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  • CARL AZUZ: Hi, I'm Carl Azuz for CNN 10.

  • After substantial investigative journalism,

  • I can now confirm definitively that Fridays are awesome.

  • And it's great to be wrapping up the week with you.

  • We have a report out of the United Kingdom

  • to kick things off today.

  • We told you on Wednesday how an agreement on Brexit,

  • a plan for how Britain would leave the European Union,

  • failed.

  • The deal was made between the EU and the administration

  • of British Prime Minister Theresa May.

  • But it needed to be approved by Britain's parliament first,

  • and British lawmakers voted against it.

  • After that happened, the leader of Britain's Labour Party,

  • which opposes the Conservative Party that's in power,

  • called for a no confidence vote in Prime

  • Minister May's government.

  • That could have led to major changes

  • in Britain's leadership.

  • - In US politics, when the president dies,

  • resigns, or is impeached, finding that replacement

  • is straightforward.

  • The vice president steps up, and after them

  • the Speaker of the House.

  • But in British politics, the rules

  • are a lot more complicated.

  • A prime minister can resign.

  • But in the UK, if Parliament or their own MPs

  • are unhappy with their leadership,

  • they can also be forced out.

  • During World War II, even Winston Churchill

  • survived two so-called votes of no-confidence

  • from Parliament over his management of the war.

  • And almost 50 years later, Margaret Thatcher

  • was ousted from office by disgruntled

  • employees in her own party, and she chose to resign.

  • In the UK, a PM's own political party chooses their successor.

  • And each has a different way of doing that.

  • Conservative MPs elect two candidates from a choice of MPs

  • who put themselves forwards.

  • Then, the public membership of the party votes for the winner.

  • However, most Brits aren't registered

  • members of a political party.

  • Unlike the conservatives, in the Labour Party,

  • once candidates are endorsed by Labour parliamentarians,

  • registered members from the general public have

  • as much say as politicians.

  • Members vote, and if one candidate

  • wins 50% of the ballots then they will election.

  • If no one does, then the least popular candidate is eliminated

  • and voters' second preferences are

  • considered until one candidate holds 50% of the votes.

  • This allows unexpected choices for party leader--

  • like Jeremy Corbyn, a far-left candidate.

  • He was elected to head Labour in 2015 after a groundswell

  • of popular support.

  • Parliamentary rules mean that if this new leader can form

  • a new government within two weeks,

  • he or she can hold onto the PM's seat.

  • This is how Theresa May came to power after David

  • Cameron resigned in 2016.

  • But before they officially become PM,

  • the royal family has to have a say.

  • This is the United Kingdom, after all.

  • The prime minister serves at the pleasure of the monarch.

  • So before the PM can move into Number 10 Downing Street,

  • the official residence, they pop by Buckingham Palace

  • to request the queen's blessing to form an official government.

  • And with that, the UK has a new PM.

  • CARL AZUZ: But the vote held in the British government

  • on Wednesday confirmed that may still has

  • the confidence of lawmakers.

  • In December, she won a confidence vote

  • within her own Conservative Party.

  • This week, the bigger House of Commons--

  • which includes hundreds more lawmakers

  • from several more parties--

  • voted in favor of Prime Minister May's government

  • staying in power.

  • The count was 325 to 306.

  • The nation's leader still has the immense challenge

  • of figuring out Brexit, but she also

  • gets to keep her job as the person to do it--

  • and to lead Britain.

  • 10-second trivia-- Patriots, Stinger, and Tomahawk

  • are all names of what?

  • Military missions, missiles, modeling

  • agencies, or monster trucks?

  • All of these are the names of missiles

  • used by the US military.

  • A review of US weapons that was discussed Thursday

  • was focused on missile defense, protecting

  • America against missile threats from other countries.

  • When President Donald Trump visited the Pentagon

  • to discuss America's strategy, he mentioned

  • defending the US from space.

  • The plan would be to deploy sensors

  • there that could discover when a missile

  • was fired from the ground and then

  • keep track of where it went.

  • It's not clear what the cost would

  • be for a program like that.

  • Other options for missile defense

  • could include lasers deployed from drones that would destroy

  • incoming weapons, and a system that's now in place

  • uses interceptor missiles to blow

  • up ones that are in flight.

  • A company that makes those also manufactures

  • computer-guided cruise missiles.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: The Tomahawk is considered the world's

  • most advanced cruise missile.

  • It's been used in combat more than 2,000

  • times by the US Navy, from Syria to Sudan to Serbia.

  • And all of the new Tomahawks come out

  • of one factory, this one, in a city

  • and state we've been asked not to reveal for security reasons.

  • The 20-foot-long Tomahawks are manufactured

  • by the Raytheon company.

  • Kim Ernzen is one of Raytheon's top missile executives.

  • KIM ERNZEN: And this is the final configuration

  • before it goes out the door to our customer.

  • In this facility is where we do the integration of the rocket

  • motors and the warheads, what we call the energetics

  • elements of the missiles.

  • Other components and sub-assemblies

  • come from our other factories located here,

  • and then we do the final assembly

  • here, test it, fuel it, and get it ready to go out the door.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: How soon will these be going out the door?

  • KIM ERNZEN: In the next couple of days.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: In this factory, 14 Tomahawks

  • are about to be shipped out.

  • Workers here are performing what they call a roll test to make

  • sure there is nothing loose inside the missile

  • and that everything is connected properly.

  • Raytheon's contract with the Navy

  • is for 196 missiles for this year.

  • KIM ERNZEN: Tomahawk can fly 1,000-plus miles.

  • So it can get launched from a ship or a submarine.

  • It can go up and loiter, as we call it,

  • where it can fly around in a figure-eight pattern.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: So in other words, once it's

  • sent off, if you want to change where it's going it loiters.

  • It just goes in a circle and you figure out--

  • KIM ERNZEN: It does.

  • It can be redirected and rerouted to a specific target.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: The Tomahawk has been around since the 1980s.

  • But this is the newest version of the missile,

  • manufactured since 2004.

  • It can be used for up to 30 years.

  • And Tomahawks that haven't been used

  • come back after 15 years for recertification and upgrades.

  • KIM ERNZEN: So this is the rocket

  • motor that launches it out of the vertical launch system.

  • So it is what propels it out.

  • So when you see the footage of a missile coming out of a ship,

  • it is the plume that gets it out of that vertical launch.

  • And as you move more up toward the front

  • is the navigation communication system,

  • and then ultimately up here at the very end is the warhead.

  • And it is a 1,000-pound warhead.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: With their GPS guidance,

  • the Tomahawks can strike within mere feet of a target.

  • They are launched from ships or submarines.

  • KIM ERNZEN: If it comes from a submarine,

  • it will then swim through the water.

  • The rocket motor will take it up out of the water

  • and then will eventually get it up

  • into the airplane mode, which is where it will fly and perform

  • its mission from there.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: So it swims and it flies.

  • KIM ERNZEN: Its swims and it flies.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: The price tag per missile?

  • About $1.1 million.

  • Each Tomahawk weighs about 3,500 pounds.

  • So when 60 of them were fired towards Syria,

  • that was about 210,000 pounds of firepower.

  • People who work here tell us this isn't just a job.

  • KIM ERNZEN: It is an honor to be able to work for the men

  • and women in uniform, and to be able to supply

  • them with a competitive advantage

  • when they're put in harm's way.

  • And that's what we do.

  • We make sure that they have an unfair advantage

  • out in theater.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: So that's what you say,

  • that this gives the US military an unfair advantage.

  • KIM ERNZEN: Absolutely.

  • And we want to keep it that way.

  • GARY TUCHMAN: Gary Tuchman, CNN.

  • CARL AZUZ: Lesser-known creations

  • made with three-dimensional printers-- musical flutes,

  • shoes, a bridge.

  • And unlike the 3D-printed coat hooks or phone cases

  • you've seen, this thing is made of concrete

  • and it spans more than 86 feet over a pond in Shanghai, China.

  • Dozens of hollow concrete sections

  • were printed and then joined together to make it.

  • The bridge is also said to be more than 30%

  • cheaper to build than a traditional one.

  • Of course, it's not a bridge over troubled water.

  • It may not get many sighs.

  • For those who can't travel to China, it's a bridge too far.

  • And people who build bridges on rivers might ask, Kwai.

  • But it does take old methods to bridge them

  • with new technology, so we'll see

  • if it spans the test of time.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • We'll be off next Monday for the Martin

  • Luther King, Jr. holiday.

  • We'll look forward to seeing you Tuesday with "CNN 10" returns.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

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CNN10】2019年1月18日 ([CNN 10] January 18, 2019)

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