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  • CARL AZUZ: The same week that the United Kingdom

  • was originally scheduled to leave the European Union,

  • British lawmakers have voted to take control of that process

  • from their prime minister.

  • And the questions hanging in the air just got bigger.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • This is "CNN 10."

  • In 2016, British voters chose to leave

  • the European Union, an economic and political

  • union of 28 countries.

  • No one's ever left it before.

  • The complicated part was determining how

  • Britain would separate itself.

  • How would its laws be affected?

  • What would its trade deals look like?

  • What about immigration and people from other countries

  • currently living in Britain?

  • The government of British Prime Minister Theresa May

  • had been negotiating these terms with the European Union.

  • Their original deadline to get this done was March 29.

  • And they reached a deal.

  • But Britain's Parliament needs to approve that deal

  • before it's completed.

  • And so far, lawmakers have rejected it twice.

  • Last week, the European Union agreed to delay the deadline

  • for Britain to leave.

  • And this week, British lawmakers voted 329 to 302

  • to take control of the parliamentary timetable

  • from the government.

  • It's the first time in more than 100 years that's happened.

  • And it means that Parliament, not the government

  • of Prime Minister May, is temporarily in control

  • of the Brexit process.

  • So what now?

  • The basic options lawmakers have are the same.

  • They can try to delay the Brexit process further.

  • They could allow Britain to leave the European

  • Union without a deal, which could temporarily

  • hurt Britain's economy.

  • Or they could keep working on a deal with the European Union,

  • though the EU may not agree to a different plan.

  • Meanwhile, the prime minister can try a third time

  • to get her deal passed.

  • As Parliament grapples with Brexit,

  • some British businesses are in a holding pattern.

  • ISA SOARES: Recent winter months would typically

  • see a decline in business for this cold storage

  • hub outside of London.

  • DANISHA JAGATIA: As you can see, we

  • have reached maximum capacity.

  • ISA SOARES: But this year has proved very different.

  • DANISHA JAGATIA: A lot of our existing clients

  • are panicking due to the uncertainty around Brexit,

  • and therefore, stockpiling and getting goods shipped in to us

  • in larger bulks and quantities.

  • ISA SOARES: This site stores produce

  • for a range of clientele, from manufacturers and restaurants

  • to caterers and small businesses.

  • And there's space here for over 2,000 pallets of frozen goods,

  • items such as bread, chicken breasts, as well as ice cream.

  • But fully stocked shelves present an unwelcome problem

  • in this industry.

  • DANISHA JAGATIA: We've had quite a few new inquiries

  • over the last couple of months.

  • It's bad for business.

  • Because in an ideal world, you don't want to have to be

  • turning away any business.

  • ISA SOARES: Threats of leaving the EU without a deal

  • or with a bad one have created a safety first approach

  • for many retailers across the UK, who fear trade disruptions.

  • Those with enough resources are stocking

  • up while they have the chance.

  • FRASER MCKEVITT: We know that retailers

  • are taking a number of steps.

  • They've been looking to hire extra staff working

  • in their customs units to help to get

  • things through the borders if there should be any delays.

  • They've also been looking at what they stock.

  • Is there a chance, perhaps, to source

  • things locally from the UK?

  • Everybody wants to do that.

  • And of course, it's a great marketing tool

  • to talk about locally grown produce

  • and British produce to British consumers.

  • But the simple fact is, Britain only produces half of the food

  • that it actually eats.

  • ISA SOARES: The government has so far reassured the public

  • that food supply, irrespective of Brexit,

  • will remain unchanged.

  • A spokesperson for the Department

  • for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs said this to CNN.

  • "The UK has a high degree of food security built on access

  • to a diverse range of sources, including

  • strong domestic production and imports from third countries.

  • This will continue to be the case as we leave the EU."

  • They added, "While we are making sensible preparations

  • for all eventualities as we leave the EU,

  • the government is not and will not be storing food."

  • FRASER MCKEVITT: We do know that 10% of consumers

  • have said that they are already stockpiling goods.

  • But another 25% of consumers have said they

  • would consider stockpiling.

  • ISA SOARES: And as Brexit uncertainty continues

  • to fester, businesses and consumers must now choose how

  • best to fill their freezers.

  • Isa Soares, CNN, London.

  • CARL AZUZ: Next up, after 50 years of sending rockets

  • and satellites and humans into space, we've left a lot of junk

  • up there.

  • And it's becoming a bigger problem with every launch.

  • 10 years ago, two satellites collided,

  • adding to the millions of pieces of debris

  • that's orbiting the Earth.

  • If more collisions happen, millions of people

  • could lose their internet or phone service.

  • Satellite TV could be taken out.

  • GPS service could be lost.

  • With thousands of new satellites being planned for the years

  • ahead, some companies, like OneWeb,

  • are taking steps toward retrieving defunct satellites

  • or leaving enough fuel in them to ensure they head back

  • into Earth's atmosphere to burn up once their missions are

  • completed.

  • The company says this is expensive.

  • And though NASA recommends that every space company comes up

  • with a way to remove its products

  • once they're done working, it doesn't punish those who don't.

  • So what the risk is coming down to

  • is whether enough is done to keep

  • space clean as people and businesses

  • continue to explore it.

  • 10-second trivia.

  • Which of these events took place in 1992?

  • Lillehammer Winter Olympics, Barcelona Summer Olympics,

  • election of George HW Bush, or the launch

  • of the Hubble Telescope?

  • In the summer of 1992, the Olympic games

  • were held in Barcelona, Spain.

  • And it makes sense that the daughter

  • of a woman who competed in those Olympics

  • would also be a competitive athlete.

  • But what makes Carmen Alder a positive athlete,

  • in our ongoing series, is how she's set an example for others

  • on the track in America and in her mother's home country.

  • You can nominate a positive athlete you know

  • at CNN.com/positiveathlete.

  • CARMEN ALDER: I had tried a bunch of sports before running.

  • None of the sports really stuck like running.

  • Once I tried, I was like, oh, yeah, I'm good at this.

  • JOHN BUCHHOLZ: In her four semesters

  • in high school so far, she has won five state titles.

  • She is a coach's dream.

  • She cares just so much about her teammates.

  • It's really not about her.

  • CARMEN ALDER: I remember growing up watching my mom.

  • You know, she'd go out and train and run.

  • And you know, I kind of wanted to be like my mom.

  • JANETH ALDER: When I was 14, I ran for Ecuador.

  • And then I made it to the Olympics, to Barcelona in '92.

  • And eventually, that's what brought

  • me to the United States.

  • I became a coach because we didn't find any distance coach.

  • And we started the Youth Club.

  • And then last summer, we went to Ecuador.

  • I took my girls to train there.

  • We did a clinic.

  • We saw that there was a lot of kids there

  • that were interested in running too.

  • CARMEN ALDER: My mom owns some land.

  • And the whole summer, she was like, OK, guys,

  • we're going to go run in, like, altitude.

  • And she was like hyping us up.

  • And so we got this group of kids.

  • And we all drove up in this bus.

  • And we started running.

  • And we finally did six miles.

  • And then after that, we were all-- like, all of us

  • were, like, so tired.

  • Like, oh, my gosh.

  • That was really fun just to see how many kids there were,

  • like, who were willing to come on a Saturday,

  • all the way up there, in the cold, and run together.

  • That was a special experience.

  • JANETH ALDER: I think it was really good and really

  • uplifting for her to see all the kids that, you know,

  • trying to do the same things that she's doing.

  • And I think, for her, also, saw how fortunate she

  • is to have the opportunities that she

  • has here that most of those kids there, they don't have it.

  • CARMEN ALDER: One of the main goals

  • is to help them get scholarships.

  • 'Cause through that, you know, you

  • open so many more opportunities, like, so many jobs

  • that they want to do.

  • And I think that education is really important.

  • And most kids there probably don't

  • have the money needed to you get you

  • know, the degrees they want.

  • And you know, if running can open up that door for them,

  • then I think-- you know, I'm all for it.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: For 10 out of 10, it's "Alien," the play.

  • Drama students at a New Jersey high school

  • recently took a horror classic from 1979, adapted a script,

  • and put it on stage.

  • It was a budget production.

  • One senior said the crew used whatever

  • cardboard and scrap metal was lying around to build the set.

  • But it was pretty convincing.

  • The production went viral after viewers

  • posted clips on social media.

  • And the local mayor's office has funded an encore.

  • Now, you might be asking, what happened to "Our Town."

  • What kind of "Midsummer Night's Dream"

  • led those students to "Shrek" tradition, not

  • go "Into the Woods," leave "Alice in Wonderland,"

  • and take on "A Crucible" that makes "Beauty and the Beast"

  • look like "The Little Mermaid"?

  • maybe this December, they'll sing "A Christmas Carol."

  • But for now, their "Little Shop of Horrors"

  • has them "Mary Poppins" on social media.

  • I'm Carl Azuz, taking a bow, on "CNN 10."

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

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CNN10】2019年3月27日 ([CNN 10] March 27, 2019)

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