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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: From Australia to America,

  • we're traveling the globe to get you up to speed on news.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • This is CNN 10.

  • We're happy to have you watching.

  • While parts of the United States were shivering

  • under record cold temperatures last week,

  • Australia, both of its territories, and all six

  • of its states, were sweltering under a record heat wave.

  • And in the northeastern state of Queensland,

  • days of intense rainfall have caused the kind

  • of flooding that officials say happens

  • only once every 100 years.

  • Townsville is a city on Australia's northeast coast.

  • More than 190,000 people live here.

  • Its city council says it gets more than 300 days of sunshine

  • every year.

  • But the massive downpours that have hit Townsville recently

  • have put a major strain on a nearby dam.

  • On Sunday night, the Ross River Dam was at about 250%

  • of its capacity, and its floodgates

  • had to be opened to prevent the structure from collapsing.

  • Australian officials warned people in Townsville

  • that historic flooding would happen as a result.

  • And some residents who reportedly thought they'd be OK

  • have had to climb to their roofs for safety.

  • And it's not just the flood waters that are dangerous.

  • 9News reports that there have been several sightings

  • of crocodiles and snakes that have been

  • carried along in the floods.

  • And while you're about to get a sense

  • of the ongoing rescue effort, relief from the rain

  • is nowhere in sight.

  • A CNN meteorologist predicted that Townsville would

  • receive another 4 inches on Monday,

  • and 2 to 3 inches on Tuesday.

  • Entire neighborhoods are underwater,

  • and thousands of homes were in danger of flooding

  • and strong winds that are in the forecast.

  • For thousands of residents of Townsville,

  • it has been a long day and plenty more to come.

  • I'm standing here at the Ross River.

  • Right now at Rosslea is where the water is coming

  • from the river, which has made its way down

  • the dam at a rapid pace, heading right across.

  • You see when we have a look at the water how fast it is still

  • moving, and making its way right into the suburb of Rosslea,

  • which locals are considering to be ground zero in what

  • has been this flood emergency.

  • On the other side of where I'm standing

  • is a suburb of Annandale, where a number

  • of properties, as you see, are completely

  • inundated on the ground floor.

  • We've seen helicopters that are constantly

  • checking for people who are there,

  • trying to pluck them to safety.

  • We also know the swift water rescue

  • teams have been out and about.

  • So far at least a dozen rescues, probably

  • even more overnight as well.

  • So a huge effort right across Townsville.

  • This all started last night, of course.

  • The rain has been building up for days.

  • But the Ross River Dam, about 10 kilometers as the crow

  • flies from where I'm standing at the moment,

  • it opened automatically.

  • The dam gates opened because it reached about 43 meters.

  • At that stage, it's built into the dam

  • that it needed to open up to let out some of that water

  • to maintain the integrity of the dam.

  • As that happened, the velocity of the water,

  • 2,000 cubic meters per second, was released.

  • It's headed straight down the river, trying to find its way

  • to the ocean, cutting a straight line through suburbs

  • like this one in Rosslea.

  • Now, the Queensland Premier defending the actions

  • of all emergency services in saying it's

  • a tough time for those people living in Townsville.

  • CARL AZUZ: The US President's annual State of the Union

  • address is Tuesday.

  • It had originally been scheduled for last Tuesday,

  • but it was postponed because of the US

  • government's partial shutdown.

  • When that ended late last month, the address was rescheduled.

  • One issue that President Donald Trump is expected to address

  • is the major reason for the shutdown, security at America's

  • southern border with Mexico.

  • The Pentagon announced this week that an additional 3,750

  • American troops would be deployed to the border.

  • Their mission, to give extra support to US Customs

  • and Border Protection agents.

  • This could include assignments like installing wire fencing,

  • and watching for illegal crossings.

  • The deployment would bring the total number of US

  • military forces there to 4,350.

  • And the new mission is scheduled to last for three months.

  • President Trump says this is necessary to stop

  • large caravans of people who are headed to the border

  • with the goal of entering the US illegally.

  • But US representative Adam Smith,

  • a Democrat from Washington and the chairman of the House Armed

  • Services Committee, questioned what the additional troops

  • would be doing at the border, and suggested the increase

  • could be unjustified.

  • On Wednesday's show we plan to bring you some highlights

  • of the Republican president's speech and the Democratic

  • Party's response.

  • You'll find it right here at CNN10.com.

  • 10 second trivia.

  • American inventor Philo Farnsworth is best known

  • for his development of what?

  • Telegraph, telephone, television, or telescope.

  • In the late 1920s, Farnsworth demonstrated

  • his invention of the electronic television system.

  • A famous story about Philo Farnsworth

  • is that he grew up in a house that didn't have electricity

  • until he was a teenager.

  • So going from that to presenting the first electronic TV

  • within a few years, well, it shows how Farnsworth

  • had chosen the right field.

  • Of course, the TV itself has changed a lot over the decades.

  • But it's still a fixture in roughly 95% of American homes,

  • and a growing number of the ones that

  • don't have TV's are still watching programs

  • on other kinds of screens.

  • Will this screen itself eventually become obsolete?

  • RACHEL CRANE: So we're surrounded by screens.

  • They're how we entertain ourselves.

  • But how we'll watch them, the form factor is changing, too.

  • The size, the shape, and even the idea of needing

  • a screen at all is evolving.

  • JESSE SCHELL: I think one of the big changes we're just going

  • to see over the next decade is that we're

  • going to start to have intelligent conversations

  • with inanimate objects.

  • RACHEL CRANE: Is it going to be on a gaming console?

  • Is it going to be in everything?

  • JESSE SCHELL: It's going to be in everything.

  • RACHEL CRANE: Keecker, a French startup,

  • thinks your future entertainment system will look like this.

  • It's a projector, sound system, and security

  • system rolled into one.

  • So Keecker's kind of like an obedient dog.

  • PIERRE LEBEAU: That's right.

  • RACHEL CRANE: But with bells and whistles.

  • PIERRE LEBEAU: Bells and whistles.

  • And it's just really useful in the sense

  • that it can be there to give you your music, your TV experience.

  • And it can be away if you don't want to see it.

  • RACHEL CRANE: Keecker is designed to do a lot,

  • but it isn't perfect yet.

  • Hey, Keecker, come to the living room.

  • Hey, Keecker, show me the weather.

  • Keecker, stop moving, please.

  • This is like a petulant version of the Amazon Echo.

  • You have to say it over and over and over.

  • But instead of Alexa, I'm saying Keecker.

  • You think there may be a day when Keecker replaces the TV.

  • PIERRE LEBEAU: I think the TV has

  • to be replaced by something, because it's just too old.

  • Like the voice assistants, it's all about learning and trying

  • to be better to serve you better, as opposed to just

  • being a blank plastic display.

  • RACHEL CRANE: Turning TVs into something

  • more than just a black box is a challenge lots of companies

  • are tackling.

  • Some are making screens more flexible,

  • or getting rid of them entirely.

  • Others are designing screens to blend in.

  • This isn't a painting behind me.

  • It's actually a TV.

  • It's called The Frame, and it's made by Samsung.

  • Now, when the TV is off, Samsung provides hundreds

  • of pieces of art that can be displayed,

  • but you can also add your own.

  • And you can even change the color of the frame itself.

  • But what if your screen could actually talk to you?

  • JESSE SCHELL: Some of the biggest advances we're going

  • to see in home entertainment are going to be virtual reality

  • headsets coming into the home.

  • They're going to make a big difference.

  • Augmented reality systems.

  • And then also artificially intelligent characters

  • that start to become part of games and other experiences.

  • RACHEL CRANE: So you would be talking then

  • to like a character in one of your games

  • about something that you're watching.

  • JESSE SCHELL: Instead of saying, hey, television, pull up

  • video number three, you can just say, oh, hey, Sidney, what do

  • you think we should watch next?

  • And then the character will have some suggestions.

  • And the two of you will have a conversation.

  • RACHEL CRANE: When do these technologies get good enough?

  • Do you foresee a day when screens

  • just completely disappear?

  • JESSE SCHELL: It's sort of like, did television kill radio?

  • I think just like AR is going to replace

  • some screen applications, screens are going

  • to survive and hang in there.

  • RACHEL CRANE: So what will we be watching in the future?

  • We're not exactly sure.

  • I guess we'll just have to stay tuned.

  • CARL AZUZ: Golden Colorado, golden retrievers.

  • Coincidence?

  • No, not at this gathering in the Centennial State.

  • It's called the Goldens in Golden Gala.

  • It was held on National Golden Retriever Day.

  • It brought together animals from all dog walks of life.

  • And it might have set a record, too.

  • There were reportedly about 1,000 golden retrievers

  • and their owners here.

  • A previous record in Scotland brought around 361 dogs.

  • So for fans of goldens, the idea was pure gold.

  • But if they can have goldens in Golden,

  • can someone host airedales in Adairville,

  • bassetts in Bassett, bostons in Boston,

  • chihuahuas in chihuahua, collies in Collieville,

  • labradors in Labrador, maltese in Malta,

  • papillons in Papillon, terriers in Terre Haute,

  • or yorkies in Yorkshire?

  • That'll give them something to yap about.

  • And it takes a bite out of another edition of CNN 10.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

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CNN10】2019年2月5日 ([CNN 10] February 5, 2019)

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