中級 76 タグ追加 保存
動画の字幕をクリックしてすぐ単語の意味を調べられます!
単語帳読み込み中…
字幕の修正報告
Whose is it?
I can't...
Or don't you know?
I want you out of here by tonight.
Where should I go?
I'll put you in the hotel until I can arrange you a passage back to London.
I've a good mind to send you steerage.
Do if you want to.
You needn't think your mother's getting out of our arrangement.
What?
She agreed to pay me 300 pounds a year as long as we're married.
And I've no intention of giving you a divorce.
But that's almost half of her income.
It's what she agreed.
I had no idea.
- I have it in writing. - Then it's between you and her.
Whose is it?
Tell me!
I can't tell you.
Why did you do it?
Nomura Yoshio.
I am here on orders from Colonel Kurihama.
Is he here?
No.
But I have orders. You must go to Dalian.
I know.
I have to ship out from there back to London.
No.
No'?
From Dairen, you will go to Shimonoseki.
- Where? - In Japan.
- What? - Yes.
You must live in Tokyo.
Here's your ticket.
Mrs. Collingsworth?
No.
Miss Mackenzie.
Do sit down and make yourself comfortable.
I know who you are, but perhaps you've not been told anything about me?
No, I'm afraid I haven't.
My name is Aiko Onnodera, Baroness.
Not that it matters.
Except, I suppose, Kurihama could scarcely have overcome his distaste for my beliefs
if we hadn't known each other from childhood.
Oh, l see!
He's asked you to come and meet me.
And, fortunately, I was able to.
Thanks to my early release from prison.
You are too polite to ask why I was in prison,
but I expect you would like to know.
I was protesting outside a newspaper office in Tokyo
and I saw this journalist who wrote,
"Japanese women will not the vote in a thousand years".
It seems I hit him with my banner.
The women I met in England were very determined
and I'm sure they'll be a great deal of trouble in the next few years.
But none of them seem to realize how fortunate she was
compared to us Japanese.
I'm afraid I've never really thought about these things.
My dear,
you are now in a country where there isn't even universal suffrage for men.
The first time I was arrested was for trying to get in
to listen to a debate in the Diet.
In court, I asked if they were afraid of us finding out how boring their debates were.
They doubled the fine.
You're what my mother used to call a professional agitator.
Tradition is even more important in my country than it is in yours.
And my family has a tradition of dissent.
My grandfather made a passionate speech in the Diet,
denouncing the power of the army and the amount of money it wasted.
The following night, he was assassinated.
They broke into the house and...
cut him to pieces.
Are you married?
No.
I am like you.
I'm an outcast.
To be a divorced woman is much more of a disgrace here
than it ever could be in Europe.
- I'm not divorced. - Yes.
But I am.
Onnodera was very embarrassed by my politics,
but he is a...
tolerant man,
In the end, there was something else which affected him far more deeply.
What was that?
I am barren. I can never have a child.
Kentaro.
Do you know what his intentions are?
You haven't heard from him'?
Nothing. No, I...
I just felt...
whatever it was had to be better than crawling back to Scotland.
Well, he has...
I am to take you to a house he has found for you in Tsukiji, in Tokyo,
which is one of the areas where foreigners are expected to live.
- You'll have two servants and, er-- - Yes, but...
Does he mean...
Well...
...to marry me or...
You don't know?
What?
He is married.
He has four children.
This is Misao San, your maid, and Fukuda, the cook.
First thing I must do is learn their language.
Perhaps.
If I had a dictionary, at least I could communicate with them.
They can read?
Of course, they can read. This is not one of those backward countries, you know.
I'm sorry.
I'll send a rickshaw for you tomorrow and take you to meet your doctor.
You've been very kind.
Thank you.
I should tell you,
women of your class are not supposed to go out on their own.
What class is that?
You will find there are many restrictions in the life of a...
Of a what?
A concubine.
A concubine'?
Is that what I am?
The term is purely technical.
Oh, well...
That's all right then.
No!
You stay.
No.
I'm just going for a walk. You stay here.
Your dictionary.
Thank you.
I have to go away tomorrow.
Oh'?
On a speaking tour.
I try to talk to women in all the villages.
- What about? - Their condition.
Japanese women are expected to observe the three obedience's.
- Do you know about this'? - No.
First, they must be obedient to their parents.
Then, to their husband and his parents.
And, finally, when they're old, they must obey their sons.
I see.
Obedience is a habit that is not easy to break,
and most of them are told by their husbands or fathers or sons not to come to my meetings.
It sounds to me like an uphill struggle.
The further you get from Tokyo, the more oppression you find
and the more oppressed they are, the less they understand what you're telling them.
But l feel the least I can do is try.
What does "Gaijin" mean?
Gaijin?
I've heard it a lot. Does it mean "hello"
No.
No, it doesn't.
Well...what does it mean?
It means, er...
"foreigner".
I expect you to be tired?
Yes. Exhausted most of the time.
- And... quite a lot of vomiting. - Any bleeding?
Some, yes.
Just a few spots.
I think you should take plenty of rest and stay home.
Yes, Alicia.
I asked her to come and see you.
I had no idea.
A missionary. I thought she was just some busybody.
I like her.
I think she's given up trying to convert the Japanese.
She's just got used to being here.
I told her I'd probably be away when the baby's born.
I wanted someone to be there if you needed anything.
Thank you.
Isn't she beautiful?
Yes.
She is probably a courtesan.
You can tell by the way she wears a kimono.
Oh'?
All the actors are men, you know.
Like in Shakespeare's time.
Why is she so unhappy?
She's found her son but cannot keep him with her.
He's agreed to go away and not disgrace her.
But now she cannot bear to see him leave.
It breaks her heart.
Yaaah!
Thank you.
Dr lkeda has asked me to have a little word with you.
- The baby's all right, isn't he'? - Of course he is.
He's absolutely fine. Strong as a horse.
Then...what is it?
It seems...
Well, it seems there were some, er...
Com plications during the delivery.
I'm afraid my Japanese isn't quite good enough to decipher all the details.
It's not a field I know very much about.
But the upshot of it is...
It seems you won't be able to have any more children.
Well...
...that's not so bad.
I'm sure he'll be more than enough.
Have you thought of a name for him'?
One of the nurses used to call him Taro.
- That's from a story, isn't it? - That's right.
I thought I might call him Taro.
Oh! Ssh, ssh, ssh!
A kimono for a concubine.
I've been thinking of emigrating to America.
Surely not'?
I'm not sure they'd consider me morally acceptable.
I don't know what it would be like for Taro.
You must wait until Kurihama returns.
You think he'll come to visit me'?
The war will be over in a few weeks. Give him that time.
- Don't you like it here? - Oh, it's not that.
I just find it so difficult.
I don't seem to be making any progress with the language.
I can't get used to the food.
Did it take you a long time to adjust?
I've always loved the country.
I've been here 20 years,
without, as far as I know, making a single convert.
But I couldn't swear to it because the Japanese are so polite.
But I don't think they have much of a feel for Anglicanism.
Not that I mind all that much though.
And as far as God is concerned,
I suspect the effort is what matters the most.
Why America and not your own country?
I couldn't go back there now. I'm not even sure they'd let me take Taro.
Shortbread'?
- Where on earth did you find this'? - It's home-made. Not a very demanding recipe.
It would not be fair to Kurihama to take away his child, don't you think'?
I suppose I should wait to find out what he intends.
If anything.
Next week is the Festival of the Dead.
- That doesn't sound very cheerful. - I must take you out one night to see it.
You should understand some of our customs.
- I don't like the idea of leaving him at night. - You must bring him!
It's good luck for children to greet the dead.
And you should come also, Alicia.
I've tried very hard,
but I can't help being distressed by pagan rituals.
The lanterns are for the dead,
to guide them back to their world for another year.
Mary.
You should have let me know you were coming.
I hoped you'd be here.
Thank you for bringing me to Tokyo.
It was the right thing to do.
Now...
He's hardly ever seen a man.
What is this'?
He sleeps in it.
Misao San'?
I don't like to see this.
When he learns to crawl, I...
I thought it might reduce the risk of accidents.
I don't want my son in a cage.
I see.
And now...
...will you leave us alone for a while?
All right.
If that's what you want.
It is.
His name is Taro.
What?
Taro is the name I've chosen for him.
Ah!
He looks almost Japanese.
- Almost? - Yes.
I'd say he looked entirely Japanese.
Would you?
Would you say that?
I worried about you all the time while the war was on.
If the death is an honorable death, there is nothing to fear.
We find it hard to think in those terms.
And yet you Christians believe in the life after death.
Not for non-Christians.
In Mukden, everyone said you had no chance of winning the war.
It was good that we won, of course.
But I am a little afraid. The army, the navy.
I think now they may be given too much power.
I would have thought you might have welcomed that.
No.
The army should serve the state,
not control it.
Leave it.
- No, I must. - Misao will go.
You must not think you are the only one who can help the boy.
I'm his mother!
Oh, yes.
You know I can never another child?
The doctor told me.
Did he'?
Of course.
I know you have...
other children.
I am very sorry.
Believe me.
And now...
...come.
Again.
Good God! Where did they excavate these from'?
My dear, these are the last word in fashion.
These are about 20 years out of date.
I know I'm going to have to send off to New York in the end.
I'm sorry, this is an absolute waste of time.
No.
No, this is fascinating.
How does your wife feel? about this arrangement?
There are things in Japan which, as a rule, are not discussed.
In Britain also.
But then this a state of affairs that has no...
official equivalent in Britain.
Europeans,
if I understand correctly,
find it very difficult simply to accept.
Always questions. Isn't that right'?
Here, what has to be is not questioned.
I see.
I find it difficult not to know when to expect you.
I come when I can.
It's just something I haven't quite learned to...
accept.
You should live in the present.
Don't think of the past or worry for the future.
Live the moment.
At least when you're not here,
I have Taro.
There are still many things in this country you have not understood.
Sometimes hard decisions you may never understand...
or forgive.
Do you have to go?
Yes.
Go back to sleep.
When will I see you again?
No...
I must go away for a time to Korea.
For how long?
I don't know.
But I will try to visit again before I leave.
Yes.
Do try.
Good bye.
Oh.
No!
Let me have that. You'll only lose it.
Misao San.
What's she done to my baby?
Misao!
Misao San!
- She's away in Osaka. - Then we must send for Count Kurihama.
- It is too late in the night. - It doesn't matter!
It's very late. Let me give you something to help you sleep.
- What are you doing here? - Fukuda San told me. You must be calm.
Calm?!
Where's my baby?!!
Come inside. I'll help you to explain everything to the police.
Please sit down.
Well'?
Sir Claude regrets he is unable to see you.
He's receiving a trade delegation.
Is there no way you can help?
If, in fact, a crime has been committed, the matter is in the hands of the police.
If, on the other hand, the child has been removed by its father...
...the matter is completely outside our jurisdiction.
And, on the face of it,
the father would seem to be completely within his legal rights.
You mean...
...he's allowed to steal my baby?
If it is his child,
under Japanese law he has absolute authority to do so.
Is that all you're going to say?
I think we should leave, Mary.
You aren't going to give me any help at all.
I really am most sympathetic.
No, you're not.
You're a mealy-mouthed coward!
Come along, Mary.
I think you ought to come and stay with me for a few days.
No!
Suppose they bring him back.
Sir Claude.
Who is it?
I don't know if you remember me.
Mary Collingsworth.
Ah, Mrs. Collingsworth.
Yes. Yes, of course.
Sorry to approach you like this. I...
I couldn't think how else to get to speak to you.
Through the usual channels, I imagine.
This is too urgent for the usual channels.
My baby's been kidnapped.
I do know something of the circumstances of this.
I'm not sure "kidnapped" is the appropriate term.
It's what's happened.
I understand there's a possibility that the child might simply have been...
reclaimed by its father.
- And they tell me that's not against the law. - There really is nothing to be done.
Indeed, if you were to succeed in finding him and took him back,
then you would be committing an offence.
A crime, if you attempted to take him out of the country.
But he's my baby!
What can I do?
Isn't that a question you should have? asked yourself last year in Manchuria?
What's the use of saying a thing like that?
You want me to regret having my child?
The only thing loan advise is that you apply to the Consul for repatriation.
I don't say it will automatically be granted.
But I think I can undertake to ease the way for you.
How can I leave this country, when I know my child is somewhere in it?
I don't believe there's anything else I can do to help.
You really have been a great disappointment to me, Mrs. Collingsworth.
Where is he'?
Where's my child?
What have you done with him'?!!
Where's my baby?!!
Where is he'?!!
You see, it's considered much better for a child to be brought up as...
what we call a Yoshi, an adopted son in a good family,
than to be brought up by a single woman.
The system works like this. The boy goes into a family where there is no son.
If there's a daughter, he will eventually marry her.
There are many, many families who would be more than happy to adopt a Kurihama.
If he had been white, or a girl, of course...
...they would have let you keep the child.
So...
...when can I see him'?
It's not usual for the child to maintain any Contact with his natural parents.
You must ask Kurihama.
He's in Korea,
and I don't suppose I'll ever see him again.
Any more than I'll see Taro...
...or whatever they decide to call him.
Are you sure this is wise'?
I thought you were in favor of female emancipation.
- Yes, but to come here. - I can't stay in that house!
I suppose I can understand that.
And I'm not going to accept any more of his money.
- Then how will you live? - I don't know!
But surely, we can think of something.
コツ:単語をクリックしてすぐ意味を調べられます!

読み込み中…

The Ginger Tree -- Episode 2

76 タグ追加 保存
Amy.Lin 2019 年 6 月 15 日 に公開
お勧め動画
  1. 1. クリック一つで単語を検索

    右側のスプリクトの単語をクリックするだけで即座に意味が検索できます。

  2. 2. リピート機能

    クリックするだけで同じフレーズを何回もリピート可能!

  3. 3. ショートカット

    キーボードショートカットを使うことによって勉強の効率を上げることが出来ます。

  4. 4. 字幕の表示/非表示

    日・英のボタンをクリックすることで自由に字幕のオンオフを切り替えられます。

  5. 5. 動画をブログ等でシェア

    コードを貼り付けてVoiceTubeの動画再生プレーヤーをブログ等でシェアすることが出来ます!

  6. 6. 全画面再生

    左側の矢印をクリックすることで全画面で再生できるようになります。

  1. クイズ付き動画

    リスニングクイズに挑戦!

  1. クリックしてメモを表示

  1. UrbanDictionary 俚語字典整合查詢。一般字典查詢不到你滿意的解譯,不妨使用「俚語字典」,或許會讓你有滿意的答案喔