Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN: From (inaudible) Lake Dallas, Texas is proud to announce that CNN STUDENT NEWS starts right now. Take it away, Carl.

    UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN.テキサス州ダラス湖から CNNニュースが始まります持って行ってくれ カール

  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: What you`re looking at right here, pictures from the nation of Mali.

    CNNNアンカーのカール・アズズですマリの国からの写真です

  • These are police officers on patrol in the capital city.

    首都の街をパトロール中の警察官です。

  • They are getting support from France, and other countries including the U.S are considering getting involved, too.

    フランスからも支援を受けており、アメリカを含めた各国も巻き込みを検討しているという。

  • That is because Malian government forces are fighting against rebels.

    それは、マリアン政府軍が反乱軍と戦っているからです。

  • The rebels are radical Islamic militants.

    反乱軍はイスラム過激派です。

  • They have links to the al-Qaeda terrorist group, they`ve been gaining control of territory in Mali for months now.

    彼らはアルカイダのテロリストグループとつながりがあり...マリの領土を支配しています。

  • We`re going to take a look at where exactly this is happening.

    これがどこで起こっているのかを見てみましょう。

  • On the map here, you`re going to see Mali.

    ここの地図では、マリを見ようとしている。

  • It`s in Western Africa, it`s about twice the size of the U.S. State of Texas, and it`s home to more than 15 million people.

    西アフリカにあり、アメリカのテキサス州の約2倍の大きさで、15000万人以上の人が住んでいる。

  • This conflict started last year when a group of soldiers overthrew the government.

    この紛争は昨年、兵士の集団が政府を転覆させたことから始まった。

  • When that happened, the northern part of the country, which is mostly desert, was kind of left out there on its own.

    そうなると、ほとんどが砂漠である北部は、なんだか勝手に放置されているような状態になってしまいました。

  • And that`s where these militants started their takeover.

    そこが過激派が乗っ取りを始めた場所だ。

  • We mentioned France is already involved in this conflict.

    フランスはすでにこの紛争に巻き込まれていると述べました。

  • They have hundreds of troops on the ground and they are using jets to launch airstrikes on rebel training camps and other targets.

    彼らは地上に数百の軍隊を持っており、ジェット機を使って反乱軍の訓練キャンプや他の目標に向けて空爆を行っています。

  • A spokesman for the rebels says, "the war has only started."

    反乱軍のスポークスマンは、"戦争だけが始まったと言います。

  • Next up, Cuba.

    次はキューバです。

  • The island nation is less than 100 miles away from the U.S., just a short flight or boat ride,

    島国はアメリカから100マイル以下の距離にあり、飛行機や船ですぐに行くことができます。

  • but getting from one country to the other has been severely limited for decades.

    しかし、ある国から他の国への移動は何十年にもわたって厳しく制限されてきました。

  • When Fidel Castro took control of Cuba in 1959, and set up the nation`s communist government,

    フィデル・カストロが1959年にキューバを支配し、共産主義政府を樹立した。

  • he put laws in place that restricted Cubans from traveling outside their country.

    彼はキューバ人の国外旅行を制限する法律を制定しました。

  • So let`s say you lived in Cuba and had a family member who escaped to the United States.

    キューバに住んでいて... アメリカに逃げた家族がいたとしよう。

  • There was a good chance you wouldn`t see that person for years, because you wouldn`t be allowed to leave Cuba.

    キューバを出ることは許されないので、何年もその人に会えない可能性が高い。

  • Fidel`s brother Raul Castro is president now.

    フィデルの弟のラウル・カストロが大統領になった。

  • He`s lifting some of those travel restrictions, although the new rules won`t be the same for all Cubans.

    彼は旅行制限の一部を解除している。新しいルールは全てのキューバ人に同じではないが...

  • PATRICK OPPMANN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Sport stars, doctors and military officials still face restriction, because of the value to Cuban society.

    スポーツ界のスター、医者、軍の役人は、キューバ社会にとっての価値があるために、まだ制限に直面しています。

  • But most Cubans now will be able to stay abroad for up to two years without losing the right to return,

    しかし、今のほとんどのキューバ人は、帰国する権利を失うことなく、最長2年間海外に滞在することができるようになります。

  • and for the first time, can take young children with them.

    と初めて幼い子供たちを連れて行くことができます。

  • Reforms that were welcomed outside this Havana immigration office.

    このハバナの移民局の外で歓迎された改革。

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE (THROUGH TRANSLATOR): This is good, they should have done it years ago.

    UNIDENTIFIED MALE (通訳を介して).これは良いことです、彼らは何年も前にそれを行う必要があります。

  • But at least now things will be easier, I suppose.

    しかし、少なくとも今は、物事は簡単になると思います。

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE (THROUGH TRANSLATOR): I sincerely think Raul is doing things better than his brother,

    UNIDENTIFIED MALE (TRANSLATOR through through TRANSLATOR).ラウルは弟よりも良いことをしていると心から思います。

  • but they left him a lot of problems to fix.

    しかし、彼らは彼に多くの問題を残しました。

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See if you can I.D. me.

    私の身元が分かるかどうか確認してください。

  • I`m located in North America.

    私は北米にいます。

  • I`m home to many species of fish and I provide drinking water to more than 35 million people.

    私は多くの魚種の故郷であり、3500万人以上の人々に飲料水を提供しています。

  • I`m the largest lake group in the world.

    私は世界最大の湖のグループです。

  • I`m the Great Lakes. Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario.

    私は五大湖だスペリオル、ミシガン、ヒューロン、エリー、オンタリオ

  • AZUZ: The water cycle - evaporation and precipitation,

    AZUZ:水の循環 - 蒸発と降水。

  • that`s how the Great Lakes usually work, snow and rain from the region refill the Lakes to make up for the effects of evaporation.

    五大湖が通常どのように機能しているかというと、地域からの雪や雨が蒸発の影響を補うために湖を補充するんだ。

  • But last winter, there wasn`t a lot of snow, and last summer was really hot.

    でも去年の冬は雪が少なかったし、去年の夏は本当に暑かった。

  • That led to this.

    それがきっかけでこうなった。

  • The lakes aren`t any less great, there`s just less lake.

    湖は素晴らしいものではなく、湖が少ないだけだ。

  • Michigan and Huron hit record low levels for December.

    ミシガン州とヒューロン州は12月に過去最低水準を記録した。

  • They could break the all-time low in the next few months.

    今後数ヶ月で史上最安値を更新するかもしれません。

  • It`s not necessarily a new problem.

    それは必ずしも新しい問題ではない。

  • Experts say the Great Lakes levels have been below average for years.

    専門家によると、五大湖の水位はここ何年も平均を下回っているという。

  • Experts say the Great Lakes levels have been below average for years.

    専門家によると、五大湖の水位はここ何年も平均を下回っているという。

  • It is an economic problem.

    経済的な問題です。

  • Lower water levels mean cargo ships that travel along the lakes have to carry less, or they run the risk of running aground.

    水位が低いと、湖に沿って移動する貨物船の運搬量が減るか、座礁の危険性がある。

  • Low levels effect the ability to fish, too, and that means fewer tourists visiting the Great Lakes.

    低レベルは、あまりにも釣りの能力に影響を与え、それは五大湖を訪れる観光客の減少を意味します。

  • JOHN ROBERTS, CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT: Preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.

    ジョン・ロバーツ 最高裁判所最高裁長官 合衆国憲法を保存、保護、防御する。

  • BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.

    バラク・オバマ(アメリカ合衆国大統領):アメリカ合衆国憲法を守り、守り、守る。

  • ROBERTS: So, help you God.

    だから、神を助けてください。

  • OBAMA: So, help me God.

    OBAMA: だから、神を助けてください。

  • ROBERTS: Congratulations, Mr. President.

    おめでとうございます、社長。

  • (CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

    (歓声と拍手)

  • AZUZ: All right. That was the moment four years ago when Barack Obama was sworn in as the 44th president of the United States.

    分かったそれは4年前 バラク・オバマが 第44代大統領として宣誓した瞬間でした

  • After winning reelection last November, he`s getting ready to do that again.

    去年の11月に再選を勝ち取った後、彼は再びそれをする準備をしている。

  • The presidential inauguration is this massive public event.

    大統領就任式は、このような大規模な公的行事です。

  • Organizers want to make sure it goes off without a hitch.

    主催者はそれが無事に終わるようにしたいと思っています。

  • So, they are getting some practicing before the big day.

    ということで、大事な日を前に練習をしているそうです。

  • ATHENA JONES, CNN CORRESPONDENT : We saw the fife and drums practice, the marching band, members of every branch of the military practicing marching in formation.

    ATHENA JONES, CNN CORRESPONDENT : 私たちは、鼓笛や太鼓の練習、マーチングバンド、軍の各支部のメンバーが編隊を組んで行進する練習を見ました。

  • And then we had stand-ins conducting this swearing- in ceremony, , stand-ins for Vice President Biden and President Obama as well as the first lady,

    副大統領とオバマ大統領とファーストレディーの代理がいました

  • and even two little girls standing in for Sasha and Malia Obama.

    そして、サーシャとマリア・オバマのために立っていた二人の少女までも。

  • So, a big day here.

    今日は大事な日だ

  • You know, not as many people are expected this time around as four years ago.

    今回は4年前に比べて期待されている人が少ないんじゃない?

  • But still, quite a crowd.

    それにしても、かなりの人だ。

  • I should mention that the official swearing-in ceremony will take place at the White House on Sunday, January 20,

    なお、正式な宣誓式は1月20日(日)にホワイトハウスで行われることをお伝えしておきます。

  • that`s the constitutionally mandated day that the president must be sworn in.

    大統領が宣誓しなければならない日だ。憲法で定められた日だ。

  • But the big public ceremony will be on Monday,

    しかし、大きな公の場での式典は月曜日に行われます。

  • and we know that the president plans to use a bible, a traveling bible used by the slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr.

    大統領はバイブルを使用する計画を立てています 殺害された公民権運動の指導者である マーティン・ルーサー・キング・ジュニアが 使っていた旅行用のバイブルです

  • As well as the bible that belonged to President Abraham Lincoln,

    エイブラハム・リンカーン大統領が所有していた聖書と同様に。

  • that one`s on loan from the Library of Congress here in Washington.

    それはワシントンの議会図書館から貸し出されている。

  • Athena Jones, CNN, Washington.

    アテナ・ジョーンズ、CNN、ワシントン

  • AZUZ: Teachers, if you are planning on going to Monday`s inauguration, maybe you are taking students.

    先生方、月曜日の就任式に行こうと思っているなら、生徒を連れて行っているのではないでしょうか?

  • If so, we want to hear from you before it happens.

    もしそうであれば、そうなる前に話を聞きたいです。

  • If so, we want to hear from you before it happens.

    もしそうであれば、そうなる前に話を聞きたいです。

  • Go to the frequently asked questions box on our home page.

    ホームページのよくある質問欄に移動します。

  • Click on "How do I send CNN STUDENT NEWS an email," then please, fill out the form, let us know your plans

    クリックしてください"How do I send CNN STUDENT NEWS an email, " then please fill out the form, let us let us know your plans.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mr. Stevermer`s social studies classes at USC High School in Wells, Minnesota.

    UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mr Stevermer`s social studies classes at USC High School in Wells, Minnesota.

  • The prefix "neuro-" refers to what system in the human body?

    接頭語の"neuro-"は、人体のどのようなシステムを指していますか?

  • Here we go - is it the immune system, circulatory system, respiratory system or nervous system?

    さあ、行きましょう - 免疫系なのか、循環器系なのか、呼吸器系なのか、神経系なのか。

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

    あと3秒だ、行け!

  • Neuro refers to the nervous system, which sends impulses between your brain and other parts of your body.

    ニューロとは神経系のことを指し、脳と体の他の部分との間にインパルスを送っています。

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

    That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout.&quot.

  • AZUZ: If you want to study those messages to and from your brain,

    脳からのメッセージを研究したいなら

  • you can use equipment that costs thousands of dollars or you can make your own for less than 100 bucks.

    あなたは何千ドルもの費用がかかる機器を使用したり、100ドル未満のために自分自身を作ることができます。

  • That`s the challenge that a pair of graduate students took on, and what they came up with,

    これは、大学院生のペアが挑戦した課題であり、彼らが考え出したものです。

  • is helping make the study of neuroscience accessible through every day electronics.

    は、毎日の電子機器を通じて、神経科学の研究を身近なものにするための支援をしています。

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: OK, do it again.

    OK, もう一度やってみてください。

  • GREG GAGE, NEUROSCIENTIST: Teachers don`t really have the confidence to actually do hands on neuroscience activities.

    グレッグ・ゲージ 神経科学者教師は実際に神経科学の活動を実践する自信がありません。

  • GREG GAGE, NEUROSCIENTIST: Teachers don`t really have the confidence to actually do hands on neuroscience activities.

    グレッグ・ゲージ 神経科学者教師は実際に神経科学の活動を実践する自信がありません。

  • There`s like a hesitation to do that, because it is like a difficult field.

    難しい分野のようなので、それをすることに躊躇があるようなものです。

  • There`s like a hesitation to do that, because it is like a difficult field.

    難しい分野のようなので、それをすることに躊躇があるようなものです。

  • There`s like a hesitation to do that, because it is like a difficult field.

    難しい分野のようなので、それをすることに躊躇があるようなものです。

  • So, we are trying to make the tools like simple enough that you can do as we use things people are already familiar with, cellphones or laptops.

    だから、私たちは人々がすでに慣れ親しんでいるもの、携帯電話やラップトップを使用しているようにあなたが行うことができるように十分にシンプルなようなツールを作ろうとしています。

  • And then our equipment has one button on it, you just turn it on.

    そして、私たちの機器にはボタンが1つ付いていて、それをオンにするだけです。

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I never knew our muscle will respond like intensely like this.

    私たちの筋肉がこのように激しく反応するとは知りませんでした。

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`ve been enlightened by the neuroscience, I`ve been enlightened like how our brain functions. I have a better understanding of muscles and brain.

    UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`ve been enlightened by the neuroscience, I`ve been enlightened like how our brain functions.私は筋肉と脳のより良い理解を持っています。

  • GAGE: I`m Greg Gage. I`m a DIY neuroscientist, and I co-founded Backyard Brains.

    ゲージグレッグ・ゲイジです。私はDIYの神経科学者で、バックヤード・ブレインズを共同設立しました。

  • So, once the circuit boards are built, and we have the enclosure,

    ということで、一度回路基板を作って、筐体を手に入れたら

  • we do a final assembly and then we put this acrylic on the top and we sandwich these together.

    最終的な組み立てをして、上にアクリルを乗せて、これを挟み込むんだ。

  • And it`s good to go.

    これで、行っても大丈夫だよ。

  • This is brand-new stuff, I mean this - this is what allows us to do neuroscience with the actual human being.

    これは全く新しいもので、これはつまり、実際の人間を使って神経科学を行うことを可能にするものなのです。

  • And we just made it so that you can actually have pads,

    そして、実際にパッドを持つことができるようにしただけです。

  • that you can actually put into your muscles and you record the electricity that is coming from your brain down to your axons,

    実際に筋肉に入れて、脳から軸索までの電気を記録します。

  • anterior muscles and as you record that voltage. It`s pretty neat.

    前腕の筋肉と電圧を記録するんだ。なかなかいいですね。

  • These guys were like - like I was shocked, and I always continue to be amazed by how creative kids are, so you`ve got to listen to them.

    私はショックを受けたし、子供たちの創造性にはいつも驚かされ続けている。

  • Student named Mohammad came up with an idea that instead of just recording the EMG for a muscle, you can have two kids recording for their muscles.

    モハマッドという学生は、筋肉の筋電図をただ記録するのではなく、2人の子供がそれぞれの筋肉のために記録するというアイデアを思いつきました。

  • And do it arm-wrestling, with the winners not by who falls over, but who has the largest signal. UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Where is the biggest (inaudible).

    そして、それを行うには、腕相撲、勝者ではなく、誰が倒れることによって、しかし、誰が最大の信号を持っています。 UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: ここで最大の(inaududible)です。

  • GAGE: Yeah. This is brilliant.

    GAGE.うん。これは素晴らしいです。

  • One of the things that we say all the time is that we`re changing the world.

    私たちがいつも言っていることの一つは、世界を変えようとしているということです。

  • We feel this way very passionately that what we`re trying to do change neuroscience education.

    私たちは、私たちがやろうとしていることが神経科学の教育を変えようとしているのだと、とても情熱的に感じています。

  • AZUZ: Well, before we go, we`re going to check out a record setting performance in Seattle.

    AZUZ:その前に、シアトルでの記録的なパフォーマンスをチェックしてみましょう。

  • The city held its annual snow day over the weekend.

    同市では週末に毎年恒例の雪の日が開催された。

  • The highlight of the event - the frozen flurry you`re seeing right here.

    このイベントの目玉である凍ったようなフラッシュは、今ここで見ることができます。

  • A snowball fight, the world`s biggest one.

    雪合戦、世界最大のもの。

  • Nearly 6,000 plucky participants pelted other people with perfectly packed piles of precipitation.

    約6,000人の幸運な参加者が、完璧にパックされた降水量の山で他の人々を叩きつけました。

  • Organizers trucked in 81 tons of snow for this, that`s more than 160,000 pounds.

    主催者はこのために81トンの雪をトラックで運んだ。16万ポンド以上の雪だ。

  • That`s a big commitment, but there`s no way you can deny that everyone there had a ball.

    それは大きなコミットメントだが、そこにいた全員がボールを持っていたことを否定することはできない。

  • Community coming together for entertainment and a world record.

    地域が集まってエンターテイメントと世界記録を目指す

  • That`s the kind of story that just makes your heart melt.

    心がとろけるような話だ。

  • Hope you enjoy the rest of your Tuesday. For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I`m Carl Azuz.

    火曜日の残りの時間を楽しんでください CNN STUDENT NEWSでは カール・アズズです

  • END

    終了

UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN: From (inaudible) Lake Dallas, Texas is proud to announce that CNN STUDENT NEWS starts right now. Take it away, Carl.

UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN.テキサス州ダラス湖から CNNニュースが始まります持って行ってくれ カール

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語

2013年1月15日 - CNN学生ニュース(字幕付き

  • 233 4
    VoiceTube に公開 2020 年 08 月 06 日
動画の中の単語