Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Some people think Japan is a strange and different land, that they'll never understand.

    外国の方にとって、日本は奇妙で全く違った理解不能な世界だと感じている人がいるかもしれません。

  • Why do the Japanese do what they do?

    日本人の行動が分からない?

  • Well, Japan and its people are not so hard to comprehend,

    実は、日本とこの国の人々と理解し合うのはそれほど難しいことではありません、

  • once you realize that it's all about the rules.

    ルールさえ分かれば簡単です。

  • Once you know them, your time here will be easy peasy, Japaneasy.

    この日本でのルールを学べば、ここで生活を送るのは朝飯前になるでしょう。

  • And I'm going to break a rule of my own,

    とは言いつつ、ここで早速ルールを破ります。

  • which is that every shot should be there because it helps tell the story.

    動画では「見せる映像全てには意味があるという」撮影の基本ルールです。

  • These shots...

    こちらのシーン・・・。

  • I just had a bunch of sweet night time shots and I didn't want them to go to waste.

    素晴らしい夜景の映像が撮れたのでどうしてもお見せしたかったです。

  • Anyways...

    それは置いといて・・・。

  • It'd be my pleasure if you join me in discovering the rules that rule Japan.

    日本でのルールを 発見する旅に一緒に来てもらえたら嬉しいです。

  • Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of rules, both written and unwritten.

    とはいえど、ルールの数は膨大です!明示された物も暗黙の物も

  • But don't fret, that's why I made this video.

    でも大丈夫!そのためにこの動画を作成しました!

  • And to ease you in, let's start with a very simple one:

    まずは手始めに、簡単なルールから始めましょう:

  • what side of the street to walk on.

    道路のどの側を歩くか

  • And it couldn't be easier, it's just like driving.

    これはとても簡単です:車の運転と一緒です。

  • Drive on the left, pass on the right.

    車は左、歩行者は右。

  • To the 35% of the world, especially those hailing from the former British empire,

    世界の35%の方、特に元イギリス植民地(アメリカやカナダではなく)

  • this will make complete sense.

    にとっては常識でしょう。

  • To the other 65%, well,

    残りの65%の方は・・・・

  • focus on what you think is the right way to do it,

    ま〜、自分が「正しいと思っている」事の

  • and do the complete opposite.

    真逆をやれば良いでしょう。

  • So when walking, left is right, and right is wrong.

    だから歩いている時は、左が正しい・ライト、ライト・右、ライトがダメで・・・・

  • Tsk... that's a bit confusing.

    おっと、混乱した。

  • Left is good, right is bad?

    左が良い、右がダメ?

  • Ahhh... just... if you're playing chicken with some oba-san,

    ただ・・・おばあさんとスレスレにぶつかりそうになったら

  • veer left and you should avoid a direct confrontation.

    左に曲がれば真っ向勝負は避けられます。

  • And this basic rules flows to non-street situations as well.

    この基本的なルールは歩道以外の場合にも通じます。

  • Like take escalators.

    例えばエスカレーター。

  • Sticking left will always work.

    左側にずっといれば絶対に大丈夫です。

  • Except if you're in Osaka,

    大阪以外。

  • because they do it the other way just to be different.

    大阪は違うことをやりたいので逆になります。

  • We'll leave them out of it.

    という事でここは大阪を外します。

  • In Tokyo, which, come on people, is Japan, people stick to the left.

    東京では、もう日本そのものですね、左通行です。

  • See.

    このように。

  • Well, this is a special situation, where they probably had building constraints

    ここは特例ですね、多分、建築上の都合によって、

  • where they had to switch sides, so in this case,

    歩く側を替える場合とか、そういった場合は

  • left is wrong and right is right.

    左は間違いで右、ライトはライト、正しいです。

  • But just the same as driving, stick to the left, pass on the right.

    でも運転と一緒で、車は左、そして右で渡る。

  • There are not always escalators in train stations,

    駅には必ずしもエスカレーターが

  • so if you have to use the stairs, it's the same thing.

    沢山あるわけではないです。だから階段を使う時も同じです。

  • Move on over to the left side.

    左側で移動します。

  • Clearly this station put their labels on the wrong sides,

    この駅では明らかに表示が反対側に貼られているので、

  • and it's quite confusing for the normally very rule abiding Japanese citizens.

    いつもは規則を守る日本市民の方々も結構迷います。

  • I played it safe and walked up the middle.

    念のため、僕は真ん中を上がりました。

  • It's the only way to be wrong, whichever way was right.

    どっちが正しいとしても、これは唯一の間違った通りです。

  • Except in this situation,

    しかし、この状況では、

  • where staying in the middle was the correct move.

    僕がいる真ん中が正しい手段です。

  • And when it comes to scrambles, well,

    そしてスクランブル交差点ですが、

  • it's everyone for themselves.

    ここでは皆な思い思いに渡っています。

  • I think the key is to move with confidence.

    コツは、自信を持って渡ることです。

  • Rules about how and where you move continues at Shinto shrines,

    ルール、そしてどこを歩くかは神社にいても一緒です。

  • where you'll always find a Torii gate.

    ここでは必ず鳥居があります。

  • This is the boundary between holy ground and the secular world.

    鳥居は聖域と俗世の境目です。

  • When you pass through the gate, you are stepping into the domain of the deity.

    鳥居をくぐる時、神の領域に踏み入れる事になります。

  • Proper etiquette is to bow once before entering.

    ですので、正しいマナーはくぐる前にお辞儀をすることです。

  • Also, the middle is where the deity walks, so stick to the sides.

    そして神様は真ん中を通るので、必ず側の方を歩きます。

  • What happens if you walk around the gate?

    鳥居の周りを歩いたらどうなるか?

  • It's uncertain...

    それはわかりませんが、

  • it's got to be some type of loophole though.

    もしかしてルールの盲点かもしれませんね。

  • Something I also found out, is that if you're at Meiji Jingu

    後で学んだことですが、もし明治神宮で、

  • and doing your requisite photo or video taking,

    三脚を使わない方が良いです。

  • don't use sankyaku, which literally means three legs,

    英語ではトライポッドと言います。

  • but in this cases means tripod.

    それ意外でしたら、是非、存分写真を撮ってください。

  • But by all means, photograph away.

    この精巧な水の入った桶は何かって?

  • What about these elaborate water troughs?

    こちらは「手水舎」と言い、

  • The temizuya, is there so that you can perform misogi,

    禊(みそぎ)を行って自分の体と心を清めます。

  • which purifies your body and mind.

    元は、海や川な度で裸で行っていましたが、

  • While originally this was done in the nude at places like an ocean or river,

    今は手と口さえ洗えば十分です。

  • now it's enough to only wash your hands and mouth.

    昔みたいに習慣を守りませんね。

  • People just don't follow traditions like they used to.

    手順はこうです。左手を洗ってから、

  • But this is what you do. Clean your left hand,

    右手、そして左手を使って口を洗います。

  • then your right hand, then your mouth using your left hand.

    そして水を使って柄杓を洗います。一すくいで!

  • Let the water wash the ladle, all in one scoop!

    水も手際も綺麗ですね〜。

  • I gotta say, clean execution all-around.

    神社でのお供え物はどうするかって?

  • How about making an offering at the shrine?

    まず、お賽銭として硬貨を神様に捧げます。

  • First you throw in your saisen coin as an offering to the deity.

    鐘を鳴らして神様に挨拶をします。

  • Then ring the bell as a greeting.

    二回お辞儀してから、

  • Bow twice,

    二回手を打って、手をくっつけたまま、頭を下げて祈ります。

  • clap your hands twice and keep them together, then bow once to pray.

    仏教のお寺になると、ルールは忘れて大丈夫です。

  • When it comes to Buddhist temples, well, the rules go out the window.

    神社ほど厳しくないです。

  • It's not as strict as a Shinto shrine.

    手を叩く事以外。

  • Except clapping, don't clap.

    理由はわかりませんが、やってはいけません。

  • I don't know why, just don't do it.

    どうやって自分がいる場所が神社、あるいは寺か分かるかって?

  • And how do you know if you're at a Shinto shrine or a Buddhist temple?

    神社には必ず鳥居がありますが、お寺にはありません・・・

  • Shrines always have torii gates, while temples don't,

    鳥居のあるお寺以外は。

  • except when there's the temples that do.

    例えば、浅草寺の敷地内には神社があります。

  • Like the Senso-ji Buddhist temple grounds that has this Shinto shrine within it.

    では、両手を叩くルールに関してはどうなるのでしょうか?

  • So how would the clap rule apply in this situation?

    神社にいる場合、両手を叩く事はいい事です。

  • If you're at a shrine clapping is good.

    お寺にいる場合は、ダメです。

  • If you're at a temple, clapping is bad.

    お寺の敷地にある神社にいる場合、両手を叩く事は・・・・

  • If you're at a shrine on temple grounds, clapping is...

    ここで確かなのはこの方がとても可愛らしい事です。

  • What we can all agree on though, is that this guy is very cute.

    お寺でやる事は自分を線香の煙で洗う事です。

  • What you can do at a Buddhist temple is wash yourself with incense smoke.

    ペットさえも、体と魂を清められます。

  • Even your pet can have their body and spirit purified.

    煙で体を洗う事が良い事だったら、

  • If smoke flowing over your body is a good thing,

    煙を吸うのも、良い事なはずですよね?

  • then surely smoke being inhaled must be a great thing.

    タバコが日本で人気だった理由がここにあると思います。

  • I'm certain that's why the Japanese really took to tobacco

    元々は1543年、ポルトガルの船員から紹介された物です。

  • when Portuguese sailors introduced it in 1543.

    他の多くの先進国と違って、今でも

  • Because unlike most other developed countries,

    屋内で煙草を吸う事は日本でよく見かけます。

  • smoking indoors in Japan is still a common thing.

    また、東京では喫煙するための「鳥居」をよく見かけます。

  • You can also find outdoor temples to smoking all throughout Tokyo.

    皆んなが同じ考えを持っていない事を考慮して、

  • Conscious of the fact that not everyone shares the same religion,

    タバコ教を公共の場で歩いている時、 信仰しないように注意書きがあります。

  • there are signs to not openly practice when just walking out and about though.

    要約すると、歩きタバコはダメです。

  • To summarize, smoking while walking is bad,

    でもどうしても吸いたい時は、指定された「聖地」があります。

  • but if you to have to, do it at a designated temple.

    屋内にいる場合は、建物のオーナーの考えに合わせる必要があります。

  • If you're indoors, then follow the proprietor's religion.

    ちょっと1歩下がって「歩く」上でのルールに戻りたいと思います。

  • You know, I'd like to circle back around to the walking rules.

    車のためのルールと違ってそう簡単じゃないですよね?

  • I realized that they're not as easy as the rules for automobiles,

    人間という複雑な物の為のルールと違って

  • because one's a set of rules for people, who are complicated,

    機械はそうではないですよね。

  • and the other is a rule for machines, which aren't.

    自転車は「機械」ですから、それに関するルールも簡単なはずですよね。

  • Bicycles are machines, so surely the rules for them will also be simple.

    道路は車のため、だから自転車もそうですよね。

  • Roads are for vehicles, so bikes go there.

    ほら、道路表示もそう言っているじゃないか!

  • See, the markings say so!

    歩道は違いますので、歩行者はこちらを渡ります

  • Sidewalks are not, so pedestrians go there.

    この方はルールを守っていますね。良い人ですね〜。

  • And this guys is following the rules, good guy!

    たった今、自分の論理にある間違いに気づきました。

  • I have now realized the error in my logic.

    車は人力によって動いている物ではないので、道路を渡る必要があります。

  • Cars are not human powered vehicles, so they have to go on the road,

    しかし、自転車は人の力によって動かされています。

  • but bikes are human powered,

    ですので、道路でも遊歩道の上でも渡れます!

  • so they can go on the sidewalk or the road!

    実際、幾つかの遊歩道には特別な表示があります。

  • In fact, some sidewalks have special markings on them

    自転車そして歩行者はどこを渡るかを示すために。

  • to show where bikes go and where pedestrians go.

    例えば、ここでは自転車は右、歩行者は左ですね。

  • For example, bikes are on the right, humans on the left.

    あの方は・・・・機械的な物を持っているので自転車レーンを渡っても良いんでしょうね。

  • I mean that guy had a kind of machine, so he's allowed in the bike lane.

    でもこの女性は・・・

  • This lady though...

    平然とルールを破っていますね!

  • woh, she's clearly and brazenly breaking the rules.

    この人たちも。

  • As are these people.

    横断歩道を渡るときも

  • When you're at a crosswalk,

    歩行者と自転車の区切りは明確にされています。

  • there are also clear divisions for pedestrians and cyclists.

    守る人はそうそういませんが・・・・。

  • Not that anyone cares.

    この線を引いた人たちは、

  • Obviously, these road painters have figured out

    自転車レーンを指定しても意味がないと気づき、上塗りしたみたいです。

  • that there's no point in having a dedicated bicycle lane and drew over it.

    自転車についてのルールを守ることは日本人の強みではないですが、

  • While following rules around bicycle riding is not a strong suit of the Japanese people,

    パーキングルールは守ります。

  • they do like to follow parking rules.

    このように

  • See.

    停留禁止の標識があれば、自転車は停めません。

  • No parking sign, no bikes parked.

    このゴミ・・・については知りませんが。

  • The garbage... I don't know about that.

    ここもそうですね。標識があれば自転車は無い。

  • Another sign, yet again, no bikes.

    ここはちょっと違いますが。

  • Except for over here.

    ここも。

  • And here.

    ここもですね。間違えました、どこもかしこも停めているみたいですね。

  • And here. Fine, basically everywhere.

    自転車撤去事業に手を出してみようかな?

  • I have to get myself into the bike towing business.

    仕事はたくさんあるでしょう。

  • Clearly lots to be had.

    ここで、ロードコーンの登場です。

  • And that's where the humble traffic cone comes into play.

    このコーンは日本でよく見かけます。

  • Japanese love their cones.

    ほら、このサイクリストはどのルールを破ったとしても

  • See, this cyclist clearly knows that no matter what rules he breaks,

    このコーンのエリアを渡ってはいけないと知っています。

  • there's no crossing the cone barrier when you're not supposed to.

    日本人がコーンを服従するのをうまく使って

  • To take advantage of the Japanese person's deference to the cone,

    ここでは、標識も張っています。

  • you'll even see signs attached to them.

    でもコーンは自転車を整理するためだけに使われている訳ではないです。

  • But cones aren't only used to manage bikes.

    違います。

  • Oh no!

    コーンはルールを施行するために色んな場所で使われます。

  • They're there to enforce rules everywhere.

    注意を促すために使われたり

  • They're there as a message of caution.

    違う場所に立つように促したり。

  • They're used to tell people not to stand somewhere.

    自販機を使う人と使わない人の境界を示したり。

  • They can demark the lines between vending machine users and non-vending machine users.

    また、工事現場でよく見かけます。

  • And yeah, you also see them used in construction, which there's always a lot of.

    夜中では電灯が点いたり!

  • At night they can even light up!

    綺麗ですね。

  • So pretty.

    ここで見たように、コーンは日本ではルールを作っています。

  • So cones are clearly what rules it all in Japan.

    だってさ、

  • I mean...

    ここでは、公園の真ん中で、間には木しかないけど

  • these cones are in the middle of the park between two trees and nothing else,

    間違えても近くには行こうとはしませんでした。

  • but you can bet your bottom dollar that I didn't go near there,

    他の日本人も全く近寄ろうともしませんでした。

  • nor did I see any Japanese people come within spitting distance.

    もう一つ、守るのが簡単なルールを紹介します。

  • Here's another easy rule to follow.

    列を見かけたら入りましょう。

  • If you see a line, get in it.

    特に近くに食べ物があるみたいだったら。

  • Especially if it appears near somewhere that has food.

    列があるっていう事は美味しいってことだろ?

  • Because it has to be good, right?

    だけど僕には、列のある食堂は絶対に避ける、というルールがあるんだ

  • Except for me, my rule is to avoid food lines with a ten foot pole...

    子供達が気にしなければ僕も気にしないが

  • except when my kids don't.

    けど、電車を待っている時に列に並ぶのは得策だね。

  • But standing in line is a good idea when waiting for a train.

    乗客が先に降りてから、電車に乗るとスムーズに物事が進みます。

  • It all works nicely when you let passengers get off before you get on.

    電車内での携帯使用にもルールがあります:こちらでは使わないべきです。

  • There are rules about using cell phones on trains, don't use them in this area.

    他のエリアでの暗黙の了解は、

  • But the unwritten rule of the train, is that if you're in any other area,

    携帯を使う場合、周りの人たちを見ないこと。

  • you should use one and avoid looking at all the other humans.

    興味深いことに、日本でもあまりルールが定められていないところは

  • Interestingly, a part of Japan that doesn't have a lot of rules

    建物の区画法です。

  • is the zoning laws for buildings.

    結果として大きいビルの隣に小さいビルが並ぶこともあります。

  • This can result in getting huge buildings next to small little ones,

    このお寺のように。

  • like this Buddhist temple.

    この小さいお寺の隣にある大きな工事現場や。

  • Or this huge construction site surrounding this one.

    そしておまけとして、3階建ての

  • And for good measure, here's a Shinto shrine,

    オフィスビルの隣に建っている神社をお見せします。

  • in front of a 3-storey house, next to a commercial office building.

    既定としては、区画法では様々な使用を許可しています。

  • By default, many zones allow mixed use,

    ですので、神社、自宅兼オフィス、学校、オフィルビル

  • so whether it's a shrine, small home based business, school, office building,

    メーカー、高層ビル、などが同じ場所でちゃんと存続しています。

  • manufacturer, or high-rise tower, then can all happily co-exist.

    法律は国が決めているので、外国のように「地域のイメージ低下につながる

  • Because laws are nationally based, there's not a lot of nimbyism,

    建築の反対運動」はそれほど見かけません。

  • not in my backyard, that can go on.

    また、どんなサイズの土地にでも建設できます。

  • You can also build virtually on any size lot,

    ですので、このような、高くて細いビルなどが建ちます。

  • so you'll end up with tall, skinny buildings like this.

    この素晴らしい点は、このように小さな路地がどこもかしこも見られます。

  • And a lovely aspect of this, is that you'll find little alleyways all over the place.

    都心を冒険したい方にとっては夢のようですね。

  • An urban explorer's dream.

    また、外見上の設計基準がないため、

  • And since there are not really any cosmetic design standards to adhere to,

    こちらのような、結構独特的なビルがあります。

  • you can get some quite creative buildings like these.

    ビルとビルの間にあまりスペースが無い上、多くの人が住んでいるので

  • Because there is little space between buildings, and many people live on top of each other,

    「うるさい」趣味を持つことは難しいです。

  • it's often difficult to pursue noisy hobbies.

    幸いにも、この公園でそういった趣味を行えます。

  • Thankfully, you can do what you like in parks.

    とはいえど、幾つかルールはあります。

  • Well, you DO have to follow some rules.

    花火は禁止。

  • No fireworks,

    犬の糞は持ち帰る。

  • clean up after your dog,

    鳩への餌やりは禁止。洗濯とかに糞を撒き散らすので助長すべきでは無いです。

  • no feeding pigeons, because they'll pooh all over your laundry and you shouldn't encourage them.

    鳩が自分で餌を見つけるのは大丈夫です。

  • But if they feed themselves, that's alright.

    ゴミの持ち帰りは良いルールですね。

  • Take home your own rubbish is a good one.

    幸いにも多くの人がそれを実践しています。

  • Luckily this one's followed the majority of the time.

    犬は禁止です。念のために復唱します。

  • No dogs. No dogs again, just to make it clear.

    商業用の写真はダメだって?

  • What, no commercial photo shoots!

    ユーチューブは大丈夫かな?(汗)

  • Does YouTubing count?

    あちゃー、またルール破っちゃったかも。

  • Uh oh... I may have just broke another rule.

    でも、公園はガス抜きとして機能しています。

  • But really, parks serve as a release valve.

    小さい家にずっといる方々が思い思いの趣味に講じる機会です。

  • It's a chance for those pent up in small residences to pursue their hobbies.

    制約のある公園もありますが、川岸にも行けるし

  • While some parks do have restrictions, you can find riverbanks,

    代々木公園のように大きい公園は結構寛容です・・・。

  • or big parks like Yoyogi, which are more permissive....

    決められた事項に対しては。

  • for the right things.

    サッカーはダメだって?本当に??

  • No soccer! Come on! Seriously!

    代々木は大きい所なのに、なんで!?

  • Yoyogi is a huge place, what's up with that!

    でも、他にも沢山できる事があります。ギターを弾いたり、

  • But you can do lots of stuff, like play your guitar.

    ダンスの練習も出来ます。

  • You can practice your dancing.

    演技にも挑戦できます。

  • You can have a go at acting.

    気が向いたなら、トムクルーズを演じる事が出来ます。

  • If you want, you can even act like Tom Cruise.

    僕の一番好きなルールは、全対応できるのですが、他人の邪魔にならないように、です。

  • My favourite rule is the catch-all one, make sure you don't do anything to disturb others,

    これは日本での黄金律です。

  • which is really the golden rule of Japan.

    公園によっては焚き火は禁止されていますが、

  • While some parks don't allow for open fires,

    管理された火はこういった路地では幸いにも許可されています。

  • thankfully, controlled fires are allowed in little alleyways like this.

    区画法と同じく、日本の食品安全法はアメリカとカナダと比べて面倒な物では無いです。

  • Like zoning laws, food safety laws are less onerous than those found in the U.S. and Canada.

    ですので、このように数席しか無いお店があったり

  • What this allows for is small little businesses that only have a few seats

    1種類の食べ物に特化したお店があります。

  • and specialize in a single type of food.

    職人が持っているルールは

  • One rule shokunin, Japanese artisans have,

    何事にも完璧を目指すことです、

  • is that you're always trying to get things perfect,

    それが不可能だと分かっていたとしても。

  • although they know it cannot be achieved.

    もう一つのルールは、綺麗に盛り付けされた料理は美味しく感じることです。

  • Another rule is that food tastes better when presented nicely.

    これには議論の余地が無いですね。

  • Can't argue with that.

    美味しい料理を食べたカロリーを消費するため、日本でとても人気のあるスポーツ、ジョギングをしましょう。

  • And to burn off those tasty food calories, running is an immensely popular sport in Japan.

    ここは東京にある皇居で、ここでの決まりは反時計回りに走る事です。

  • We're at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo and apparently the rule is to run counterclockwise.

    でも、それを破る人はたくさん見かけます。

  • But I have plenty of evidence of rule breakers.

    ここでは脚を見せてはいけないという暗黙のルールがあるみたいですね。

  • There must also be an unwritten rule about not showing your legs because...

    ほら、ご覧ください。

  • well, just look for yourself.

    ですのでこの人たちはマナー違反をしているみたいですね。

  • So it seems clear these people here are committing some type of faux pas,

    マナー違反はフォー・パー(faux pas)

  • which is French for misstep,

    と英語で知られています。こちらはフランス語の言葉ですね。

  • because they're just not putting their best foot forward.

    ルールやそれを破る人をよくおちょくっていますが、