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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: "CNN 10" is taking you from the Middle East

  • to South America today, and exploring

  • subjects from international relations to gold mining.

  • I'm Carl Azuz at the CNN Center.

  • Thank you for starting off your week with us.

  • The first story concerns Iran, a nation that

  • was known as Persia until 1979.

  • It used to be a monarchy governed

  • by a Shah, a Persian King.

  • But 40 years ago, that Shah was overthrown

  • and forced into exile.

  • And as a result of the Iranian revolution,

  • the nation became a theocratic republic with Islam

  • as its official religion.

  • One major reason why Iran has been a rival of the United

  • States since around that time is because the US supported

  • the Shah who was overthrown.

  • But there are other reasons, including the fact

  • that the US, the United Nations, and the European Union

  • say Iran is an official sponsor of terrorism.

  • That's why they've imposed sanctions

  • or penalties on Iran's economy.

  • As the Middle Eastern country celebrates a revolution

  • milestone this year, its military

  • is showing off a new ballistic missile,

  • a weapon that is said to be capable of traveling

  • more than 600 miles.

  • An Iranian military official called the missile's

  • development an achievement.

  • But the country's missile program concerns other nations

  • around the world, including the US,

  • because Iran's supreme leader has

  • called for the destruction of Israel,

  • a US ally in the region.

  • [PROTESTERS CHANTING]

  • FREDERIK PLEITGEN: The return from exile of Ayatollah

  • Khomeini in February, 1979, and the overthrow

  • of the US-backed Shah marked the culmination

  • of the Islamic Revolution.

  • Businessman Abdul Kassem Shafei says he organized opposition

  • groups in those days.

  • 40 years later, he believes the revolution

  • produced mixed results.

  • ABDUL KASSEM SHAFEI: [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]

  • FREDERIK PLEITGEN: Religiously and ideologically,

  • the revolution achieved its goals, he says.

  • But economically, due to sanctions

  • and domestic mismanagement, we have

  • not yet reached those goals.

  • [PROTESTERS CHANTING]

  • The Islamic Revolution also an uprising against America's

  • support for the Shah.

  • In late 1979, Iranian students stormed the US embassy

  • in Tehran, capturing and holding hostage more than 50 Americans

  • from more than 400 days.

  • [PROTESTERS CHANTING]

  • US-Iranian relations have never recovered.

  • Hardliners still chanting death to America at Friday prayers,

  • even though Iran's supreme leader recently tried

  • to tone down the rhetoric.

  • ALI KHAMENEI: [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]

  • FREDERIK PLEITGEN: Let me make something clear for US leaders,

  • he said.

  • Death to America means death to American rulers.

  • We have no problems with the American people.

  • The Trump White House is cracking down on Iran,

  • pulling the US out of a nuclear deal signed by the Obama

  • administration, and hitting the country with sanctions

  • that are crippling its economy, and causing

  • its currency to plummet.

  • The US says Iran is a threat to Israel

  • and America's allies in the Middle East,

  • and lashed out at Iran's ballistic missile program.

  • Iran's answer-- a defense expo praising the rockets.

  • Iran shows no signs of bowing to American

  • and international pressure.

  • The country says it will continue

  • to develop its ballistic missile program, which it says

  • is solely for defense purposes.

  • For the first time, Iran recently

  • released video of one of its underground missile

  • assembly facilities.

  • 40 years after the beginning of the Islamic Revolution,

  • the confrontation between the US and Iran continues.

  • Fred Pleitgen, CNN, Tehran.

  • CARL AZUZ: Second stop this Tuesday is in South America.

  • We've told you how a collapsing economy is leaving many people

  • in Venezuela hungry and unable to get

  • the hygienic and medical supplies they need.

  • Well, help is flowing to Venezuela

  • from nations around the world.

  • But some of it at least has been stopped at the country's

  • western border with Colombia.

  • Beginning last Friday, two truckloads of food and medicine

  • from the United States were prevented from rolling

  • onto Venezuelan soil.

  • The country's president, Nicolas Maduro, said, quote,

  • "we are not beggars."

  • And he added that the humanitarian aid

  • is intended to humiliate Venezuela and justify

  • military aggression.

  • Analysts say it's possible that the government's afraid

  • that the supplies could be used as a cover

  • for an invasion of Venezuela.

  • But Juan Guaido, who declared himself

  • the new Venezuelan president in January,

  • said the aid would be let in, because it's about saving

  • lives, and that the officials who block it

  • are keeping medicines and food from people in need.

  • As inflation in Venezuela spins out of control, with prices

  • for everyday items soaring beyond what residents can pay,

  • countries like Canada and Germany

  • have pledged millions of dollars to help.

  • What's unclear is whether the Maduro

  • administration will accept it.

  • 10 second trivia!

  • Which of these countries uses a currency

  • called the nuevo sol, Chile, Peru, Argentina, or Brazil?

  • The nuevo sol is the currency in the South

  • American nation of Peru.

  • The nuevo sol has also been a relatively stable currency

  • over the past 10 years.

  • It's a reflection of Peru's strong economy, one

  • of the best in Latin America.

  • But though the country's poverty rate

  • has decreased substantially, it's still around 22%,

  • meaning over a fifth of the nation's 31 million people

  • live below the poverty line.

  • That's part of the reason why illegal gold mining has

  • skyrocketed Peru is a major producer of gold,

  • and a lot of the mining there is allowed by the government.

  • But the kind that's not allowed takes only a few hours

  • for someone to learn how to do.

  • It can bring them cash quickly.

  • It's made gold Peru's most valuable illegal export,

  • and the rainforest is paying the price.

  • BILL WEIR: Their illicit two-wheeled taxi

  • service is known as Los Tigres.

  • My driver, one of the thousands of young men

  • who have come from all over Peru,

  • lured by an operation that could net $100 a day

  • or get them killed.

  • We ride for 20 minutes before the lush green begins to thin.

  • The jungle floor turns to sand.

  • A half mile further, and the rainforest is gone.

  • It's like we've entered a completely different ecosystem.

  • From jungle the desert in a matter of feet.

  • - Oh, this didn't exist.

  • These lakes didn't exist.

  • Nothing did, it was just flat forest that we went through.

  • This is all man-made.

  • BILL WEIR: Wow, oh my god!

  • Oh my god!

  • And these are all toxic pools now?

  • - This is all mining pits that are filled in after it's

  • been abandoned with rainwater.

  • BILL WEIR: They use an old, brutal method,

  • merciless on the land, cutting down trees,

  • blasting river banks with diesel-powered firehoses,

  • creating a slurry that gets sifted until--

  • eureka-- a tiny flake of gold.

  • Since this land only holds two grams of precious metal

  • per ton of mud, mercury is needed to pull

  • the gold from the sludge.

  • And what effect does that mercury

  • have on the living things here, including the people?

  • - Well, it's magic for the mining process,

  • but it's poison for everything else.

  • [GUITAR RIFF]

  • CARL AZUZ: The Kentucky Derby is said

  • to be the oldest continuously held

  • major sporting event in the US.

  • The first race was run in 1875.

  • For the second-oldest sporting event,

  • you have to trade in your horse for a dog.

  • CNN recently visited the Westminster Kennel

  • Club dog show, which started over the weekend

  • in New York City.

  • [DOG BARKING]

  • - Every February, the dogs descend upon Manhattan,

  • and it's for the 142nd annual Westminster

  • Kennel Club dog show.

  • We have over 3,200 dogs coming this year.

  • - This is the meet the breeds.

  • - His name is Teddy.

  • - This is Papa Chew Dallas.

  • - This is a fun time, you know, just to get out and teach

  • people about the breed.

  • - And I really like learning about different breeds of dogs.

  • - We have a boxer kissing booth, because why not?

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • There you go!

  • [DOG BARKING]

  • - You have the fifth annual Masters

  • Agility Championship going on.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • - This is my first time I ever been.

  • - Yes, Curly, go, go, go, go, go, go!

  • - I've been watching them on TV.

  • And it's just so exciting to see it in person.

  • [CHEERING]

  • - This show is the second-longest

  • continuously held sporting event in the United States.

  • And the reason it's been able to maintain that

  • is the fact that it's about dogs.

  • - I mean, man's best friend.

  • What can't you not like about them?

  • CARL AZUZ: So who will win Best in Show?

  • Will a Doberman pinsch the lead?

  • Will judges be brought to their Pyrenees?

  • Are spotted dogs worth a dalmention,

  • or does it take a toy to Chihuawalk away with victory?

  • You can greyhound us about this all you want,

  • but if you're wondering Weimeraren't we telling you,

  • it's because results haven't been pointed out yet.

  • Those will be settled on Tuesday.

  • Just didn't want you to think we were

  • being Malamute on the subject.

  • I'm Corgill Azuz, and we'll springer back with more for you

  • tomorrow.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

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CNN10】2019年2月11日 ([CNN 10] February 11, 2019)

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