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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Land, sea, air -- we`re heading all over to bring you stories for this Tuesday edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up, we have some election results.

  • Over the weekend, people cast their ballots in Pakistan.

  • Before this election, here is what some of the voters said about the issues that were on their minds.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (through translation): We want a government that won`t set Pakistan (inaudible).

  • That won`t rob Pakistan, but build Pakistan.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Corruption is the main cause of all those problems like unemployment, like inflation, like lack of education.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE (through translation): The country`s economy right now has reached a very dangerous level. It has reached zero.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (through translation): We`re fed up with this system, with the same words, the same people.

  • We need new people or at least they should fulfill their promises.

  • AZUZ: Looks like Pakistan`s new leader is an old leader.

  • Nawaz Sharif has been prime minister twice before,

  • and based on early results he`s about to get that title for a third time.

  • Pakistan has a parliament, kind of like the U.S. Congress, it`s made up of a Senate and a national assembly.

  • The assembly picks the country`s prime minister who serves as the head of Pakistan`s government.

  • So, whichever political party wins the most sits in the assembly,

  • that party`s leader is usually selected as prime minister.

  • And it looks like Sharif`s party won the most sits in this election.

  • All right, our next story today -- Israel.

  • Next month, it`s hosting an international conference.

  • One British scientist says he`s not going.

  • So what?

  • Well, he`s one of the most famous scientists in the world.

  • Stephen Hawking is a physicist, an astronomer, a mathematician, a cosmologist, an author, a professor.

  • Originally he said he couldn`t travel to the conference because of health reasons.

  • Then he sent a letter to the organizers that said his decision was part of a boycott against Israel.

  • Palestinian civil society groups organized this boycott in 2005.

  • It encourages world figures not to visit Israel in order to pressure that country in a negotiating with Palestinians.

  • The conflict between Israelis and Palestinians goes back decades.

  • One of the major issues is over who controls two regions -- Gaza and the West Bank.

  • A founder of the boycott praised Hawking for his decision.

  • The chairman of the conference called the decision wrong.

  • The response has been split on social media, too.

  • Some people accused Hawking of being anti-Semitic, others were offering him congratulations.

  • Certainly not the first time that someone famous has spoken out about a global issue.

  • When that happens, do you think it makes a difference?

  • That`s the question we`re asking today on our blog.

  • When public figures use their fame to promote a cause, do the y have an influence?

  • Tell us your thoughts cnnstudentnews.com.

  • Next up, we`re heading to the Horn of Africa.

  • This is a region on the continent`s east coast.

  • It`s where you`ll find the nation of Somalia.

  • The waters surrounding that country are some of the most dangerous in the world when it comes to pirate attacks.

  • Nima Elbagir rode along with some African authorities on their hunt for maritime criminals.

  • NIMA ELBAGIR, CNN CORRESPONDENT: This is the African Union`s Marine contingent.

  • Every day for the last six years they patrol the waters off the coast of Somalia on the lookout for potential threats.

  • And they don`t have to go very far to find them.

  • We`ve only got about 30 kilometers up the shore,

  • north of the capital Mogadishu and already the patrols come across a suspected pirate base.

  • We can`t get any closer than this for security reasons,

  • but this really illustrates how present that pirate threat continues to be here.

  • Since May 2012 there have been no successful pirate attacks,

  • but that doesn`t mean that there haven`t been a fair of number of attempts nor, as we just saw,

  • does it mean that there aren`t pirates waiting on shore for that window of opportunity.

  • And the African Union told us that as you go further up that coast line, there are even more pirate encampments.

  • The problem with the piracy might be felt at sea, but the root causes lie here on land.

  • And tell the international community that deals with the problems that plague Somalia as a whole.

  • Then it`s hard to see how that can be a sustainable solution,

  • a long-term solution to the issue of piracy.

  • Nima Elbagir, CNN, Mogadishu.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mr. Wondra`s social studies classes at Reedsport Community Charter School in Reedsport, Oregon.

  • What measurement of the Earth is about 7,900 miles?

  • Is it the diameter, circumference, surface area or radius.

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • The Earth diameter, a straight line from side to side that passes through the center of the planet is around 7,900 miles long.

  • That`s your answer and that`s you "Shoutout."

  • AZUZ: Satellites can`t go through the middle of the planet, nor does it get from one side of the Earth to the other, that have got to take the long way around.

  • And while they`re orbiting up there, some of them are looking down here, capturing images of how the world is changing and how people are changing it.

  • Sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse.

  • REBECCA MOORE, ENGINEERING MANAGER, GOOGLE EARTH OUTREACH AND EARTH ENGINE: What we felt is the world`s first multidecade animated time lapse of the Earth.

  • Working with our partners, U.S. Geological Survey and NASA, we`ve brought online millions of satellites images starting from 1984 to 2012.

  • It`s trillions of pixels of satellite imagery data that have never been available to the public before

  • and we`ve stitched that together into this seamless animation of the planet changing over time.

  • When you see the disappearing Amazon rainforest, it`s pretty shocking.

  • It`s pretty shocking.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: One area of rainforest in particular that used to be about the size of Kansas, has now lost a third of its acreage in just the last 30 years.

  • That`s a lot of trees going down very fast.

  • We see glaciers retreating across the surface of the world due to the impacts of climate change and other factors.

  • MOORE: You can see innovative, actually, water projects happening in the middle of the desert in the Middle East where they`ve created verdant agricultural fields out of nothing.

  • You can see artificial cities being built off -- out into the ocean.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: When you look at Las Vegas, the sprawl that came as a result partly of the housing boom, has been remarkable,

  • except that Lake Mead, which keeps the whole area hydrated, has been shrinking in direct proportion to the growth of the city.

  • MOORE: NASA just launched the next Landsat satellite, Landsat 8.

  • And yet, Congress is now considering whether to continue the Landsat Earth observing mission past Landsat 8.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That would be a terrible mistake.

  • If we can`t see how we are changing and sometimes damaging our Earth, we certainly can`t keep ourselves accountable for it.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A tree? Oh my god!

  • AZUZ: It seems like it`d be cook to watch until you realize, it`s not stopping,

  • what`s being called an ice tsunami creepily crackling and crawling its way to a Minnesota neighborhood.

  • Mille Lacs Lake, which is popular for ice fishing in the winter, just made news for ice creeping in the spring.

  • Meteorologists say wind is the culprit here.

  • What`s left of the frozen sheet that covers the lake in colder month, was apparently blown ashore by winds as high as 40 miles per hour.

  • Fortunately, the ice itself was moving much more slowly.

  • You could get out of its way in plenty of time.

  • But the homes couldn`t, and the force of it damaged doors and broke windows,

  • giving some lakefront residents their first really bad view of the lake.

  • When the wave of ice stopped, and it piled 30 feet in some places,

  • construction crews were brought in to get it away from homes to protect them from flooding.

  • Must have been what Roberts Frost meant when we wrote that for destruction,

  • ice is also great and would suffice.

  • And finally today, Chris Hadfield might be the most interesting man out of this world.

  • Since December, the Canadian astronaut has been making science experiment videos on the International Space Station.

  • He`s become a bit of an online star.

  • Before he heads back to Earth next week, Hadfield put together what could be the first music video made in space.

  • CHRIS HADFIELD (singing)

  • AZUZ: Covering David Bowie`s "Space Oddity" while you`re in space.

  • At least he`s in tune with his surroundings.

  • His return ride on the Soyuz could be inspiration for a perfect follow-up from the rocket man,

  • or it might be better if he waits a while before his next single, because after all, Hadfield`s music should be spaced out.

  • It`s time for us to blast off, we`ll launch into more news tomorrow.

  • See you then.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Land, sea, air -- we`re heading all over to bring you stories for this Tuesday edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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2013年5月14日 - CNN学生ニュース(字幕付き (May 14, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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