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  • Is teaching us when life is?

  • To prepare [us] to equip us

  • and

  • That the deepest pleasure of the theater is learning without being taught

  • What makes a great screenwriter somebody with something to say?

  • You have to make sense out of life

  • And this is why most people can't do it because they can't make that sense out of life let alone make sense out of life

  • And then express it in writing

  • Telling Story

  • beautifully

  • Is Meaningful because it makes life a little less painful?

  • It makes life, just a little more livable

  • So people who want to write on their champion?

  • And I would do my best to help them understand what they're up to because I know that without them

  • life would be unlivable [I]

  • Noticed your mug here. It says journey Journey is a euphemism for

  • the struggle of Life

  • Life is an uphill battle

  • [its] sisyphus pushing that rock okay is not a journey

  • This week on the [show] we have Robert mcKee who is a legend in Hollywood

  • He's been teaching people how to write screenplays for the past 30 years

  • 50,000 students over 60 of them have won academy awards over 140 of them have won Emmy awards

  • He really is the godfather of this business with people like Peter Jackson of the Hobbit Kirk Douglas and the entire pixar team

  • Saying that he is the man and we had him in studio

  • I'm actually attending his course this weekend as well because story is so important in our lives because it helps us

  • Explain this reality called life and the suffering that we go through as humans and if you can understand how to create story

  • You can understand a life better business better everything and look Robert is the [og]

  • He's 76 years old, and he's still touring like a Madman

  • London La Berlin, New York City he is teaching students on a regular basis, and he was actually featured in the movie adaptation

  • with Nicolas cage as a guy who was

  • Swearing on stage and really beating the heck out of people that want to be writers

  • I really enjoyed my time [with] Robert, and I know you're going to enjoy this very special interview

  • He does not sit [down] with many people

  • for very long

  • and he really drops science about trump about what it takes to be a writer about what story is all about and even

  • Wants to change the [tagline] of London real from it's about the Journey - it's about the struggle and I

  • Appreciate that from Robert and if you want to get involved in some more struggle

  • Join us for the life accelerator program which is finishing on Friday jump in for six weeks of training Rahmatu t [-] about mindfulness

  • Mindset your diet your movement patterns relationships and how to be successful for the rest of the year

  • It's an amazing course so jump in now inside the academy and now I leave you with an amazing story by Robert mcKee

  • This is London real

  • I am brian [rose] my guest today is Robert mcKee who has lectured on storytelling for three decades

  • And whose [books] story is the bible for screenwriters TV writers and entertainment executives like myself?

  • Your former students include 63 academy award winners

  • 164 Emmy Award winners and 30 writers guild of America Award winners with names like Peter Jackson The Hobbit Trilogy

  • The Actor Kirk Douglas the Author Steven Pressfield and the entire team at Pixar singing your praises

  • You were famously played by Brian cox in the film adaptation [when] nicolas cage and have also appeared on the simpsons your book dialogue

  • The art of verbal actions per page stage and screen was released last year to critical acclaim and your book character is coming soon

  • I hope I will be attending your three-day story seminar this weekend in London

  • I've got my casablanca screenplay printed out Robert welcome to London

  • Thank you Brian remember you are no [stranger] to this city

  • And I was wondering if you could tell us about the time you spent here

  • and what london means to story [theater] everything all my

  • my love affair with London goes back the

  • mid-60s, [I] was artist-in-residence at the national theatre when it was a at the old vic and

  • Olivier was artistic director

  • and I

  • remember

  • [I] flew we used to call icelandic Airlines and storm door company

  • we flew from from New York to Maine to Helsinki and I mean to a

  • Iceland and then on to London [and]

  • Just to get here. Yeah just to get here and I got in a cab and

  • I was driving into the city and I was I was bouncing up and down

  • In the back seat [of] the cab screaming at the driver things like is that the thames?

  • Is that the thames is the actual actual thames? You know is that big ben's happy you know and

  • I realized I was supposed building could have been more more electrified by it and

  • and then

  • Some years later. I moved here and

  • I lived in London, and then I bought a

  • place in a boss castle Cornwall and

  • I had for a [decade]. I had a the ideal life of City country going back and forth

  • Two weeks one plays two weeks [in] the next

  • And it was a beautiful life and that

  • the reason

  • you know I would want to live in London if I would do it again if I if it were possible is the theater

  • its I grew up in the theatre I spent my first half of my professional life on stage and directing dear and

  • The theatre in London is just the best in the world New York is fine. I'm sure Paris is fine, but

  • it's just there's look virtually no comparison and

  • when I go to plays in New York, this is really fat Peevish, but it's fact I

  • understand

  • 60 70 percent of what is said from the stage?

  • Because American actors known

  • about [your] Mantini sign

  • and when I come [to] London

  • people pronounce their final consonants you you know English is a

  • Consonant language, and so you can understand. What is being said?

  • and

  • because they're trained and

  • and the acting over overall is always great, so

  • I love this town. It's the most I think it's I

  • Think London is is beautiful

  • Physically beautiful. I know this you know sounds blasphemous, but I think London is far more [beautiful] than Paris

  • [Paris] is repetitious. I mean everything Emma street looks like every other street after a while. I mean and

  • in London is

  • Especially when it's up lit at night

  • it's just breathtaking and the change from the neighborhood the neighborhood from is is as rich and

  • history of all Kinds [and] Modern and English architects are superb and

  • The new Buildings are beautiful. So I have a

  • Laundry list of reasons why if I could I would live here?

  • And we'll speak to your wife and get you over here half a year

  • Do you think the history of theater here produces different kinds of actors then when it comes?

  • Do you know it used to it used to but it's not true anymore

  • when I was working in the [theatre] here in the 60s

  • There was clearly rada Lamda trained actors had

  • the voice you know

  • and

  • and it was difficult for them in many cases to work on screen because they just couldn't get

  • Small enough couldn't clean it down. You know because of that

  • [I] mean both actors start with the same. They bring a character to Life within

  • but the stage actor Gathers up that creation and

  • projects it into the audience the film actor creates within and then invites the camera toward them to look inside and

  • As a film actor [you] don't want to do anything

  • Would push the camera away from you

  • Whereas in the theater, it's the opposite

  • And a lot of butts when I was here in the 60s, just didn't know how to throw the switch, but not anymore

  • Yeah, the [the] quality of acting in

  • The world certainly in the English-speaking world is breathtaking I

  • Think I mean one you know when you go to sit in a play [or] a new TV series comes on

  • And they're wonderful. Hey

  • who are these people you know and they come from the same line a hundred deep at every audition and

  • They are so beautifully prepared to Act roles that will never be written for them

  • immediately the art of writing is

  • Decades behind the art of acting and and I know you know and that these wonderful actors

  • Thanks to the development of long-form television

  • when I saw your game of thrones and the Vikings right I

  • Looked through those casts, and I thought all those guys who thought they were retired

  • right all those old men the veterans of the stage and [then]

  • Now you know playing all these wonderful characters in these these series

  • and so on

  • [I] I do my best to try [to] [to] keep the quality of writing

  • Progressively building over over the time and and and thanks to [long-form] television now

  • the

  • number of really fine characters available to actors is multiplying and

  • so because the writing and long-form television is just

  • Excellent. There's a lot of crack - but the best of the best is just breathtakingly wonderful stuff

  • I mean from the wire to breaking bad to

  • Game of thrones indeed and all that

  • and so so

  • I'm very optimistic because I think

  • regarding the future of writing

  • Because I think long-form television is going to do there

  • they're already doing it they're going to these writers are building the cathedrals of the 21st century a

  • hundred hours of you know

  • when I do

  • Television day which I go there is a couple days from here from now

  • We look at breaking bad as 26 story lines

  • Between the 26 story lines there are 205 acts. [I]

  • Mean that's 205 at work. All right

  • [the] magnitude is just astounding and

  • [Na] what and that was

  • breaking bad these 86 hours

  • So I mean a novel even a you know

  • [900,000] page novel

  • might be one season

  • and now you have seven eight ten seasons of you know often [really] superb quality writing and

  • This I think is going to from hoping will

  • invite really ambitious writers with visions of

  • able to encompass

  • massive works like that

  • Will inspire them to?

  • to want to write

  • Because I know you know writing a novel

  • There's a lot of work and and Iffy

  • Writing for the stage again it if he writing for a screen you make make more money if you sell

  • but you know

  • How many you know most screenwriters who?

  • [are] really good and really busy are getting something to the screen like once every five years?

  • Let's you know. It's hard hard to survive on hard to survive, and they're hard to keep your [lover], but if the enthusiasm [line]

  • the Writers gilded a study once

  • That that for every [twenty] screenplays for which serious money is paid to

  • Option the screen rights only one ever gets me

  • There's a lot of writers. I was one of them in Hollywood for years living on option money

  • Selling what you write regularly, but then watching it perish for various reasons which must crush you in the writer it not be made

  • yeah, it does but

  • There's [a] bunch [screen] [glass] old five times

  • [so] I think this a wonderful business you get to sell things and keep them but

  • The people did love [this] script, and it never gets made last time. It was sold a couple years ago

  • Optioned I called my lawyer I said

  • They want to want to got another deal. He said not. I want I see yeah. [I] said damn you know

  • People read it they [come] all over it, but nobody ever gets pregnant

  • Well said so is this an unheard-of time in human history when it comes to this

  • Long-Form are I think sorry [I] three so we've never written or even early told [always] ever

  • Attempted that kind of magnitude before there's a bible compared to say breaking boundaries

  • so the Bible is a bunch of short stories and

  • There's no through light

  • it keeps changing authors every twenty pages, so

  • Now it's a it said. It's of a magnitude nobody's ever imagined before

  • and

  • consequently there's a

  • What's what's essential in long-form television is complexity of character?

  • what keeps an audience watching a TV series is one of two things either characters are being revealed as

  • Human beings of a kind we never saw in the last three [years] you know long

  • Sunday character does something you realize my God that is true to character

  • But we've never seen that quality that that trait in that character before

  • They're being revealed and or changed

  • Characters arcing better or descending into some degenerating state or whatever, but they're changing for better for worse

  • [and] as long as the characters are being revealed and

  • Land or changed because not all characters [change], but those who do

  • or fascinated it really isn't the storytelling that pulls people through a hundred hours [of] the

  • long-form television, I mean the storytelling is wonderful, but you know but

  • [the] Sopranos for example you know ends with him his family sitting in a restaurant because he's been totally revealed

  • Tony's never going to change the tonys of this world never changed and and everything knowable about him is known

  • [there] end of series right you called that exhaustion

  • That's the character exhaustion and and you at you said that kind of revealed you a new way of ending something. Yeah

  • Until [the] Sopranos I never realized that

  • When it gets to this kind of length this kind of complexity?

  • complication that [um]

  • What we're really watching for is character. I

  • Think [this] is true many novels [to] okay. I mean a lot on our last chapter is not a real true Climax

  • it's a sort of fade out and

  • The characters [are] exhausted and so when I saw some problems I realized

  • That's another way to end ascribe. Just on just just their emptied out. Thank you very much man. Wonderful knowing you

  • Goodbye, and when I think about breaking bad, I mean walter white you're constantly seeing these new aspects of his character

  • He's changing and Jesse's changing and his relationship with his [wife]

  • And you're saying that's what pulls us along not the next drug deal not the next miss of that not much no

  • I mean there are arcs and that in fact it gets so complicated

  • in

  • Long-Form TV that as I said there's [205] acts

  • So after a while an Act is important

  • But not that important so I had to devise a new term and I called movements

  • which is is an act is a major turning point a

  • Story Climax is an absolute turning point so between the Act and the and the story climax

  • Created a movement. Which is a

  • massive

  • turning point

  • Which usually means some kind of compound not only did the character survive life and death

  • but he's now the kingpin of whatever and

  • is found love and I mean a movement Climax is a is a

  • soul is

  • More powerful than an act usually because it compounds change

  • So it's not just

  • One kind of change two or three different kinds of change all happening in the [same] event and so it becomes a movement

  • So I broke [breaking] bad into four movements

  • In order to make sense out of this

  • because

  • Like I said 26 [storylines] and 205 acts you get lost in the forest of it literally

  • And this is something you saw coming. I think 10 or 15 years ago when you look at the state of screenwriting and you said