Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hey, Thoughty2 here.

    やあ、Thoughty2です。

  • The year is 1096, it will be 203 years until the Ottoman empire will begin and start decorating many a living room with comfortable foot stools.

    年は1096年、それはオスマン帝国が開始され、快適な足のスツールで多くのリビングルームを飾ることを開始するまで203年になります。

  • In 334 years, the Aztec empire will be founded and begin sacrificing 20,000 humans a year to keep themselves occupied.

    334年後にはアステカ帝国が成立し、自分たちが占領されないように年間2万人の人間を犠牲にし始める。

  • And it will be 487 years, until the British Empire start taking over the world by sticking flags in things and people.

    そして、大英帝国が物や人に国旗を突き刺して世界征服を始めるまで、あと487年。

  • Yet, in this year of 1096, what is today the world's oldest university in the English-speaking world, Oxford University, will teach its very first lesson.

    しかし、1096年の今年、英語圏では世界最古の大学であるオックスフォード大学では、今日、何がまさに最初の授業を行うことになりました。

  • One hundred and thirteen years later, Cambridge University will be founded.

    その113年後にケンブリッジ大学が設立されます。

  • And between them, both these two powerhouses of education, spanning back almost a millennium, have changed the world in more ways than one can count and definitely for the better.

    この二人の間には、ほぼ千年の歴史を持つ教育の大国があり、数えきれないほど多くの方法で世界を変え、間違いなく良い方向へと導いてきました。

  • These two research and education establishments are responsible for world-changing inventions and discoveries such as the theory of evolution, IVF, artificial intelligence, heart and lung transplants, stem cell research, gravity, the discovery of electrons and nuclear fission, and last but not least, the Internet.

    この2つの研究教育機関は、進化論、体外受精、人工知能、心臓移植、肺移植、幹細胞研究、重力、電子や核分裂の発見、そして最後にインターネットなど、世界を変える発明や発見に責任を持っています。

  • And those are just a small selection.

    そして、それらはほんの一部です。

  • So to try and argue that a university education is a waste of time and money would be futile, would it not?

    だから、大学教育は時間とお金の無駄だと主張しようとしても無駄ではないでしょうか?

  • Well, all over the world education has changed dramatically since the days when the inventor of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners Lee, studied at Oxford University.

    まあ、ワールドワイドウェブの発明者であるティム・バーナーズ・リーがオックスフォード大学に留学していた時代から、世界中の教育は大きく変わってきています。

  • And it has even changed over the past 15 years, since Mark Zuckerberg learnt how to ruin the World Wide Web with Facebook at Harvard University.

    そして、マーク・ザッカーバーグがハーバード大学でフェイスブックでワールド・ワイド・ウェブを破滅させる方法を学んでから、この15年でさらに変わった。

  • University, or college education as our transatlantic cousins call it, is today less relevant than ever before in history. And for many young people, attending university could be one of the most expensive and biggest mistakes they ever make.

    大西洋を横断する私たちのいとこたちが言うところの大学教育は、今日では歴史上、かつてないほど重要ではなくなっています。 そして多くの若者にとって、大学に通うことは、これまでに犯した中で最も高額で大きな過ちの一つになるかもしれません。

  • Aside from pre-purchasing "No Man's Sky."

    "No Man's Sky "の購入は別として

  • All over the developed world we have it drilled into our heads during our school days that higher education is the path to gold and riches.

    先進国の至る所で、高等教育が金と富への道であることが、学生時代に頭に叩き込まれています。

  • Get a college diploma they said, get a university degree they insisted, and you too will be able to afford champagne, hot tubs and unlimited naked women.

    彼らが主張した大学の卒業証書を取得し、あなたもシャンパン、ホットタブ、無制限の裸の女性を買う余裕ができるようになります。

  • We get told that so frequently by our elders because when they attended university that was mostly true.

    彼らが大学に通っていた頃は、それがほとんどだったので、私たちは年長者からそう頻繁に言われています。

  • Thirty years ago if you were lucky enough to study at university you were pretty much guaranteed a job in your field of study.

    30年前に大学で勉強して運が良ければ、その分野での仕事はかなり保証されていました。

  • Engineering graduates would go on to work for a car or aircraft manufacturer; media students could get a job at a broadcasting house and so on.

    工学部を卒業した学生は自動車メーカーや航空機メーカーに就職し、メディア系の学生は放送局などに就職することができます。

  • Provided you got a decent grade your future in a well-paid job was almost guaranteed.

    まともな成績を収めれば、高給取りの仕事での将来はほぼ保証されていた。

  • Today things have changed, on average, only half of university and college graduates get a job in the years following graduation.

    今日では状況が変わってきており、平均して大卒・短大卒者のうち、卒業後の数年間に就職するのは半数に過ぎません。

  • And I'm not even talking about a job that has anything to do with what they studied.

    勉強したことと関係のある仕事の話でもないしな

  • Statistics show that many of those 50% of employed graduates are working in completely unrelated, menial jobs because today less than 30% of all university graduates go in to work in the field of their degree.

    統計によると、就職した50%の卒業生の多くは、全く関係のない下働きの仕事に就いていることがわかっています。

  • Unless you took The Underwater Basket Weaving Degree; the demand for those things is off the bloody charts.

    水中バスケット織りの学位を取っていない限り、そのようなものの需要は非常に高いです。

  • Yes, that is a genuine course.

    そう、それは正真正銘のコースです。

  • The reason behind this has a lot to do with numbers.

    その背景には、数字が大きく関係しています。

  • In the 50s, 60s and 70s, only the middle classes and affluent families could afford to send their little cretins to university.

    50年代、60年代、70年代には、中流階級と裕福な家庭だけが、チビのクレチンを大学に行かせる余裕があった。

  • Even in the UK, where university tuition fees have only existed since 1998, it didn't matter. Because to support the family, children would have to go off to work at the age of 18 or even younger, higher education was just never an option for most people.

    大学の授業料が1998年からしか存在しないイギリスでさえ、それは問題ではありませんでした。家族を養うためには、子供たちは18歳以下で就職しなければならないため、高等教育を受けることはほとんどの人にとって決して選択肢にはなりませんでした。

  • As a result, in 1950 a pitiful 3% of people in the UK attended university.

    その結果、1950年には、英国で大学に通っている人は3%に過ぎなかった。

  • Today that has risen to 49%.

    今日ではそれが49%に上昇しています。

  • That's obviously a really good thing, as a society we are all now more driven and more financially able to attend university and educate ourselves in any field we choose.

    それは明らかに本当に良いことです。社会として、私たちは今、より多くのお金を出して大学に通い、自分たちが選んだ分野で教育を受けることができるようになりました。

  • But the problem is the number of jobs available has hardly risen at all.

    しかし、問題は求人数がほとんど上がっていないことです。

  • With so many hundreds of thousands of graduates each year in the UK and over 4.5 million new graduates each year in the US, the competition for the specialised, high paying jobs is greater than ever before.

    イギリスでは毎年何十万人もの卒業生が、アメリカでは毎年450万人以上の新卒者を輩出しているので、専門的で高給取りの仕事の競争はこれまで以上に激しくなっています。

  • And if you graduated in something more general that isn't so specialised, such as media or business studies, then good luck to you my friend because you've a got an extremely tough journey ahead of you.

    もしあなたがもっと一般的なものを卒業していて、メディアや経営学などの専門的ではないものを卒業したのなら、私の友人には幸運を祈るよ。

  • If you currently are or have been in this situation yourself, you will know just how horrible it feels.

    あなたが現在、またはあなた自身がこのような状況にあった場合、あなたはちょうどそれがどのように恐ろしい感じを知っているでしょう。

  • But if not, imagine spending two to six years at university, studying hard, sitting through countless lectures with a hangover probably and living off nothing but the two important student food groups, instant noodles, and whatever you just found in the cupboard, on toast.

    しかし、そうでない場合は、大学で2〜6年間を過ごすことを想像してみてください、一生懸命勉強して、おそらく二日酔いで数え切れないほどの講義に座って、何もないが、2つの重要な学生の食品グループ、インスタントラーメン、あなただけの食器棚で見つけたものは何でも、トーストにします。

  • But finally, after the seemingly longest and hardest years of your life so far, you have a moment of glory, you graduate.

    しかし、これまでの人生の中で、一見長くて大変そうな年月を経て、ようやく栄光の瞬間が訪れ、卒業するのです。

  • You throw your cap into the air and you are filled with optimism for the fruitful career that awaits you.

    あなたは帽子を投げて、あなたを待っている実りあるキャリアのために楽観的に満たされています。

  • Then six months later you're working in a call centre, still eating your typical student diet.

    半年後にはコールセンターで働いていて、典型的な学生食を食べています。

  • Now imagine all that but you are also joyfully over £50,000 in debt.

    今、すべてのことを想像してみてくださいが、あなたも喜んで5万ポンド以上の借金をしています。

  • And this exact situation is not just befallen on a fringe group of graduates, the majority of university graduates, over 70% find themselves in a career they never wanted. And almost 100% will be in debt for the next 30 years of their life.

    そして、この正確な状況は、大学卒業者の大多数が、70%以上が決して望んでいなかったキャリアに身を置いているという、卒業生のフリンジグループにだけ降りかかっているわけではありません。そして、ほぼ100%が人生の次の30年のために借金をすることになります。

  • I'm not here to say whether universities should be free or not because, truthfully, there are incredibly strong arguments on both sides of that fence.

    私は、大学が自由であるべきかどうかを言うためにここに来たのではありません。

  • On one hand, charging tuition fees makes students value and appreciate the opportunity more strongly; and they tend to put more effort into their work.

    一方で、授業料を徴収することで、学生はその機会をより強く評価し、仕事に力を入れるようになります。

  • Also, without having to rely on government handouts, universities can also offer a higher quality of education and more resources for students.

    また、政府の配付に頼らなくても、大学はより質の高い教育を提供することができ、学生にはより多くのリソースを提供することができます。

  • But conversely, if university fees are completely abolished, a greater diversity of people are given an opportunity to better themselves. And in the long-term, it actually pays off for the government and for society because a generally better educated society are going to contribute more to the country's economy in the future through increased innovation and business.

    しかし、逆に言えば、大学の学費が完全に廃止されれば、より多様な人々に自分自身を向上させる機会が与えられることになります。そして長期的には、政府や社会のためにも報われることになるのです。

  • The shittin' Shake Weight didn't invent itself, you know.

    糞シェイク・ウェイトは自分で発明したんじゃないんだよ。

  • University or college graduates are also statistically far less likely to be involved in crime, reducing policing and prison costs and are less likely to rely on social welfare during their lifetime.

    また、大学や大卒者は、統計的には犯罪に巻き込まれにくく、警察や刑務所の費用が減り、生涯社会福祉に頼ることが少なくなります。

  • Just think about it, when was the last time you saw a doctor of theoretical physics having a custody battle with their sister on Jeremy Kyle?

    考えてみてくれ理論物理学の博士がジェレミー・カイルの妹と親権争いをしているのを最後に見たのは いつだったかな?

  • Each year millions of young people graduate from universities. But a poll, recently conducted in the UK, shows that one-third of university graduates regret going to university all together.

    毎年何百万人もの若者が大学を卒業しています。しかし、最近イギリスで行われた世論調査によると、大学を卒業した人の3分の1は、一斉に大学に行くことを後悔しています。

  • So what's the issue here?

    何が問題なんだ?

  • Do students just regret how much money they spent on instant noodles and booze?

    学生はインスタントラーメンやお酒にどれだけお金を使ったかを後悔しているだけなのでしょうか。

  • Probably, but that's not the main issue.

    おそらくですが、それが本題ではありません。

  • Whether you paid for your tuition or not, the problem is what you're actually getting in return for your hard spent time and money.

    学費を払ったかどうかはともかく、問題は、苦労して使った時間とお金の見返りが実際に何なのかということです。

  • When polled 49% of graduates said they could have gotten the job they are currently doing without ever attending university or higher education.

    世論調査では、49%の卒業生が、大学や高等教育に一度も通わなくても、今の仕事に就くことができたと答えています。

  • The problem isn't just the sheer number of university graduates out there and the huge competition.

    問題は、大卒者の数の多さと競争の激しさだけではありません。

  • Over the years, the true value of a university degree has been eroded away becoming increasingly worthless, just like Windows.

    何年もかけて、大学の学位の真の価値は、Windowsと同じように、ますます価値のないものに侵食されてきました。

  • Over recent years, the percentage of university graduates achieving a first or 1:1 has risen sharply.

    ここ数年、大卒者の1位、1:1の達成率が急上昇しています。

  • In the UK, ministers have spoken out about how they believe universities are increasingly making it easier in very sneaky ways for their students to achieve higher marks, so that the establishment looks better on paper. And thus, they can better compete in university league tables.

    英国では、大臣たちは、大学がますます、学生がより高い成績を取るために非常に卑劣な方法で容易にしていると考えていることについて話しています、そうすれば、大学の設立が紙面上でより良く見えるようになります。 そしてその結果、大学のリーグ戦でより良い競争ができるようになっているのです。

  • And to make things worse, it's believed that in many universities across the globe, corruption and abuse of funds is rife. If the many reports are to be believed, then it's particularly bad in US higher education.

    さらに悪いことに、世界中の多くの大学では、汚職や資金の乱用が横行していると考えられている。多くの報告が信じられるとすれば、アメリカの高等教育では特にひどい。

  • Surely the 50 thousand plus you borrowed to attend university is put to good use, is it not?

    大学に通うために借りた5万プラスは、きっと有効に使われているのではないでしょうか?

  • It's spent on hiring the best teachers in the world; purchasing the best facilities for students.

    世界一の教師を雇ったり、学生のために最高の施設を購入したりするために使われています。

  • Well... Yes, a lot of it is, but many journalists have uncovered a seedy underbelly in many top universities.

    えーと...そうですね、たくさんありますが、多くのジャーナリストが、多くの一流大学の陰湿な裏事情を暴いてきました。

  • Many higher up staffs, such as university presidents, can earn more than many CEOs of big corporations.

    大学の学長など、多くの上の職員は、多くの大企業のCEOよりも多くの収入を得ることができます。

  • And one really has to think, should they be really earning that much from a nonprofit organization?

    そして、1つは本当に考えなければならないのは、彼らは本当に非営利団体からそんなに稼いでいるべきなのでしょうか?

  • Apart from day to day management, the primary role of a university president is fundraising.

    日々の経営とは別に、大学の学長の主な役割は資金調達です。

  • This involves horrendously arduous tasks, such as wining and dining international visitors, or even jet setting off for days at a time for "meetings". How hard it must be for them?

    これには、海外からの訪問者を食事に連れて行ったり、「会議」のために何日もジェット機で出かけるなど、恐ろしく困難な仕事が含まれています。それがどれほど大変なことなのでしょうか。

  • And of course, university funds are used to pay for all of these activities.

    そして、もちろん大学の資金は、これらの活動のすべてに使われています。

  • Universities have long been viewed as nonprofit establishments. But journalists believe that today many large American universities are acting more and more like for-profit corporations.

    大学は長い間、非営利施設とみなされてきました。しかし、ジャーナリストは、今日、多くのアメリカの大規模な大学が、ますます営利企業のように振る舞っていると考えています。

  • They are increasingly engaging in patenting and licensing of ideas, concepts and innovations, which only opens up opportunities to profit from an idea and is directly contradictory to providing open education for all.

    彼らは、アイデア、コンセプト、イノベーションの特許化やライセンス化にますます取り組んでいますが、それはアイデアから利益を得る機会を広げるだけであり、すべての人に開かれた教育を提供することとは正反対のことです。

  • And this is just scratching the surface, UNESCO released a report called "Corrupt Schools, Corrupt Universities: What Can be Done?" after six years of investigation into schools and universities worldwide.

    そして、これは表面を掻きむしっているに過ぎません。ユネスコは、世界の学校と大学を6年間調査した後、「Corrupt Schools, Corrupt Universities」という報告書を発表しました。世界の学校や大学を6年間調査した結果、「何ができるか」という報告書を発表しました。

  • The report claims that education at all levels is corrupted with embezzlement, illegal registration fees and academic fraud, among other shady practices.

    報告書は、あらゆるレベルの教育が横領や違法な登録料、学歴詐称などのいかがわしい行為で腐敗していると主張している。

  • I'm not trying to put anyone off higher education. For so many people, it can absolutely be the right choice; and the best thing they will ever do.

    私は誰かを高等教育から遠ざけようとしているわけではありません。多くの人にとって、高等教育は絶対に正しい選択であり、彼らがこれまでにしてきたことの中で最高のものです。

  • But if you are turning against the idea, then what are your alternatives?

    しかし、もしあなたがそれに反発しているのであれば、あなたの代替案は何かありますか?

  • Well, unfortunately, if your dream is to be a doctor, dentist or engineer, I'm afraid you will have to attend university, since they are strictly regulated. After all, would you want to operated on by a surgeon who got their diploma from the University of YouTube?

    まあ、残念ながら、あなたの夢が医師や歯科医師、技術者になることならば、大学は規制が厳しいので、大学に通わなければならないと思います。結局のところ、ユーチューバーの大学で卒業証書をもらった外科医に手術してもらいたいと思いますか?

  • But those specific careers aside, the only thing stopping you from achieving your dream job is your passion.

    しかし、それらの特定のキャリアはさておき、あなたの夢の仕事を達成するためにあなたを止める唯一のものは、あなたの情熱です。

  • The most important thing you can do in your professional life is whatever makes you happy. If you're currently thinking about your future career, you may think that by opting for a well-paid but boring job you will have a happy life. But I promise, you the day will come when you wish you had followed your true passion instead.

    職業人生で最も重要なことは、自分が幸せになることが何であれ、それを実現することです。もしあなたが今、将来のキャリアを考えているなら、給料は高いが退屈な仕事を選べば、幸せな人生を送れると思うかもしれません。しかし、「自分の本当の情熱に従っていればよかった」と思う日が必ず来ることをお約束します。

  • And if you're 30 years down the line and you already realized this 20 years ago, then I'm truly sorry my friend.

    30年先の話で20年前にすでに気付いていたのなら、本当に申し訳ないと思っています。

  • But I think it's about time for your mid-life crisis, I can just go ahead and give you a list of numbers for Porsche dealerships if you'd like.

    でも、そろそろ中年の危機だと思うので、もしよろしければポルシェのディーラーの数字のリストをお渡しします。

  • Today, with the internet, the opportunities to do what you love are limitless; and literally the only thing stopping you from accomplishing your dreams is your willingness to try.

    今日では、インターネットで、あなたが好きなことをする機会は無限であり、文字通り、あなたの夢を達成することからあなたを止めている唯一のものは、しようとするあなたの意欲です。

  • And if you stick around until the end of this video, I'll tell you a story that will make you want to stop everything you're doing and follow your dreams no matter how big they are.

    そして、あなたがこのビデオの最後まで張り付いている場合、私はあなたがやっているすべてのものを停止して、彼らがどのように大きくてもあなたの夢を追いかけたくなるような話をお教えします。

  • One of the absolute best places on the internet to allow you to achieve your dreams and follow your passion is SkillShare.

    インターネット上で、あなたの夢を実現し、情熱を追い求めることができる最高の場所の一つが、スキルシェアです。

  • Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes in design, business, technology and so much more.

    Skillshareは、デザイン、ビジネス、テクノロジーなど、数千ものクラスがあるオンライン学習コミュニティです。

  • Premium Membership gives you unlimited access to high quality classes on must-know topics; so you can improve your skills, unlock new opportunities, and just do the work you love.

    プレミアム会員になると、知っておきたいトピックの質の高いクラスに無制限にアクセスできるようになり、スキルアップや新しい機会を得ることができます。

  • One Skillshare course I found absolutely essential is "The Writer's Toolkit: 6 Steps to a Successful Writing Habit."

    私が絶対に必要だと感じたスキルシェアコースの一つが、"The Writer's Toolkit."The Writer's Toolkit: 6 Steps to a Successful Writing Habit"

  • Whether your dream is to be a novelist, journalist or even write videos like me, this course teaches you how to express your ideas and avoid writer's block. It's an absolute must.

    あなたの夢が小説家やジャーナリストになることであっても、私のように動画を書くことであっても、このコースでは、あなたのアイデアを表現し、ライターズブロックを回避する方法を教えてくれます。それは絶対に必要です。

  • What's so great about Skillshare is how affordable it is. An annual subscription is less than $10 a month; and for what you get, that's unbelievable value.

    Skillshareの魅力はなんといってもそのお手頃な価格です。年間購読料は月10ドル以下で、あなたが得るもののために、それは信じられないほどの価値があります。

  • I have yet to find a self-learning platform out there that rivals the professionalism and the wealth of incredible knowledge you can find on Skillshare. Whether you want to realize a lifelong dream or simply start a new side project, Skillshare is a must have tool.

    私はまだ、プロ意識に匹敵する自己学習プラットフォームを見つけるためにそこにまだ持っていると信じられないほどの知識の豊富さは、Skillshare上で見つけることができます。あなたが生涯の夢を実現したい、または単に新しいサイドプロジェクトを開始したいかどうか、Skillshareはツールを持っている必要があります。

  • And since Skillshare is sponsoring this video, the first 500 people to use the promo link in the description will get their first 2 months for free.

    Skillshareはこのビデオを後援しているので、最初の500人は説明のプロモリンクを使用するには、無料で最初の2ヶ月を取得します。

  • So about that story I promised you.

    約束した話だけど

  • There are hundreds of rags to riches stories; and each one is inspiring in its own way. But there is one entrepreneur who has perhaps suffered more than any other on his journey to success.

    貧乏から金持ちになるまでのストーリーは何百もあり、それぞれの方法で感動を与えてくれます。しかし、成功への道のりの中で、おそらく他の誰よりも苦しんできた起業家がいます。

  • Californian John Paul DeJoria is today worth $4 billion, but not so long ago he was homeless.

    カリフォルニア州のジョン・ポール・デジョリアは、今日では40億ドルの価値がありますが、少し前まではホームレスでした。

  • Let me tell you exactly how that happened.

    その経緯を具体的にお話しましょう。

  • DeJoria grew up in a very poor household without a father. At nine years old, he started selling newspapers just so his mother and brother could eat.

    デジョリアは父親のいない極貧家庭で育った。9歳の時、彼は母と兄が食べていけるように新聞を売り始めた。

  • Eventually, DeJoria was sent to a foster home when his mother could no longer support him and his brother.

    やがてデジョリアは、母親が兄と弟を養うことができなくなったため、児童養護施設に送られることになった。

  • In school, his maths teacher once told him that he would never succeed at anything in life; and DeJoria says that ever since that moment he was determined to change his life.

    学校で数学の先生に「人生で何をやっても成功しない」と言われたことがあり、その時以来、自分の人生を変えようと決意したとデジョリアは言います。

  • An interesting side note, my maths teacher once told me the exact same thing. Seriously, what is wrong with maths teachers?

    興味深いことに、私の数学の先生は以前、全く同じことを言っていました。真面目な話、数学の先生はどうしたの?

  • Also, if you're watching, "haha!"

    また、見ている人は "はっはっはっは!"

  • But if only things were that simple for DeJoria, because from here on out things only got worse for him.

    デジョリアにとっては単純なことだが ここから先は状況が悪化するだけだからな

  • At 22, DeJoria's wife abandoned him and their two-year-old son, but not before she drained every dime from his bank account and took his only car.

    22歳の時 デジョリアの妻は 彼と2歳の息子を捨てたが 彼の銀行口座から金を全て引き出して 彼の唯一の車を奪った後ではなかった

  • It's not really my place to say, but wow, what a grade A bitch!

    私が言うべきことではないが、うわぁ、なんてA級ビッチなんだ!

  • DeJoria was subsequently evicted from their flat and forced to live on the streets with his infant son.

    デジョリアはその後、アパートから追い出され、幼い息子と路上生活を余儀なくされた。

  • He was homeless for some time and resorted to rummaging through bins to find empty bottles.

    彼はしばらくホームレスだったが、空き瓶を探すためにビンをあさっていた。

  • At that time, you could trade in empty bottles at grocery stores for a couple of cents.

    当時は食料品店で空き瓶を数セントで取引できました。

  • He did this for a while just to make money to buy food for his son.

    息子のために食べ物を買うお金を稼ぐためだけにしばらくやっていたそうです。

  • Eventually, DeJoria got a job as a door to door salesman.

    やがてデジョリアは訪問販売の仕事に就いた。

  • The job requirements must have listed "must make a good stereotype" because he sold encyclopedias.

    百科事典を売っていたので、仕事の条件に「良いステレオタイプを作らなければならない」と記載されていたに違いない。

  • One day, DeJoria decided to start a hair care company with his friend, Paul Mitchell, who was also broke.

    ある日、デジョリアは友人のポール・ミッチェルと一緒にヘアケアの会社を始めることにした。

  • Incredibly, they managed to secure a $500,000 investment from a venture capitalist.

    信じられないことに、彼らはベンチャーキャピタルから50万ドルの投資を確保することに成功しました。

  • But on the day they were supposed to launch the company the only investor pulled out, leaving them with nothing.

    しかし、彼らが会社を立ち上げることになっていた日に、唯一の投資家が撤退し、彼らを何も残すことができませんでした。

  • This forced DeJoria to become homeless. Once again, he began living out of his car.

    これにより、デジョリアはホームレスになることを余儀なくされた。またしても、彼は車の外で生活を始めた。

  • So in one last ditch attempt to make his hair care company a success, he and his business partner Paul Mitchell pooled all their money together. And DeJoria asked his mum for a loan of $300.

    ヘアケア会社を成功させようと 最後の土壇場で 彼とビジネスパートナーのポール・ミッチェルは 全財産をプールしましたデジョリアは母親に300ドルの融資を頼んだ

  • All of this added up to just $700.

    これを全部足して、たったの700ドルになりました。

  • But it was just enough to produce their first bottles of shampoo; they even had to print the packaging in black and white because they couldn't afford color.

    しかし、それは彼らの最初のシャンプーのボトルを生産するのに十分なだけで、彼らは色を買う余裕がなかったので、パッケージを白黒で印刷しなければならなかった。

  • According to DeJoria, during the first two years they nearly went bankrupt almost every single day.

    デジョリアによると、最初の2年間はほぼ毎日のように倒産していたそうです。

  • But, eventually, they managed to slowly build up the business through hard, hard graft and their customer base of salons increased.

    しかし、最終的には、コツコツとコツコツとした接客でゆっくりと経営を積み上げていき、サロンの客層も増えていきました。

  • After two years, they were able to finally pay their bills and focus on growing their business.

    2年後、ようやく支払いを終え、事業の成長に専念することができました。

  • Their brand John Paul Mitchell Systems became a global success, selling in 150,000 salons all over the globe.

    彼らのブランドであるジョン・ポール・ミッチェルシステムは世界的な成功を収め、世界中の15万軒のサロンで販売されています。

  • John Paul DeJoria had everything taken from him twice and became homeless twice. Today the man is worth $4 billion.

    ジョン・ポール・デジョリアは2度全てを奪われ2度ホームレスになりました。今日、この男は40億ドルの価値があります。

  • Off the back of his success in hair care, he also started a premium Tequila company called Patron Spirits, which he just recently sold to Bacardi for $5.1 billion.

    ヘアケアでの成功を受けて、彼はパトロンスピリッツというプレミアムテキーラ会社を立ち上げましたが、最近バカルディに51億ドルで売却しました。

  • Now, if DeJoria's story doesn't give you the motivation to stick to and pursue your dreams no matter what, then nothing will.

    さて、デジョリアの話が何があっても粘り強く夢を追い求めるモチベーションを与えてくれなければ、何も始まらない。

  • At the end of the day, whether you're university educated or not, there's only one person that can make you successfulyou.

    結局のところ、大学歴があろうがなかろうが、あなたを成功させることができるのは、たった一人の人間-あなただけなのです。

  • And it won't be your college or university diploma that is responsible, it will be your determination to make it happen.

    そして、それはあなたの大学や大学の卒業証書の責任ではなく、それを実現するためのあなたの決意になるでしょう。

  • Thanks for watching.

    ご覧いただきありがとうございます。

  • If you enjoyed this video, then consider clicking here to support me on Patreon. It really helps out the channel.

    もしこの動画を楽しんでいただけたなら、ここをクリックしてPatreonで私をサポートすることを検討してください。それは本当にチャンネルを助けてくれます。

  • And I'd like to thank Skillshare, once again, for supporting this video. Don't forget to check out the promo link in the description, before it's too late, because you won't regret it.

    そして、このビデオをサポートしてくれたSkillshareに改めて感謝したいと思います。説明文にあるプロモリンクをチェックアウトするのを忘れないでください。

Hey, Thoughty2 here.

やあ、Thoughty2です。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 卒業 教育 大卒 仕事 多く ポール

大学・大学を後悔する人が多い理由の真実

  • 46073 1686
    羅世康 に公開 2018 年 07 月 15 日
動画の中の単語