suggests that at least we know how to imagine

    "I went on on on on on Facebook because I was bored, " suggests that least we know how to imagine.

  • being bored in groups, if not by ourselves.

    集団では飽き足らず

  • So I guess my plea to all of us here, in the words of Heidegger, is to spend less of our

    ハイデガーの言葉を借りれば、ここにいる私たち全員への嘆願は、私たちの生活を

  • time putting boredom to sleep, less of our time being connected, and more of our time

    つながりの時間を削って退屈な時間を眠らせ、つないでいる時間を削って、より多くの時間を割く