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  • [CLOCK TICKING]

  • [MUSIC - CHAOS X, "DRUNKEN EXPECTATIONS"]

  • CARL AZUZ: Hi, I'm Carl Azuz, here to deliver your Wednesday

  • edition of "CNN 10."

  • We have some award show trivia coming up in a few minutes,

  • but we're starting with a report on a second summit

  • between two rival countries.

  • There's an interesting standoff taking place

  • between North Korea and the US.

  • After meeting face-to-face for the first time

  • last summer, the two countries' leaders

  • signed an agreement to establish new relations

  • and work toward peace.

  • But since then, it's as if the two

  • sides are saying to each other, OK, you go first.

  • What do they want?

  • For North Korea, the answer is security guarantees,

  • promises from the US that it will not

  • attack the communist country.

  • It also wants the US to lift the sanctions, the penalties it

  • placed on North Korea because of its nuclear

  • and missile programs.

  • While North Korea has said its nuclear program is a right,

  • the United States and the United Nations consider it illegal.

  • And that's what the US wants, for North Korea

  • to completely give up its nuclear program

  • and never try to develop nuclear weapons.

  • When US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim

  • Jong Un held their historic meeting on June 12,

  • they both agreed to give each other what they wanted.

  • So the first step was taken.

  • But it's the next one that's been the hangup.

  • WILL RIPLEY: President Trump is obviously

  • very optimistic about the diplomatic process

  • with North Korea.

  • He even said that there's a lot of progress

  • being made behind the scenes that hasn't

  • been reported in the media.

  • But is that progress the arrangement

  • of the second summit?

  • Or is the progress actual compromise

  • on this issue of the timeline of denuclearization

  • and the lifting of sanctions?

  • Because that has been the key sticking

  • point ever since the summit in Singapore on June 12.

  • They signed a very vaguely worded agreement

  • that didn't have any specifics.

  • Kim Jong Un walked away, perhaps thinking

  • that the US was ready to lift sanctions and provide

  • economic relief right away.

  • President Trump walked away thinking that perhaps North

  • Koreans were ready to start getting rid of their nukes

  • right away.

  • Obviously, that hasn't happened.

  • Talks have broken down because of the fact that the North

  • Koreans say they need to build confidence with the US,

  • and they don't want to give up nuclear weapons

  • until they are completely sold that this process is

  • going to work out.

  • And so the big challenge now is for the US and North Korea

  • to find a way to come closer together on this issue.

  • North Korea wants incremental sanctions relief in exchange

  • for slow steps toward an eventual denuclearization

  • of the Korean peninsula.

  • They also call for corresponding measures, which may include

  • things like a reduction of troop presence,

  • American troops on the Korean peninsula,

  • or getting rid of the nuclear umbrella

  • that protects South Korea.

  • Those are some big issues that are going to be

  • quite difficult to overcome.

  • We know that there are talks happening

  • in Sweden, lower level talks.

  • The US special representative for North Korea,

  • Stephen Biegun, and Choe Son-hui,

  • the vice foreign minister--

  • those are some of the issues that they will

  • be discussing at a lower level.

  • And then, of course, the bigger picture--

  • the summit itself-- it'll be happening

  • towards the end of February.

  • That's according to the White House and President Trump.

  • He's not announcing the location yet.

  • Sources are telling me that the most

  • likely option of those that have been thrown around is Vietnam.

  • It's a country that has strong ties with both

  • the US and North Korea.

  • It's a quick trip for Kim Jong Un to go to Vietnam.

  • And Vietnam is a country that fought a war with the United

  • States, rose from the ashes, and transformed its economy,

  • an economic model that North Korea could perhaps follow

  • if they decide to open up their own economy,

  • something that Kim Jong Un has said he wants to do so.

  • So the summit is happening, but the big unanswered

  • question-- will they be able to accomplish something tangible?

  • Will they be able to walk away with an agreement that actually

  • leads to action as opposed to what happened in Singapore,

  • where there was lots of smiles, lots of photos,

  • but nothing in terms of denuclearization?

  • Will Ripley, CNN, Beijing.

  • CARL AZUZ: 10-second Trivia--

  • the name "Oscar" refers to a statuette that's

  • officially known as what?

  • Motion Picture Achievement Award,

  • Knight of Film Achievement, Academy Award of Honor,

  • or Academy Award of Merit?

  • [BEEPING]

  • Though it's better known as an "Oscar,"

  • the statuette is officially the Academy Award of Merit.

  • And more than 3,000 of them have been presented since May 16,

  • 1929, when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

  • held its first award ceremony.

  • The nominees for this year's Academy Awards, the 91st in US

  • history, were announced on Tuesday.

  • Observers say there's not a clear front runner for Best

  • Picture this time around.

  • Organizers haven't even named a host yet.

  • And ratings for the televised show

  • have been dropping in recent years.

  • But for people in the film industry,

  • an Oscar is still the pinnacle of success.

  • - In 1929, studio head Louis Mayer

  • handed out the first Academy Awards.

  • There were only 270 guests.

  • The winners had been announced months before.

  • And the whole thing only cost $5 to attend.

  • LOUIS B. MAYER: We have seen the American motion picture become

  • foremost in all the world.

  • - Fast forward 90 years.

  • And today, the Oscars are awarded

  • in a 3,300-seat theater.

  • Tens of millions of people watch the results live,

  • and tickets cost hundreds of dollars.

  • But the biggest difference?

  • Today's movie studios spend millions

  • to convince the Academy that their films deserve to win.

  • KYLE BUCHANAN: Sometimes the amount of money

  • that a studio will spend when they're campaigning

  • for an Oscar is even more money than the budget

  • of the movie to begin with.

  • - That's Kyle Buchanan.

  • He covers all things Oscars for "The New York Times."

  • KYLE BUCHANAN: If you want to get your movie taken seriously,

  • you've got to spend.

  • You've got to make sure that there are ads out there,

  • that there are events, that people are contextualizing

  • you as an Oscar contender.

  • - And why do studios spend that much cash

  • for 8 and 1/2 pound statuette?

  • For a smaller studio like A24 or Annapurna,

  • the answer is pretty obvious.

  • KYLE BUCHANAN: They're making movies for, you know,

  • not a big budget a lot of the time.

  • But in order to be seen when the marketplace is choked

  • with these big blockbusters and superhero films,

  • they need that sort of extra headline-making ability

  • that an awards season can provide.

  • - But what about a bigger studio like

  • Warner Brothers or Universal?

  • As we've seen over the past couple decades,

  • box office hits aren't often considered Oscar contenders,

  • and blockbusters don't really need the exposure

  • that a nomination brings.

  • Isn't the money enough of a reward?

  • KYLE BUCHANAN: The people who work on these movies,

  • by and large, are artists who want

  • to be appreciated as artists by other artists in town.

  • So when they are in contention for an Oscar,

  • it means something deeper.

  • It satisfies them in a way that money can't only.

  • - So it's really about talent acquisition

  • and talent retainment.

  • KYLE BUCHANAN: Yeah, it's about making sure that people

  • are happy, you know?

  • We see it all the time when a star has had success

  • and then they want to do something more serious.

  • They want to be understood as an artist with something to say.

  • JACK: Is that me?

  • - When Warner Brothers goes all in on an Oscar campaign

  • for Bradley Cooper or Ben Affleck or Clint Eastwood,

  • it's not just for bragging rights

  • or even a box office bump.

  • No.

  • The studio spends that cash to show commitment to its stars

  • and to keep them coming back for future projects.

  • For example, Hollywood's biggest studio, Disney,

  • is pushing harder and harder for its top blockbusters

  • to be an Oscar contention.

  • - What next?

  • - But the race isn't just between traditional studios

  • anymore.

  • So why does something like Netflix want to win an Oscar?

  • I mean, it's already the talk of Hollywood.

  • It's one of the biggest media companies on the planet.

  • Why does it need the little gold man?

  • KYLE BUCHANAN: I think Netflix is

  • eager to disrupt any industry it can get its hands on.

  • You know, they've already changed the way

  • that we watch television.

  • Now they want to do the same for movies.

  • Just like any studio, they want to be able to get in the Oscar

  • race so that top tier auteurs will come

  • to them to make movies instead of the big studios

  • that are out there.

  • If they can penetrate this race, there's really

  • nothing that Netflix can't do.

  • They want to upend the idea of theatrical distribution

  • being the end-all, be-all of seeing a movie.

  • They want to change the way you see a movie.

  • And if they can get Oscar to validate that,

  • then they've gotten almost all the way there.

  • - The Academy is getting younger and more diverse,

  • and its nominees and winners are shifting, too.

  • KYLE BUCHANAN: I think it's good and necessary

  • to recontextualize what we think of as an Oscar contender

  • because it means that a lot of better movies that have maybe

  • even historically overlooked by the season

  • but have certainly not been overlooked by audience members

  • can actually get into the race.

  • - Over the decades, the Academy Awards

  • and become bigger, more expensive,

  • and maybe a bit more inclusive.

  • But in the end, Louis B. Mayer started

  • the awards to flatter stars into working in his movies.

  • And today's studios will spend more

  • than ever to do just the same.

  • KYLE BUCHANAN: When it comes to this town, when it comes

  • to Hollywood, a lot of people go into the industry--

  • or even before they get into the industry,

  • they've stood in front of that mirror.

  • They've practiced that Oscar speech.

  • It is still the summit of this industry in so many ways,

  • and a lot of people want that to really

  • feel like they've hit the dream that they've always had.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: Extremely cold weather hit parts of Canada

  • and the northern US recently.

  • The upside?

  • Ice at Niagara Falls.

  • Spectacular scenes were captured recently

  • on the border between Ontario and New York State,

  • including innumerable chunks of ice floating over the falls.

  • Parts of Niagara have frozen before.

  • Whenever temperatures dip below zero Fahrenheit

  • and stick around for a while, you can expect

  • to see clods and clouds of ice.

  • Hard not to Falls for that for a spill.

  • We hear the view from the island was the "Goat,"

  • a veritable "horseshoe-in" for photographic excellence.

  • It's a fast breaking update on current events,

  • and we thank you for taking the time to watch.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • "CNN 10" hopes you'll rush back in tomorrow.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

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