Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • It's... It's surreal.

    不思議な気分だ

  • To walk through a town that was once so full of life now slowly being consumed by nature,

    かつては人の営みが満ち溢れていたが、

  • half of it hidden away behind barricades in a contaminated 'no-go' zone.

    今は自然に包み込まれつついるある街を歩いている

  • As you walk past degraded houses with shattered windows, overgrown shop-fronts and collapsing shrines,

    街の半分は、汚染された「帰還困難区域」 のバリケードの後ろに隠れている

  • you start to put it all together like pieces in a puzzle.

    劣化した家、粉々に飛び散った窓、 緑が生い茂った店先

  • You can start to imagine what life must've been like here...

    崩壊しかかった神社を通り過ぎると

  • ... before it became the backdrop of the second worst nuclear disaster in history.

    ジグソーのように全てが繋がりはじめ

  • Fukushima Daiichi was once one of the largest operational nuclear power stations on the planet.

    ここの生活がどんなものだったのか 想像ができる

  • Now, it's one of the worst man-made disasters in history.

    歴史上2番目の大きさとなってしまった 原子力発電所における災害の以前、

  • I've come to the exclusion zone to piece together what's happened in the 8 years since the disaster,

    「福島第一」は、かつて世界でも最大級の 原子力発電所だった。

  • to hear from the locals who've endured the nightmarish aftermath,

    しかし今では、世界でも最大級の事故現場のひとつとなってしまった。

  • and to see what the future might hold for the area.

    震災以降、この8年間で何が 起こったのかを理解するため

  • It's a story that starts with a devastating tsunami, so powerful it moved the entire planet off its axis,

    悪夢のような余波に耐えた 地元の人々から話を聞くため

  • and ends in a nuclear disaster with a mammoth $200bn clean up operation,

    そして、未来がこの地域に何をもたらすのかを確かめるために

  • involving 70,000 workers that will take an estimated 40 years to complete,

    僕は帰還困難区域の境界線までやってきた

  • and is almost incomprehensible in scale.

    始まりは地球全体をその地軸から退かせるほどに強大な

  • --So we're currently one hour outside of Tokyo.

    凄まじい津波だった

  • It takes about three and a half hours by car from Tokyo to the exclusion zone.

    2,000億ドル(民間試算)という、とてつもない額の除染作業を必要とする災害

  • I've been advised to bring a Geiger counter along just to detect any pockets of radiation.

    推定で7万人の作業員でも 除染完了するまでに40年掛かると言われている

  • It's currently registering, uh... 0.09, which is what you expect for the background radiation for this region around Tokyo to be.

    その規模を把握することは難しい

  • Yeah, I'd be lying if I said I wasn't slightly anxious, but...

    東京を離れて1時間くらいの場所まで来た

  • me visiting for a couple of days is nothing compared to the workers that have to clean up the area,

    東京から「避難地域」までは 車で約3時間半かかる

  • and the thousands of local residents who lost everything - who lost their homes, their possessions,

    今回、ホットスポットを検出する ガイガーカウンターを携帯するようにアドバイスされた

  • and their livelihoods.

    現在の表示は…毎時0.09マイクロシーベルトだ

  • The exclusion zone is situated on Fukushima's remote east coastline

    この値は、東京周辺地域の「環境放射線」の濃度と同じくらい

  • across a 70 kilometer mountain range separating it from cities such as Koriyama and Fukushima City.

    全く心配がないと言ったら嘘になるけど…

  • Today, the exclusion zone is not a simple radius around the power plant,

    数日間滞在することくらいは、何ともない。

  • but a patch-work of towns that have been cleaned up and dense forests that have yet to be decontaminated.

    その地域を除染しなければならない作業員や

  • --I've always... thought about visiting the exclusion zone.

    家を失い、財産を失い、暮らしを失い、

  • It's always been something I've considered doing.

    全てを失った数千人の地元住民の人々と比べれば

  • Um, especially given that I live about two and a half hours north in Sendai.

    避難地域は、福島の遠隔の東海岸にある

  • Why am I visiting the region now? Well,

    郡山市や福島市などの都市部から隔てられた70kmの 山脈にまたがっている

  • I know people that live and work in Fukushima.

    現在、避難地域は単純に原子力発電所の周りを 囲む半径だけではなく

  • I know people that have visited the region.

    完全に除染された街、そしてまだ除染されていない森へと 「つぎはぎ細工」のように広がっている

  • I've come with the hope of actually trying to dig a little bit deeper

    僕はいつも...

  • and hear some of the stories of the people that call the exclusion zone 'home'.

    避難地域を訪れてみたかった

  • As we make our way into the exclusion zone, the highway starts to become filled with convoys of trucks,

    ずっと訪れてみたかった

  • carrying contaminated soil.

    何故、今この地域を訪れるのか?

  • Just a few of the 355,000 trucks that have so far been used in the clean-up effort.

    僕は今、ここから北に2時間半ほどの仙台に住んでいて

  • And where you'd normally see sign posts,

    福島に住み、働いている人達も知っている

  • instead, Geiger counters loom, ominously revealing the elevated radiation levels.

    そして、この地域を訪れた人達も知っている この地域を実際に訪れることで

  • The figures creep higher and higher the further we go.

    ここで今何が今起こっているのかをもう少し深く知りたい そしてこの避難地域を「故郷」と呼ぶ

  • Huge piles of soil begin to appear at the side of the highway,

    人々の話をいくつか聞いてみたいんだ

  • and in the distance I catch my first glimpse of the reactor itself,

    避難地域の境界線まで来ると、 高速道路はトラックの車列で一杯になり出した

  • nestled amongst a sea of cranes.

    汚染された土壌を運ぶトラックだ

  • All of a sudden I feel like I've arrived in a different world.

    これまで除染作業で使用された 35万5千台のトラックのほんの一部だ

  • The Fukushima exclusion zone is not the sort of place you'd want to make a wrong turn.

    また、通常は道路標識が表示される場所には

  • And to that end, I'm going in with an experienced guide, Fumito Sasaki,

    上昇する放射線量を刻々と表す 放射線量測定器があった

  • who understands the region and the risks involved, having run numerous tours inside the area.

    数値は、僕らが進むにつれ徐々に高くなっていく

  • And our first stop is what was once the town of Ukedo, on the coastline just north of the Daiichi reactor.

    高速道路の脇には、大量の土の山が現れ始め

  • There's a clock up there that's stopped at 3:38.

    遠く離れた場所から、初めて原子力発電所が垣間見える

  • That was the time that the tsunami actually hit the school and cut off the power.

    クレーンに囲まれ

  • The power of the clock was in the staffroom, and that went with the tsunami.

    僕は別の世界に来たように感じた

  • While the spectre of the nuclear disaster still looms large,

    福島の避難地域は どこでも勝手に入っていける場所ではない

  • it can be easy to overlook the fact that the nightmare began with a tsunami that ultimately killed over 20,000 people, on March 11, 2011.

    そのため、経験豊富なガイドである佐々木 文人さんに同行してもらった

  • Ukedo School was just 200 meters from the shoreline when the waves struck,

    この地域とリスクを理解しながら 地域内での数多くのツアーを実施している人だ

  • however after the initial magnitude 9 earthquake,

    最初の目的地は、かつて第一原発のすぐ北の海岸線上にあった「請戸地区」だ

  • teachers hastily evacuated the 80 students to a nearby hill inland.

    あそこに時計がある 3時38分で止まってる

  • And with just minutes to spare, all of the children were saved.

    これは津波が学校を襲い 停電した時刻だ

  • The rest of Ukedo... wasn't so lucky.

    時計の電気は職員室から供給されていたため 津波と同時に止まったようだ

  • What was once a town of 1,900 people had been washed away by a 15 meter wave,

    原発事故の影響は未だこの地域で大きな影を落としている

  • taking 300 people with it.

    あの津波によって引き起こされた悪夢のような出来事は

  • As chilling as this school is, for me there's a sense of relief that all the kids were able to get out safely.

    2011年3月11日に2万人以上を犠牲にした

  • All that remains is Ukedo Elementary School.

    請戸小学校は海岸からわずか200メートルのところに 建っていた

  • That's the only marker that lets you know that there was once a town here.

    最初のマグニチュード9の地震の後

  • Instead of the sound of kids playing and running around,

    教師たちは急いで、80人の生徒達を内陸の高台に避難させ

  • all you can hear in the background is the sound of diggers pushing around bags of radioactive soil.

    ほんの数分の差で子供たちは全員助かった

  • It's quite the contrast.

    しかし請戸の全ての人々が助かったわけではなかった

  • --So right now, we are just 5 kilometers along the coastline from the Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    かつて1,900人が住んでいたこの町は、 15メートルの津波に流され

  • And interestingly, we've got the Geiger counter out and it reads 0.09 microsieverts,

    300もの人々が犠牲となった

  • which is about the same as Tokyo.

    この学校にいると津波の恐怖と 子供たちが全員、安全に脱出できたという

  • Even though we are quite close to it.

    安堵の気持ちが一緒に湧き出てきて複雑だ

  • Actually, the more dangerous areas are where the fallout was blown on the day the reactor exploded.

    今ここに残っているのは、請戸小学校の建物だけで

  • So inland, towards the north, is a little bit more treacherous than it is here.

    この学校はかつてここに町があったことを 示す唯一の印となっている

  • The government already decontaminated this area.

    今では、子供たちが遊んで走り回っている音の代わりに

  • --Right. So,

    聞こえるのは、放射性土壌を掘る ショベルカーの音だけだ

  • the number of radiation dose is the same as Tokyo.

    全く対照的だ

  • And you can actually see the ridiculous, incredible scale of the decontamination.

    僕らは今、第一原子力発電所から海岸線に沿ってわずか5kmのところにいる

  • Over here, we've got about-- it must be the size of ten football fields.

    興味深いことに、ガイガーカウンダーには

  • This whole area is covered in bags of soil.

    毎時0.09マイクロシーベルトと表示されてる

  • By 2021, 14 million cubic meters of topsoil will have been removed from the exclusion zone,

    これは東京とほぼ同じ値だ ―そうです。

  • part of a $29bn operation focused on lowering radiation levels.

    原発からとても近いにも関わらずだ

  • The soil and debris is packed into bags and blankets the landscape.

    ホットスポットとは、原子炉が爆発した日に 「放射性降下物」が風に吹き飛ばされた場所

  • Ukedo is just one of many temporary storage locations.

    よって内陸の北側は ここよりも少しだけ線量が高いんだ

  • Though where to store the soil in the long term remains an ongoing political issue.

    政府はすでにこの地域を除染しています ―なるほど

  • On our way to the partially reopened town of Tomioka, we travelled down one of the worst-affected areas.

    だから、放射線量の値が東京と同じなんです

  • A stretch of road, where it's forbidden to even leave your vehicle due to the higher levels of radiation.

    実際に信じられないような規模の 除染行われている

  • It's an eerie sight.

    ここだけでもサッカー場 約10個くらいの規模はあるだろう

  • Game centers, gas stations... suspended in time.

    このエリア全体が、土の入った袋で覆われている

  • And slowly being buried beneath trees and foliage as nature reclaims its surroundings.

    2021年までに、放射線レベルを低下させるため 290億ドルを費やす除染事業の一部として

  • Look at this.

    1,400万立方メートルの表土が 避難地域から取り除かれる予定だ

  • This is the border between Tomioka's no-go zone, and the bit where people are allowed to come back and live.

    土壌と瓦礫は袋に詰められ、景色を覆っている

  • If your house is there, you can't go back. It's not been decontaminated - you can't go back at all.

    請戸は、数多くある一時保管場所の1つに過ぎない

  • But yeah, if you lived just 10 meters this side of the road, you can come back.

    この土を長期的にどこへ保管するかは 現在も審議されている政治的問題だ

  • There's your house, you can return.

    部分的に避難指示解除された 富岡町へに向かう途中

  • That is the difference between being able to come back to your life and not being able to return at all.

    最も被害の大きかった地域のひとつを通った

  • Just a 10 meter gap across the road.

    放射線レベルが高いため車両を 離れることさえ禁止されている道路

  • --What was the population here before the disaster? What is it now?

    ぞっとする光景だ

  • [Fumito Sasaki]: Before the accident, it was 16,000 people.

    時間が止まったゲームセンターにガソリンスタンド…

  • [CB]: 16,000 people...

    そしてそれらは木々や木の葉の下にゆっくりと埋まっていく

  • Now, it's about 1,000 people.

    自然がその環境を取り戻しているかのように

  • So less than 10%.

    これを見て

  • Yeah, and I mean we're standing here in front of an elementary school,

    これが境界だ

  • that's derelict, and there's a Geiger counter quite literally in the playground here showing us the figures.

    富岡町の帰還困難区域と 帰宅許可されてる区域との

  • In terms of the school population, what were the numbers before and after the disaster?

    もしそこに家があったなら、戻ることが出来ない

  • [FS]: Before the disaster, there were 1,400 students in this town.

    除染されていないから、全く戻ることができないんだ

  • But now, they only have 20 students.

    でも僅か10メートル道路のこちら側に 住んでいた場合、戻ることができる

  • 20...

    帰れる家がある。そこが違いだ。

  • Obviously a lot of people, having left this town after the disaster, have moved on now.

    自分の元の人生に戻れることと、全く戻れないことの

  • They've started new lives, right? In other towns across the country, so...

    道路をまたいで、たった10メートルの差だ

  • I guess getting any people to come back at all is a-- is just a success, to some extent.

    災害前の人口は何人だったのですか?現在は?

  • This was the main cherry blossom street in Tomioka, right?

    事故前は、1万6千人でした

  • [FS]: Yes, this is a symbol of this town. Cherry Blossom Street.

    1万6千人… ―はい

  • But these cherry blossoms are only 20% of the cherry blossom street.

    今は、1,000人くらいです

  • Only 20% is here?

    だから10%以下です

  • Yeah.

    現在小学校の前にいます

  • And the other 80%?

    放棄され、校庭には 放射線量測定器があります

  • The rest of them is inside of the no-go zone.

    数値を表示するために

  • [CB]: And are people allowed to ever go from Tomioka into the no-go zone?

    災害前後の生徒人口数は?

  • [FS]: The residents can get permission to enter the no-go zone.

    震災前は、この町に1,400人の学生がいました

  • After 8 years of lying abandoned, many of Tomioka's houses are collapsing.

    でも今は、たった20人しかいません ―20人…

  • Residents who don't plan to return at all are able to have their houses bulldozed for free by the government.

    はい

  • Unsurprisingly, many have been marked for demolition.

    災害後この町を去った多くの人々が、今は前に進み

  • In just the three years after the disaster, there were 1,200 cases of theft reported.

    新しい生活を始めていますよね?

  • Obviously, a lot of the damage here was done by the earthquake itself.

    他の場所で。。。ある意味

  • But you see smashed windows around, and that's because wild boar running loose around the area have been breaking into buildings,

    ここに人が戻ってくるというのは

  • and also a lot of people have been stealing from towns like Tomioka and Namie,

    ある意味「成功」だと思います

  • because it's open season for burglars to come in and break into people's property.

    ここは…富岡町の桜の大通りでしたよね?

  • This used to be a pharmacy.

    はい、これはこの町のシンボルです 「桜通り」

  • This is one of the few buildings I've seen so far where there's no damage to the windows.

    しかしこの「桜通り」にある桜の木は20%にしか 過ぎません

  • It looks like nobody's been in here.

    20%だけがここにある? ―はい

  • I've got the Geiger counter. It's 0.25 microsieverts,

    残りの80%は? ―帰還困難区域の中にあります

  • which is a little bit higher than the coastline.

    人々はそこに入ることを許可されているんですか?

  • I've actually found the Geiger counter relatively reassuring today.

    富岡町の帰還困難区域に行くことを?

  • It's not been quite the levels I was anticipating.

    居住者は

  • Would I feel comfortable living here?

    帰還困難区域に入る「許可」を 得ることができます

  • I'm not sure.

    8年間放置されたまま時間が過ぎ、富岡町の家屋の多くは崩壊しかけている

  • And I suspect if I did go into areas that haven't yet been decontaminated,

    全く帰宅する予定のない居住者には、政府が無料で家屋をブルドーザーで整地する

  • I would get pretty uncomfortable quite fast.

    当然のことながら、家屋の多くは解体予定のステッカーが貼られている

  • Japan's reconstruction agency estimates there have been over 2,200 disaster-related deaths

    壊れた窓が見えますよね?

  • as the result of the trauma and stress the evacuees endured being ripped away from their lives.

    あれは野生のイノシシによって壊されたんです

  • This is one of the main motivations Japan has for attempting to decontaminate Fukushima.

    腰より高い位置の壊れた窓は、人がやったものです

  • With almost 42,000 evacuees still living outside the area,

    災害からわずか3年で、1,200件の盗難が報告された

  • by giving them the option to return to their hometowns, if not to live then just to visit, it may prevent further deaths.

    ここでの多くの被害は 地震によってもたらされたものです

  • And at a rate of 0.3 microsieverts per hour, or 2.6 millisieverts over the course of a year,

    でも、周囲に窓が砕け散っているのは

  • whilst the levels are higher than Tokyo,

    野生のイノシシがその辺りを自由に走り回って

  • it still places the decontaminated areas within the average world background radiation levels of 1.5 to 3.5 millisieverts.

    建物に侵入したからです

  • But, the contaminated area is vast,

    また富岡町や浪江町などでは 多数の窃盗が起こっていた

  • with hotspots spread across forests and mountains, many of which are impossible to reach.

    なぜなら窃盗犯にとって 家屋に侵入して財産を奪うのに

  • After the evacuation, many farms across the region were abandoned,

    このエリアは自由に行動しやすかった

  • with animals and cattle being left behind to die.

    これは薬局だったところだ

  • The radioactive fallout meant animals in the region were no longer safe for consumption.

    これまで僕が見た中で、窓が損傷していない数少ない建物のひとつだ

  • But when the government ordered remaining farmers to euthanise their cattle,

    誰も入ったことが無いように見える

  • not everyone followed the order.

    ガイガーカウンターによると 0.25マイクロシーベルトだ

  • Masami Yoshizawa was one of those people.

    海岸部よりもほんの少し高い数値だ

  • 14 kilometers from the reactor, his 328 cows were worth 450 million yen before they were exposed to the radiation.

    ガイガーカウンターを持ち歩いて 比較的安心できることが分かった

  • In protest to the government, he vowed to keep his cows alive for as long as possible

    僕が予想していた程のレベルでは全くなかった

  • even taking on cows from other farms that had been abandoned.

    ここで快適に生活ができるだろうか それは分からない

  • Feeding cows isn't cheap though, and so he accepts donations of food,

    実際、まだ除染されていない地域に間違って入ったとしたら

  • most notably, a staggering amount of pineapple skins.

    気持ちは良くないだろう

  • Cow godzilla!

    日本の復興庁は、トラウマと精神的ストレスが原因の

  • So, when the self-defence force came here to the area to clean up and help in the recovery effort,

    災害関連の死者が2,200人以上出ていると推定している

  • Yoshizawa-san created this cow-zilla

    それらの避難者はそれまでの生活から引き離され 耐えることができなかった

  • to kind of inspire the troops and keep them motivated.

    これが、日本政府が福島の除染を行っている主な動機の一つだ

  • Whether it worked or not, I'm not at liberty to say.

    約4万2千人の避難者がまだ地域外に住んでいるため

  • But it is quite the sight.

    故郷に戻るという選択肢を与えられることで

  • During my two-day visit to the Fukushima exclusion zone, I've been staying in Iwaki city just 30 kilometers south,

    居住できない場合は、故郷を訪れるだけでも、 これ以上の死を防ぐことに繋がるのかもしれない

  • which has fully recovered following on from the tsunami.

    そして線量レベルは、毎時0.3マイクロシーベルト、年間を通して2.6ミリシーベルト

  • This area has been spared much of the damage caused by the nuclear reactor.

    これは東京よりも高いものの

  • Iwaki city was hit by the tsunami and this hot spring, in fact, was washed away.

    除染されたエリアは、環境放射線世界平均の

  • It took two years to reopen.

    1.5~3.5ミリシーベルトの範囲内に収まっている

  • But for the most part, it's business as usual in Iwaki now.

    しかし、汚染地域は広大で

  • Fortunately for Iwaki, on the day the nuclear reactor exploded,

    森林や山に広がる「ホットスポット」があり、

  • the southerly winds carried the radioactive fallout north.

    その多くは入っていくことさえ難しい

  • The radiation levels here are pretty much on par with Tokyo,

    避難が行われると、この地域の多くの農場が放棄され

  • and, in fact, many people leaving the exclusion zone came here to Iwaki to make it their new home.

    そこには、取り残された動物や牛がいた

  • For Kaniarai Hot Spring, after the recovery, it's business as usual and it remains a popular resort on the coast,

    放射性降下物は、この地域の動物たちが

  • although the memories of the tsunami still remain fresh in the minds of those working on the day of the disaster.

    「消費」をされるのに安全ではなくなったことを意味する

  • The reconstruction work along these coasts has ultimately succeeded in hiding much of the damage,

    政府が農家に残りの牛を安楽死させるよう指示を出した時

  • including the Kaniarai Hot Spring.

    皆がその指示に従った訳ではなかった 吉沢 正巳さんは、その中の一人だ

  • However, if you know where to look, you can still find the marks left behind to this day.

    原子炉から14km離れて

  • So whilst Kaniarai Onsen has been completely renovated,

    吉沢さんの飼育する328頭の牛は 放射線に被爆する前は

  • there's still some little clues that something terrible happened here.

    4億5,000万円の価値があった

  • These are the shoe lockers. When you walk in, you take off your shoes and you put them in a locker.

    彼は政府への抗議として、牛たちを可能な限り 長く生存させると誓った

  • And you can actually see how high the wave came up to just by looking at the different lockers.

    放棄された、他の農場の牛を 引き取ることさえもした

  • This one was fine.

    しかし牛に餌を与え続けるコストは安くない 故、現在は飼料の寄付を受け入れている

  • This one, however - with the newspaper on - this was destroyed by the tsunami.

    驚いたのは飼料として与えられる圧倒的な量のパイナップルの皮だ

  • Or the locker has rusted away inside.

    牛のゴジラだ!

  • It's a small indicator of what happened here.

    自衛隊が、除染と復興支援の為にこの地域にやってき始めた同時期に

  • Deciding whether or not to return to your home town after such a disaster

    吉沢さんはこの「牛ゴジラ」を制作した

  • must be one of the hardest decisions you can make.

    復興支援に来た隊員を鼓舞するために

  • Heading once more into the exclusion zone, I meet one of the first returning evacuees

    その効果があったかどうかは 僕にはなんとも言えない

  • to try and understand what led him to come back.

    それにしても凄いものを作ったもんだ

  • Katsumi Arakawa was born in Ukedo town

    今回、福島の帰還困難区域近辺に2日間訪問したが、

  • and was evacuated 300 kilometers north to Akita prefecture after the disaster.

    その期間、僕らはそこから南に30km離れたいわき市内に宿泊した

  • Not only has he returned to the area, but in February 2018 he started a business growing flowers.

    そこは津波の被害から完全に復興していた

  • Difficult task, given much of the original mineral-rich, fertile soil was removed during decontamination.

    この地域は、いわき市は津波に襲われ、

  • It's a welcome sight to see these beautiful flowers blooming after all the chaos we've seen - all the destruction.

    実際この温泉も波に飲まれ、再開には2年かかったが、

  • It's inspiring to hear people, like Katsumi-san, who want to come back to the area

    原発事故による被害はほぼ無かった

  • and give it another go despite potential risks.

    そして現在、いわき市の商業施設は ほぼ通常通り営業している

  • Thank god he did.

    いわき市にとって幸いだったのは、原発事故が起きた日

  • I mean, literally and metaphorically, life is blooming once again because of Katsumi-san.

    放射性降下物は南風によって北に向かって拡散した

  • In recent years, even though many previous residents haven't moved back to their hometown of Tomioka,

    ここいわき市の放射線レベルは東京とほぼ変わらず

  • many still regularly return.

    実際、避難地域を去った多くの人々が

  • This year, Tomioka's empty streets sprung to life once more for the cherry blossom season,

    ここいわき市に移住し、新たに生活を始めたんだ

  • when once desolate streets bustle to the sounds of friends and families partying and celebrating the season.

    蟹洗温泉は復興後

  • Meanwhile, in the once empty fields, many of which may never harvest crops again,

    通常通りの営業を続けており 依然として沿岸部で人気の健康センターとなっている

  • there may yet be hope that they can be utilized to the benefit of the locals.

    津波の記憶は、震災の日、そこで働いていた人々の心の中に

  • What kind of jobs are they going to create in Tomioka do you think?

    脳裏にまだ鮮明に残っている

  • Uhh, it's a difficult question, but...

    福島県の浜通りが震災によって受けた物理的な被害は その後の復興事業により、ここ蟹洗温泉も含めて

  • Some people have started to make a solar power plant.

    もうあまり見ることはできない

  • Solar power?

    しかし、よく目を凝らすと 今でもその痕跡を見つけることができる

  • Yes.

    震災後、蟹洗温泉は全面改装されたけれど

  • Wow.

    ここにも小さいながら 震災の爪痕をみることができる

  • As you pass through the exclusion zone, nearly every other field is lined with solar panels.

    これは靴のロッカー

  • Thousands of them.

    ここに来たお客さんは、靴を脱いでロッカーに入れるんだけど

  • Both agriculture and the Daiichi plant were once the lifeblood of the local economy.

    津波がどれくらいの高さまできたのか

  • Now, the unusable land is being turned into a means to produce clean energy

    このロッカーで実際に見ることができる

  • and a potential alternate source of income to landowners.

    このロッカーは大丈夫 だけどこれは…

  • I'm glad I finally came here and saw it all with my own eyes after hearing about it continuously for 8 years now.

    新聞を敷いているのは、 津波によって壊されたものだ

  • It's difficult for me to comprehend what I've seen here in Fukushima.

    ロッカーの内側が錆びている

  • This is not a normal situation,

    ここで何が起こったかを伝える

  • and I came here naively hoping to try and tell the story of what happened after the disaster,

    小さな証拠だ

  • but this is a situation that's very far from being over.

    震災後に自分の故郷に戻るかどうかを 決めることは