Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Let me tell you about rock snot.

    翻訳: Chiyoko Tada 校正: Masaki Yanagishita

  • Since 1992, Dr. Max Bothwell,

    「石鼻汁(いしはなじる)」について お話ししましょう

  • a Government of Canada scientist,

    カナダ政府機関の科学者

  • has been studying a type of algae that grows on rocks.

    マックス・ボスウェル博士は

  • Now, the very unscientific term for that algae is rock snot,

    石に生える ある種の藻類を 1992年から研究しています

  • because as you can imagine,

    この藻類の非科学的な名称が 「石鼻汁」です

  • it looks a lot like snot.

    何故かと言うと— 想像できるかと思いますが

  • But scientists also call it Didymosphenia geminata

    鼻水にとても似ているからです

  • and for decades, this algae has been sliming up riverbeds

    科学者の間では Didymosphenia geminataとも呼ばれ

  • around the world.

    この藻は何十年にも渡り

  • The problem with this algae

    世界中の川底を覆い尽くしています

  • is that it is a threat to salmon, to trout

    この藻の問題なのは

  • and the river ecosystems it invades.

    サケやマスの生存や

  • Now, it turns out Canada's Dr. Bothwell

    繁殖した川のエコシステムを 脅やかすからです

  • is actually a world expert in the field,

    実は カナダのボスウェル博士は

  • so it was no surprise in 2014

    この分野の世界的権威であり

  • when a reporter contacted Dr. Bothwell

    2014年にある記者が

  • for a story on the algae.

    この藻類についての記事を書くにあたって

  • The problem was, Dr. Bothwell wasn't allowed to speak to the reporter,

    取材を依頼したのは当然のことでした

  • because the government of the day wouldn't let him.

    問題は ボスウェル博士は 取材に応じることを許されなかったことです

  • 110 pages of emails

    当時の政府が 博士が記者と話すことを 禁じていたからです

  • and 16 government communication experts

    110ページに及ぶメールのやり取りと

  • stood in Dr. Bothwell's way.

    16人の政府広報機関の専門家が

  • Why couldn't Dr. Bothwell speak?

    ボスウェル博士の前に 立ちはだかっていました

  • Well, we'll never know for sure,

    ボスウェル博士が話すのは 何故 許されなかったのか?

  • but Dr. Bothwell's research did suggest

    その理由が明らかになることは ないでしょう

  • that climate change may have been responsible

    ただ ボスウェル博士の研究は

  • for the aggressive algae blooms.

    気候変動が原因で 藻が急激に繁殖した可能性を

  • But who the heck would want to stifle climate change information, right?

    示唆していました

  • Yes, you can laugh.

    一体どこの誰が 気候変動に関した情報をもみ消しますか?

  • It's a joke,

    そう 笑ってもいいです

  • because it is laughable.

    これは実際に笑いごとのような話で

  • We know that climate change is suppressed for all sorts of reasons.

    呆れるほどおかしいことだからです

  • I saw it firsthand when I was a university professor.

    気候変動の事実は 様々な理由で抑圧されます

  • We see it when countries pull out of international climate agreements

    私も大学教授だった頃 目の当たりにしました

  • like the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Accord,

    事実の抑圧は 気候変動に関する多国間合意である—

  • and we see it when industry fails to meet its emissions reduction targets.

    京都議定書やパリ協定から 国が脱退する時や

  • But it's not just climate change information that's being stifled.

    産業界が排出削減基準の目標を 達成できない時にも 生じます

  • So many other scientific issues are obscured by alternate facts,

    ところが気候変動の情報だけが 阻害されているわけではありません

  • fake news and other forms of suppression.

    他にもたくさんの科学的な問題が 「もう一つの事実」や

  • We've seen it in the United Kingdom,

    フェイクニュースや その他の抑圧手段で覆い隠されています

  • we've seen it in Russia,

    その実例は英国

  • we've seen it in the United States

    ロシアや

  • and, until 2015,

    アメリカ合衆国でも見られ

  • right here in Canada.

    2015年までは

  • In our modern technological age,

    ここカナダでもありました

  • when our very survival depends on discovery,

    テクノロジーの時代である現代

  • innovation and science,

    私達人類の生存が新たな発見や

  • it is critical, absolutely critical,

    イノベーションと科学の発展に かかっている今

  • that our scientists are free to undertake their work,

    極めて重要なのは

  • free to collaborate with other scientists,

    科学者らが束縛を受けずに研究をし

  • free to speak to the media

    他の科学者と共同研究ができて

  • and free to speak to the public.

    メディアにも

  • Because after all,

    一般市民にも自由に発言できることです

  • science is humanity's best effort at uncovering the truth

    その理由は

  • about our world,

    科学は われわれの世界について

  • about our very existence.

    そして 人間存在そのものについて

  • Every new fact that is uncovered

    真実を発見するための 人類にとって最良の営為だからです

  • adds to the growing body of our collective knowledge.

    新しい事実が発見される度に

  • Scientists must be free to explore

    人類の集合的知識に付加されます

  • unconventional or controversial topics.

    科学者には研究を追求する自由が必要です

  • They must be free to challenge the thinking of the day

    たとえそれが型破りで 論議を呼ぶようなテーマであっても

  • and they must be free

    科学者には 既存の見解に挑戦する自由が必要で

  • to present uncomfortable or inconvenient truths,

    気まずく不都合な事実でも

  • because that's how scientists push boundaries

    公表できる自由がなくてはなりません

  • and pushing boundaries is, after all, what science is all about.

    そうすることで科学者は 限界を押し広げます

  • And here's another point:

    それが科学の本来の務めだからです

  • scientists must be free to fail,

    さらにもう一点

  • because even a failed hypothesis teaches us something.

    科学者には失敗する自由も 必要です

  • And the best way I can explain that is through one of my own adventures.

    失敗に終わった仮説からも 学べることがあるからです

  • But first I've got to take you back in time.

    その例を一番良く表している 私自身の冒険について話します

  • It's the early 1900s

    その前に ちょっと昔にさかのぼります

  • and Claire and Vera are roommates in southern Ontario.

    1900年代初頭

  • One evening during the height of the Spanish flu pandemic,

    クレアとヴェラは オンタリオ州南部に住むルームメート同士でした

  • the two attend a lecture together.

    スペイン風邪が大流行した さなかのある夜

  • The end of the evening, they head for home and for bed.

    二人はある講義を聴きに出かけました

  • In the morning, Claire calls up to Vera

    講義が終わると 二人は帰宅し 床に就きました

  • and says she's going out to breakfast.

    翌朝 クレアはヴェラに呼びかけ

  • When she returns a short while later,

    朝食を食べに出ると伝えます

  • Vera wasn't up.

    少し経って戻ると

  • She pulls back the covers

    ヴェラはまだ起きていません

  • and makes the gruesome discovery.

    クレアはベッドの布団をめくると

  • Vera was dead.

    陰惨な光景を目にします

  • When it comes to Spanish flu,

    ヴェラが死んでいたのです

  • those stories are common,

    スペイン風邪のことに関して

  • of lightning speed deaths.

    このような話はよく聴くものです

  • Well, I was a professor in my mid-20s

    稲妻の速さで突然訪れる死

  • when I first heard those shocking facts

    私が大学教授だった20代半ばの頃

  • and the scientist in me wanted to know why and how.

    このショッキングな事実を初めて聞き

  • My curiosity would lead me to a frozen land

    私の科学者としての部分が その理由と原因を知りたがりました

  • and to lead an expedition

    私の好奇心が 氷で覆われた土地へと私を導き

  • to uncover the cause of the 1918 Spanish flu.

    1918年のスペイン風邪の 原因を解明する

  • I wanted to test our current drugs against one of history's deadliest diseases.

    遠征調査が始まりました

  • I hoped we could make a flu vaccine

    既存の医薬品を 歴史上最も致命的な病気に試そうと思いました

  • that would be effective against the virus

    私の狙いは

  • and mutation of it,

    このウイルスと その変異型ウイルスに効果のある

  • should it ever return.

    インフルエンザワクチンを開発し

  • And so I led a team, a research team,

    この病気の再来に備えることでした

  • of 17 men

    そこで私はあるチーム —

  • from Canada, Norway, the United Kingdom

    カナダ、ノルウェー、英国 アメリカ合衆国からの

  • and the United States

    17人の男性メンバーからなる

  • to the Svalbard Islands in the Arctic Ocean.

    研究グループを率い

  • These islands are between Norway and the North Pole.

    北極海のスヴァールバル諸島へと 遠征しました

  • We exhumed six bodies

    スヴァールバル諸島は ノルウェーと北極の間にあります

  • who had died of Spanish flu and were buried in the permafrost

    スペイン風邪で死んだ後 永久凍土に埋められた

  • and we hoped the frozen ground would preserve the body and the virus.

    6体の遺体を掘りだしました

  • Now, I know what you are all waiting for,

    凍土が死体とウイルスを 保全していることを期待しました

  • that big scientific payoff.

    ここで皆さんが期待しているのは

  • But my science story doesn't have that spectacular Hollywood ending.

    科学的な大成果だと思います

  • Most don't.

    残念ながら 私の科学に関する物語には 映画のような結末はありませんでした

  • Truth is, we didn't find the virus,

    大部分の科学の物語はそうです

  • but we did develop new techniques

    実際 ウイルスは見つかりませんでした

  • to safely exhume bodies

    その代わりに ウイルスに感染した可能性のある死体を

  • that might contain virus.

    安全に掘り起こす

  • We did develop new techniques

    新しい技術を開発しました

  • to safely remove tissue

    ウイルスが含まれている可能性のある組織を

  • that might contain virus.

    安全に取り除く

  • And we developed new safety protocols

    技術も開発しました

  • to protect our research team and the nearby community.

    研究員や近隣のコミュニティを守る

  • We made important contributions to science

    新しい安全手順も開発できました

  • even though the contributions we made

    当初想定していた科学的発見には

  • were not the ones originally intended.

    結びつきませんでしたが

  • In science, attempts fail,

    違う意味での科学への 重要な貢献はできました

  • results prove inconclusive

    科学の世界では 試みが失敗し

  • and theories don't pan out.

    決定的な結論に至らない 場合もあり

  • In science,

    理論が当てはまらないこともあります

  • research builds upon the work and knowledge of others,

    科学の世界で 研究は

  • or by seeing further,

    他人の研究や知識の上に展開し あるいはそこから更に

  • by standing on the shoulders of giants,

    先を展望することです

  • to paraphrase Newton.

    「巨人の肩(先人の業績)の上に立つこと」

  • The point is, scientists must be free

    ニュートンの言葉を借りると そう言うことです

  • to choose what they want to explore,

    重要なのは 科学者は自由に

  • what they are passionate about

    探求しようと思うものを選択できること

  • and they must be free to report their findings.

    情熱を傾けるものを選べること

  • You heard me say

    その結果を自由に発表できることです

  • that respect for science started to improve in Canada in 2015.

    先程私は カナダでは2015年から

  • How did we get here?

    科学を尊重する態度に 改善が見られるようになったと言いました

  • What lessons might we have to share?

    どうやってそこに到達したのでしょう?

  • Well, it actually goes back to my time as a professor.

    私たちの教訓から共有すべきことは 何でしょう?

  • I watched while agencies, governments and industries around the world

    それは私が教授だった時代に戻ります

  • suppressed information on climate change.

    私は世界中の研究機関 政府や産業界が

  • It infuriated me.

    気候変動に関する情報を 隠蔽する様子を目の当たりにしました

  • It kept me up at night.

    私は激怒しました

  • How could politicians twist scientific fact for partisan gain?

    夜も眠れませんでした

  • So I did what anyone appalled by politics would do:

    何故 政治家は政党に利するため 科学的事実を歪曲するのか?

  • I ran for office, and I won.

    そこで私は 政治に嫌悪感を覚えた人なら 誰でもとる選択をしました

  • (Applause)

    公職に立候補し 当選したのです

  • I thought I would use my new platform

    (拍手)

  • to talk about the importance of science.

    私はこの新しい立場を使い

  • It quickly became a fight for the freedom of science.

    科学の重要性を伝えようと思いました

  • After all, I was a scientist, I came from the world under attack,

    その任務はアッと言う間に 科学の自由のための戦いとなりました

  • and I had personally felt the outrage.

    元来 私は科学者で 攻撃の標的である分野の出で

  • I could be a voice for those who were being silenced.

    個人的に激しい怒りを感じていました

  • But I quickly learned that scientists were nervous,

    私が 沈黙させられている人達の 声になれると思いました

  • even afraid to talk to me.

    ところがすぐに 科学者が皆 神経質になっていると分かりました

  • One government scientist, a friend of mine,

    私に話をすることさえも 警戒していました

  • we'll call him McPherson,

    私の友人で ある政府機関の科学者は

  • was concerned about the impact

    —マクファーソン氏とでも呼びましょう

  • government policies were having on his research

    政策が彼の研究に与えている影響と

  • and the state of science deteriorating in Canada.

    カナダにおける科学の状況悪化を

  • He was so concerned, he wrote to me

    懸念していました

  • from his wife's email account

    その心配があまりにも深刻になり

  • because he was afraid a phone call could be traced.

    自分の妻のメールアカウントを使い 私にメールしてきました

  • He wanted me to phone his wife's cell phone

    電話だと探し出されるかもしれないと 恐れていました

  • so that call couldn't be traced.

    彼の妻の電話に連絡して欲しい

  • I only wish I were kidding.

    自分の電話が探知されないように とのことでした

  • It quickly brought what was happening in Canada into sharp focus for me.

    これが冗談であればと真剣に思います

  • How could my friend of 20 years be that afraid to talk to me?

    この出来事からカナダで起きていることが 一気に鮮明になりました

  • So I did what I could at the time.

    20年来の友人が これほど私に話すことを 恐れるのは何故なのか?

  • I listened and I shared what I learned

    そこで私は その時点でできる 処置をとりました

  • with my friend in Parliament,

    彼の話を聞き その内容から得た事実を

  • a man who was interested in all things environment, science,

    国会の議員仲間で

  • technology, innovation.

    環境 科学 テクノロジー イノベーションの分野のことならば

  • And then the 2015 election rolled around

    全てのことに興味を示す友人に 共有しました

  • and our party won.

    それから2015年の選挙が訪れ

  • And we formed government.

    私たちの政党が勝利しました

  • And that friend of mine

    新政府が発足しました

  • is now the Prime Minister of Canada, Justin Trudeau.

    その議員だった友人は

  • (Applause)

    現在カナダの首相を務める ジャスティン・トルドーです

  • And he asked if I would serve as his Minister of Science.

    (拍手)

  • Together, with the rest of the government,

    彼が私を科学大臣に任命しました

  • we are working hard to restore science to its rightful place.

    それから一緒に その他の政府機関と協力し

  • I will never forget that day in December 2015

    科学を正当な場所に 再度位置付ける努力をしています

  • when I proudly stood in Parliament

    私は2015年12月のあの日を 一生忘れません

  • and proclaimed,

    私が国会で立ち

  • "The war on science is now over."

    こう宣言したこと—

  • (Applause)

    「科学を脅かす戦いは 終りました」

  • And I have worked hard to back up those words with actions.

    (拍手)

  • We've had many successes.

    その宣言を 行動で裏付けるよう 精力を尽くしました

  • There's still more work to do,

    多くの成功を収めてきました

  • because we're building this culture shift.

    まだまだやることも多く残っています

  • But we want our government scientists to talk to the media, talk to the public.

    私たちは 文化の革新を 進めているからです

  • It'll take time, but we are committed.

    私たちが望むのは 政府機関の科学者が メディアや公衆と対話することです

  • After all, Canada is seen as a beacon for science internationally.

    時間はかかりますが そうなることを約束します

  • And we want to send a message

    なんと言っても カナダは国際社会から 科学の導き手と見られています

  • that you do not mess with something so fundamental,

    私達はメッセージを発信したいと思います—

  • so precious, as science.

    科学のように 人類にとって 根源的かつ貴重なものに

  • So, for Dr. Bothwell, for Claire and Vera,

    みだりに介入してはいけません

  • for McPherson and all those other voices,

    ですからボスウェル博士や クレアやヴェラや

  • if you see that science is being stifled, suppressed or attacked,

    マクファーソンやその他多数の声の為に

  • speak up.

    科学が外部から干渉を受け 抑圧され 攻撃されるのを見た時には

  • If you see that scientists are being silenced, speak up.

    声をあげてください

  • We must hold our leaders to account.

    科学者が沈黙させられているのを見たら 声をあげてください

  • Whether that is by exercising our right to vote,

    私たちは指導者の責任を問うべきです

  • whether it is by penning an op-ed in a newspaper

    それは投票する権利を行使したり

  • or by starting a conversation on social media,

    新聞の意見欄に投稿したり

  • it is our collective voice that will ensure the freedom of science.

    ソーシャルメディアを通して対話を 始めることでできることです

  • And after all, science is for everyone,

    私たちの団結した声があってこそ 科学の自由が確保できます

  • and it will lead to a better, brighter, bolder future for us all.

    何といっても 科学は全ての人間の為にあり

  • Thank you.

    人類によりよく 明るい より勇気ある未来をもたらすからです

  • (Applause)

    ありがとうございました

Let me tell you about rock snot.

翻訳: Chiyoko Tada 校正: Masaki Yanagishita

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED カナダ 博士 ウイルス クレア 自由

TED】カースティ・ダンカン科学者は自由に学び、発言し、挑戦しなければならない (科学者は自由に学び、発言し、挑戦しなければならない|カースティ・ダンカン) (【TED】Kirsty Duncan: Scientists must be free to learn, to speak and to challenge (Scientists must be free to learn, to speak and to challenge | Kirsty Duncan))

  • 322 25
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語