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  • CARL AZUZ: Fridays are heroic, at least when we have a new CNN

  • Heroes report coming up.

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN 10.

  • Thank you for spending part of your day with us.

  • Experts say there's been some activity around a North Korean

  • missile facility.

  • And the reason they're concerned is because North Korea

  • hasn't tested any missiles or nuclear weapons

  • in more than a year.

  • Could this be a sign the country is going

  • to resume doing something that the US

  • wants it to give up altogether?

  • Late last month in Hanoi, Vietnam,

  • the two countries' leaders met face

  • to face for the second time.

  • They didn't reach an agreement.

  • North Korea didn't commit to getting

  • rid of its nuclear and missile programs,

  • a priority for the US.

  • And America didn't commit to removing its sanctions,

  • its penalties on North Korea's economy,

  • a priority for North Korea.

  • Still, US President Donald Trump said he and North Korean leader

  • Kim Jong-un left the summit on friendly terms

  • and that the door to continued discussions would stay open.

  • That's why possible activity at this missile site

  • is significant.

  • President Trump's national security advisor

  • says he expects North Korea to show whether it's

  • serious about future talks with the US

  • and whether the communist country is committed

  • to giving up its nuclear program and everything that

  • goes with it.

  • If it's not, President Trump does not plan to remove

  • any sanctions on North Korea.

  • The US may even add more.

  • So the future of US and North Korean relations

  • could depend on whether North Korea is using this missile

  • site to carry out more tests.

  • PAULA HANCOCKS: This is a key site that North Korea was

  • in the process of dismantling.

  • And it now appears as though it is reassembling

  • some of the elements there.

  • It is commercially-available satellite

  • imagery that has been analyzed by two

  • groups, 38 North and also CSIS.

  • And they both believe that it does

  • show reassembling certain elements of Tongchang-ri.

  • It's also been backed up by what we've

  • heard from the NIS, the intelligence agency

  • here in South Korea.

  • They say that they have seen that there

  • has been activity there.

  • They say that there are construction cranes.

  • They've seen vehicles in the area.

  • A roof has been put over one of the structures, a door as well.

  • So of course, the question is, why is this happening now?

  • Up until now, we had heard that North

  • Korea was dismantling this.

  • He had talked to the South Korean President Moon Jae-in

  • about this when Kim Jong-un actually met him in Pyongyang.

  • They were discussing this.

  • It was part of their statement at the end of that meeting,

  • even thinking about when they could bring

  • independent inspectors into North Korea

  • to prove that this site had been put out of action.

  • Now the date is key.

  • What we know from 38 North is that these satellite

  • images are from between February 16 and March the 2nd.

  • So it could have been before, during,

  • or after the Hanoi Summit.

  • So many analysts are reticent to say definitively

  • that this shows that North Korea is not happy, that there was

  • nothing at the end of that summit,

  • that there was no agreement between US President

  • Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un.

  • But clearly, they all agree that this

  • is not a positive development.

  • Paula Hancocks, CNN, Seoul.

  • CARL AZUZ: Well, here's a party picture

  • that looks kind of like postmodern art

  • meets jet planes, except it's real, sort of.

  • This is a depiction of supersonic jets

  • breaking the sound barrier.

  • To create the image, NASA used advanced photo technology,

  • the kind it says allowed researchers

  • to visualize the sound waves around the aircraft.

  • How did they get the shot?

  • A plane with a special imaging system

  • flew directly above two T-38 jets.

  • And at the very moment they broke the sound barrier,

  • it took the picture.

  • OK, kind of cool, but so what?

  • Well, NASA says this is the first time that's ever

  • been done, that it will help scientists better understand

  • shockwaves, and that it could possibly help future jets be

  • designed to break the sound barrier without creating

  • the loud sonic boom.

  • 10-second trivia.

  • Which of these video game systems

  • was released the most recently?

  • Sega Genesis, Super Nintendo, Game Boy, or Commodore 64?

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • The Super Nintendo made it to US debut

  • in 1991, making it the last system

  • on this list to be released.

  • There's a new CNN Hero we're introducing today.

  • His name is Zach Wigal.

  • He says that when he was in first or second grade,

  • he got a Super Nintendo.

  • And he jokes that from his parent's perspective,

  • it was all downhill from there.

  • But as he got older, Zach found a way

  • to use video games to connect with

  • and help children in hospitals.

  • That was the beginning of Gamers Outreach.

  • ZACH WIGAL: I always felt like there

  • were these negative stereotypes around games

  • and gaming culture.

  • - Suiting up.

  • ZACH WIGAL: Sometimes people believe

  • that video games are corrupting the minds of America's youth.

  • So I kind of feel more like a rebel than a do-gooder.

  • So Grant, do you have a list of favorite video games?

  • - I usually play the Lego e-games.

  • ZACH WIGAL: The Lego games?

  • Video games are an incredible tool

  • for helping kids find a source of fun and relief

  • during stressful and difficult times.

  • - Yes, I'm the Hulk.

  • Oh.

  • That was sweet.

  • - Sick dodge.

  • ZACH WIGAL: We wanted to create sort of a portable video game

  • kiosk that the health care staff could use to make sure games

  • were easy to move around.

  • We started calling these things go carts.

  • So the go cart's loaded up right now.

  • Each unit is equipped with a console,

  • a monitor, an assortment of games, controllers.

  • And they actually also move up and down.

  • - It's time for the next chapter.

  • Ready to play?

  • - If they're intimidated by any kind of bandages that they have

  • or any poles that might be attached to them,

  • they forget about that.

  • And they just focus on the game.

  • And then they start talking to each other.

  • - You can press B, and it does like a secret move

  • or something.

  • - I think I used it to smash the big laser just then.

  • - Yeah, you did.

  • ZACH WIGAL: We started recruiting

  • video game enthusiasts to actually come

  • into the hospital environment.

  • So they'll play games with kids.

  • They help solve minor tech support issues.

  • - You want to do some virtual reality today?

  • - The kind of disease I have is a pediatric cancer.

  • It's going on three years that I've been a patient.

  • I started off with doing chemo, and then chemo with an antibody

  • therapy, surgery, and then a bone marrow transplant,

  • and then radiation twice.

  • - Hey, what's up?

  • - Hey, what's up, Blake?

  • How's it going?

  • - Oh, you guys just started.

  • Is this the Avengers one?

  • - To people who think that games are just games,

  • there is so much more than that.

  • [INTERPOSING VOICES]

  • We don't have to talk about me being sick.

  • We can play the game, because that's

  • way more cool than having to talk about being sick.

  • - You rescued the cat.

  • - I'm hooked.

  • - We've seen anxiety go down.

  • Prescription painkillers are being used less.

  • Even doctors are sometimes now prescribing

  • video game time, part of the patient's treatment.

  • - We defeated him.

  • - Got it.

  • Teamwork.

  • ZACH WIGAL: We literally started the organization

  • in my parents' basement.

  • We never really envisioned this becoming a nationwide program

  • or even a global program.

  • But as soon as we delivered this unit, they loved it.

  • And it led to us getting requests to build more.

  • We're in about 50 facilities nationwide.

  • Nice.

  • That's all you.

  • You had talked to me a decade ago,

  • I don't think I would have ever seen myself

  • building video game carts.

  • Maybe that's part of the story.

  • There is no sort of perfect ideal person to be doing this.

  • I think anytime you can give back,

  • it's just refreshing for your soul.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: For today's 10 out of 10 segment,

  • we're taking you to Snow Maze.

  • But Carl, don't you mean Snowmass?

  • No, I mean this, what Guinness World Records says

  • is the largest snow maze on Earth.

  • It sits on a cornfield in Manitoba, Canada.

  • Its walls are six and 1/2 feet tall and two feet thick.

  • And they're made of artificial snow, which is apparently

  • stronger than the real thing.

  • It took a farmer and his staff six weeks and more than $42,000

  • to put it together.

  • A corn maze is a maize maze, but a snow maze is hazier.

  • You can't be any lazier or make the maze less mazier.

  • It takes amazing skill for the design and the solution,

  • building passageways and ways to pass perfunctory occlusions.

  • Some will think you're lost, because to them it makes

  • no sense for you to drop a huge expense

  • upon some snowbound labyrinths.

  • But if you have the maze and means, then by all

  • means let them in so they can be about finding ways out

  • if they don't hit dead ends.

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN.

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CNN 10|CNN学生ニュース|2019年3月8日 (CNN 10 | CNN Student News | March 8 2019)

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    Yukiko に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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