Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Any way you look at it, it was going to be historic.

    どう見ても歴史的なものになりそうだった。

  • I’m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS, reporting on the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

    CNN STUDENT NEWSのカール・アズズです。2016年のアメリカ大統領選挙をレポートしています。

  • There was no incumbent this year. President Barack Obama had reached his two-term limit.

    今年は現職がいなかった。バラク・オバマ大統領は2期の任期の限界に達していました。

  • So, it was up to either Democratic presidential nominee or Republican presidential Donald Trump to succeed him.

    つまり、民主党の大統領候補か共和党のドナルド・トランプ氏の後を継ぐかは、民主党の大統領候補か共和党の大統領かのどちらかにかかっていたということですね。

  • So, first up, the winner.

    さて、まずは優勝者。

  • CNN projects that businessman and television personality Donald Trump is the president-elect of the United States.

    CNNは、実業家でタレントのドナルド・トランプ氏が米国の次期大統領になると予測している。

  • When we produced today’s show, he had clinched the presidency with at least 288 projected electoral votes.

    今日の番組を制作した時には、少なくとも288票の選挙人予想票で大統領職に就いていました。

  • Not all results were in when we went to air. But a candidate needs 270 to win the presidency.

    放送時には全ての結果が出ていませんでしたしかし、候補者が大統領に勝つには270が必要です。

  • How he did: as the votes came in last night, Mr. Trump won in several key battleground states like Florida, North Carolina and Ohio.

    彼はどのようにしたか:票が昨夜入ってきたように、トランプ氏はフロリダ、ノースカロライナ、オハイオのようないくつかの重要な争点となる州で勝利した。

  • Plus, he flipped Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, states that traditionally vote for Democratic candidates.

    ペンシルバニアとウィスコンシンは 民主党候補者に投票しています

  • And that helped him pull ahead in the Electoral College.

    そのおかげで選挙区では前に出ることができました。

  • President-elect Trump is the first candidate ever to win the office without having had government or military experience.

    トランプ次期大統領は、政府や軍事の経験がなくても当選できる史上初の候補者です。

  • Previous winners have either one or the other, or both. But he has extensive business experience.

    これまでの受賞者はどちらか一方、もしくは両方を持っています。しかし、彼は豊富なビジネス経験を持っています。

  • His work as chief executive officer helping him become chief of the executive branch. Mr. Trump

    最高執行責任者としての仕事が、彼の行政府の最高責任者になることを助けている。トランプ氏

  • overcame a 3 percent to 4 percent deficit in national polls to defeat his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

    全国世論調査で3%から4%の赤字を克服し、民主党のライバルであるヒラリー・クリントンを破った。

  • Now, it’s time for America to bind the wounds of division. Have to get together.

    今こそアメリカは分裂の傷を癒す時だ団結しなければなりません。

  • To all Republicans and Democrats, and independents across this nation,

    全国の共和党、民主党、無党派層の皆様へ

  • I say, it is time for us to come together as one united people.

    私が言うには、我々は一つの団結した民族として団結する時が来たのです。

  • It’s time!

    時間だ!

  • I pledge to every citizen of our land that I will be president of all Americans and this is so important to me.

    私はこの土地のすべての国民に、私がすべてのアメリカ人の大統領になることを誓い、これは私にとってとても重要なことです。

  • For those who have chosen not to support me in the past, of which there were a few people,

    過去に何人かの人がいた中で、私をサポートしないことを選んだ人のために。

  • I’m reaching out to you for your guidance and your help so that we can work together and unify our great country.

    私はあなたの指導とあなたの助けを求めて手を差し伸べています、私たちは一緒に働いて偉大な国を統一することができますように。

  • As I’ve said from the beginning, ours was not a campaign but rather an incredible and great movement,

    最初から言っているように、私たちのものはキャンペーンではなく、信じられないような素晴らしい運動でした。

  • made up of millions of hard-working men and women who love their country and want a better,

    何百万人もの勤勉な男性と女性が国を愛し、より良いものを求めています。

  • brighter future for themselves and for their family.

    自分と家族のために明るい未来を。

  • It’s a movement comprised of Americans from all races, religions, backgrounds, and beliefs,

    あらゆる人種、宗教、背景、信念を持つアメリカ人で構成された運動です。

  • who want and expect our government to serve the people, and serve the people it will.

    私たちの政府が国民に奉仕し、国民に奉仕することを望んでいる人、期待している人。

  • Working together, we will begin the urgent task of rebuilding our nation and renewing the American dream.

    一緒に協力して、私たちは国家を再建し、アメリカンドリームを再生するという緊急の課題を開始します。

  • In modern elections, there are usually two speeches after the vote, the kind you just heard part of and the concession speech.

    現代の選挙では、通常、投票後の演説には、今聞いたばかりの一部と譲歩演説の2つがあります。

  • No law or requirement for either one, theyre tradition. But when there’s a clear winner, the runners up typically concede.

    どちらにも法律や要件はなく、伝統です。しかし、はっきりとした勝者がいる場合は、次点者が譲歩するのが一般的です。

  • They admit they lost. They thank their supporters. They may call for national unity.

    彼らは負けを認めた支持者に感謝する国民の団結を求めるかもしれない

  • But last night, when it looked like Donald Trump was the winner, but he hadn’t officially been projected the winner yet,

    しかし昨夜は、ドナルド・トランプ氏が優勝したように見えても、まだ正式には優勝が予想されていませんでした。

  • Hillary Clinton’s campaign announced she would not speak at all overnight. At around 2:00 a.m. Eastern Time,

    ヒラリー・クリントン陣営は、一晩中一切発言しないと発表した。東部時間の午前2時頃。

  • her campaign chairman addressed the crowd at her campaign headquarters in New York City.

    彼女の選挙管理委員長はニューヨークの選挙本部で群衆に演説しました。

  • Well, folks, I know youve been here a long time and it’s been a long time and it’s been a long campaign.

    まあ、皆さん、長いこと来てくれていたのは知っていますが、長いことキャンペーンをしてくれていたのですね。

  • But I could say, we can wait a little longer, can’t we?

    でも、もう少し待ってもいいんじゃない?

  • Theyre still counting votes and every vote should count. Several states are too close to call,

    彼らはまだ票を数えているし、一票一票を数えるべきだ。いくつかの州では、あまりにも近いので、呼び出しができません。

  • so were not going to have anything more to say tonight.

    だから、今夜はもう何も言うことはありません。

  • So, listen, listen to me. Everybody should head home. You should get some sleep. Well have more to say tomorrow.

    だから、聞いてくれ、聞いてくれ。みんな家に帰るべきだ少し寝た方がいい明日また話をしよう

  • Forty minutes after that speech, though, news broke that Hillary Clinton had called Donald Trump

    しかし、その演説の40分後には、ヒラリー・クリントンがドナルド・トランプを呼んだというニュースが流れました。

  • and conceded the election. And shortly afterward, Donald Trump became the projected winner.

    と言って選挙を譲歩しました。そして直後にドナルド・トランプ氏が当選予想になりました

  • So, a couple of times today, youve heard me say the word "projected", "projected to win".

    で、今日も何度か、「予想される」「勝つために予想される」という言葉が出てきましたが、これは、「予想される」「勝つために予想される」ということです。

  • These projections are made live state by state throughout election night, and in the year 2000,

    これらの予測は、選挙の夜の間、そして2000年の間、州ごとにライブで行われます。

  • projections went back and forth over which candidate won the state of Florida, and the 25 electoral votes it had at that time.

    予測は、フロリダ州でどの候補者が勝ったのか、その時の選挙人投票数は25票だったのかを巡って行ったり来たりしていた。

  • And then there was a vote recount.

    そして、投票の再集計がありました。

  • So, projecting elections is not an exact science, but CNN has a team of people

    選挙の予測は正確な科学ではありませんがCNNにはチームがあります

  • who are devoted to projecting states quickly and projecting them accurately.

    状態を迅速に投影し、正確に投影することに専念している人たち。

  • Were going to share the numbers with you right now and some major projections.

    今の数字と大きな予想をお伝えします。

  • I’m Jennifer Agiesta, CNN’s director of polling and election analytics. Behind me, you see CNN’s decision desk.

    CNNの世論調査・選挙分析担当ディレクターのジェニファー・アギエスタです。後ろにCNNの決定デスクが見えます

  • It’s got about 14 people who will be working with us on election night.

    選挙の夜に協力してくれる人が14人ほどいる。

  • In the weeks running up to Election Day, we rehearsed election night so many times. Were divided up into teams.

    選挙日までの数週間は 選挙の夜のリハーサルを何度もしましたチームに分かれて

  • Each of the teams typically has statistician, someone who really understands the math behind the projections that were making.

    各チームには通常、統計学者がいて、私たちが行っている予測の背後にある数学を本当に理解している人がいます。

  • Each team also has a political expert, a person who knows the geography of each state.

    また、各チームには政治の専門家、つまり各州の地理に詳しい人がいます。

  • So, we used several different types of data in making our projections on election day,

    そこで、選挙当日の予測を立てる際には、いくつかの種類のデータを使い分けました。

  • our first bit of information about how people are behaving is going to be the exit polls.

    人々の行動についての最初の情報は出口調査です

  • Well be looking at what voters who voted sort of early in the morning

    早朝に投票した有権者が何を投票したのかを見ていきます。

  • and through the afternoon are saying to pollsters about why they supported the candidates that they did.

    と午後を通して世論調査員に言っているのは、なぜ彼らは彼らがした候補者を支持したのかについてです。

  • When were ready to make projection in a state, were typically looking at several different pieces.

    状態での投影ができるようになると、通常は数種類の作品を見ていることになります。

  • It’s not just an exit poll. An exit poll is one component of that.

    出口調査だけではない出口調査はその構成要素の一つです。

  • What we really need to see in a lot of the battleground states, places like Florida and New Hampshire,

    フロリダやニューハンプシャーのような多くの戦地の州で本当に見なければならないのは何か。

  • were going to be looking for a lot more than the exit poll.

    出口調査以外にも色々と探してみます

  • Our first line of defense is a group of sample precincts that match precincts where the exit polls were conducted.

    私たちの最初の防衛線は、出口の世論調査が行われた管区と一致するサンプル管区のグループです。

  • And well know pretty early in the night how voters in those precincts voted

    そして、夜のうちに、その地区の有権者がどのように投票したかがわかるでしょう。

  • and how that compares to the results of the exit poll.

    と出口調査の結果と比較してみてください。

  • CNN projects that Barack Obama will be reelected.

    CNNはバラク・オバマが再選されると予測している。

  • When were approaching 270 electoral votes, that level that would actually mean were saying

    選挙民投票数が270票に近づいているということは、そのレベルに達しているということです。

  • that a person will win the White House, that’s when things get very intense on the decision desk

    ホワイトハウスを制するとなると 意思決定の机の上では 緊張感が高まります

  • and were looking very closely at the states that are outstanding.

    と、傑出した州をよく見ています。

  • Our best line of defense when were making these projections is that were getting data from multiple sources,

    これらの予測を行う際の最高の防御ラインは、複数のソースからデータを取得していることです。

  • vote count numbers that come to us from the associated press.

    関連する報道機関から送られてくる投票数。

  • And we look at the vote count numbers that are posted on secretary of state websites and county websites

    国務長官のウェブサイトや郡のウェブサイトに掲載されている投票数を見てみましょう

  • and we try to confirm that what were seeing is correct across multiple or reporting sources

    そして、私たちが見ているものが複数のソースまたはレポートソースで正しいかどうかを確認するようにしています。

  • and look for that internal consistency in the data that were seeing.

    と、私たちが見ているデータの内部の整合性を探します。

  • The decision desk has one of the hardest jobs in journalism.

    意思決定デスクはジャーナリズムの中でも最もハードな仕事の一つです。

  • We really want to make sure that anything that we project is going to hold up in the end.

    私たちが企画したものが最後まで持ちこたえられるかどうか、本当に確認したいと思っています。

  • Were lucky in that we haven’t had an incorrect projection come out of CNN since 2000 and we hope it never happen again.

    2000年以降、CNNから不正確な予測が出てこなかったのは幸運で、二度と起こらないことを願っています。

  • Finally today, a before and after look at the balance of power in the U.S. Congress.

    最後に今日は、アメリカ議会のパワーバランスのビフォーアフターを見てみましょう。

  • Well start with the House of Representatives. Before yesterday’s election, Republicans control the House with 246 seats,

    まずは下院から。昨日の選挙前は 共和党が246議席で下院を支配しています

  • Democrats had 186 seats. All 435 voting seats were up for election because Representatives serve two-year terms.

    民主党は186議席だった。衆議院議員の任期が2年であるため、435議席すべてが選挙の対象となりました。

  • And CNN projected that Republicans would keep control of the House following yesterday’s vote.

    CNNは昨日の投票後も 共和党が下院の支配を維持すると予測しています

  • The Senate was closer. Before the election, Republicans control with 54 seats to the Democrats’ 46 seats.

    上院は接戦だった。選挙前、共和党は民主党の46議席に対して54議席で支配しています。

  • Now, that includes two independents who usually vote with the Democrats.

    その中には普段は民主党に投票している無党派層も含まれています。

  • Senators serve six-year terms and up for grabs in yesterday’s election was about a third of the Senate, 34 voting seats.

    上院議員は6年の任期を務め、昨日の選挙では上院の約3分の1、34の投票席を獲得しました。

  • You see Democrats with more seats here because more Republicans were running for reelection this year.

    民主党が議席数を増やしているのは、今年は共和党が再選に立候補していたからだ。

  • And when we produced today’s show, CNN projected that Republicans would remain in control of the Senate.

    今日の番組を制作した時CNNは共和党が上院を支配し続けると予測しました

  • And that control of Congress is significant because having a Republican majority in vote chambers

    共和党が多数を占めることで議会を支配していることは重要です。

  • could help the Republican President-elect Trump get his legislative priorities passed.

    共和党の次期大統領トランプ氏が立法の優先事項を通過させるのを助けることができるかもしれません。

  • Well, that politics our boxes for today’s coverage. Were grateful you elected to spend ten minutes with us.

    さて、今日の取材はそれで決まりですね。10分間のお時間を割いていただいて 感謝しています

  • For the office of best audience, you totally get our vote.

    最高の視聴者のオフィスのために、あなたは完全に私たちの票を取得します。

  • Well bring you the cong-rest of the legislative results as we get them.

    立法結果のコングレストを 随時お届けします

  • I’m Carl Azuz. Your candidate for pun-sident.

    カール・アズズです君のダジャレ候補だ

  • Have a great day. And stick with us for more political updates throughout the week.

    良い一日をそして、今週中に政治の最新情報をお届けします。

Any way you look at it, it was going to be historic.

どう見ても歴史的なものになりそうだった。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語

CNN学生ニュース 2016年11月9日

  • 844 27
    VoiceTube に公開 2016 年 11 月 20 日
動画の中の単語