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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: I`m Carl Azuz. This is CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Thank you for spending part of your day with us.

  • We`re going to start today`s program in a country we haven`t really reported on for a while -- Iraq.

  • The U.S. military mission in that Middle Eastern nation ended more than a year ago, but the violence -- not over.

  • Last month more than 700 Iraqis, mostly civilians died from violence.

  • That`s more than any other month since June of 2008.

  • Yesterday at least seven people were killed and 16 others wounded by multiple bombings in Baghdad and Mosul.

  • The body of alleged Boston bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev is at a funeral home in Massachusetts.

  • But the funeral director says, he can`t find a cemetery willing to bury Tsarnaev.

  • PETER STEFAN, FUNERAL DIRECTOR: I think a lot of people don`t understand, and it`s an emotional problem, obviously,

  • but it settles down and people think about it, they do know that we have to bury (inaudible), that`s what`s this country does.

  • At this point, any outcome would be better than nothing.

  • We do have to bury the person regards what he did as I said earlier,

  • this country would bury the dead, funeral directors had done this for years, they continued to do it.

  • And there aren`t too many options, when there`s no problem, it`s very easy with the cemetery,

  • but this is a big problem, but somebody has to step in and say, look, we`re going to have to do something here. And we have to.

  • I would go as far as I can go with it.

  • AZUZ: There are some concerns about possible protests like this, at the cemetery where the body would be buried.

  • And this kind of thing has come in the past.

  • Lee Harvey Oswald is buried in the Dallas area, the same city were he assassinated President John Kennedy.

  • And after Oklahoma city bomber Timothy McVeigh was executed,

  • his ashes were claimed and scattered in an unknown place.

  • The governor of Massachusetts says Tsarnaev`s family should be the ones to decide what happens to his body.

  • Technology can play a big role in tracking criminal or terrorism suspects.

  • Tom Foreman looks at how this works and how it`s improving.

  • TOM FOREMAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: When the FBI released these photos during the search for the Boston suspects,

  • there was hope that computers might help as they do on shows like CSI,

  • comparing facial features with existing data and coming up with a name.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hello, Harry.

  • FOREMAN: But even though pictures of both brothers were in public databases,

  • the computers that searched that data missed them, and came up empty.

  • The government has been working on facial identification software since the 1960s,

  • and companies like Facebook and Apple use similar technology to tag people in photos.

  • But security analysts widely admit this technology is not good enough to spot a suspect in the crowd.

  • At Carnegie Melon, Mario Savvides runs the CyLab Biometric Center.

  • MARIOS SAVVIDES, DIRECTOR, CMU CYLAB BIOMETRICS CENTER: While the toughest problems is low resolution,

  • when you look at images collected from (inaudible) TV footage, the faces are way too small.

  • FOREMAN: His team is developing next generation software to change poor and partial images into much clearer pictures.

  • They are creating programs that can reliably match images of people to their true identities, despite low light, movement, odd positions.

  • SAVVIDES: Off-angle is a big challenge.

  • How do you match an off- angle image that`s say 50 degrees, 60 degrees, 45 degrees off angle

  • to a face that`s just a frontal sort of, you know, passport-type photo.

  • FOREMAN: They`re even transforming flat pictures into 3D, look at what their lab did with a single photo of me.

  • In less than an hour it was turned into a series of images showing how I might look from above, from the left, from the right.

  • Savvides believes such programs can and will substantially improve the reliability of facial recognition and lead police to suspects much faster.

  • SAVVIDES: And ultimately, hopefully save life, because that`s our aim, that`s our goal, that`s everything we do here.

  • FOREMAN: For now, the FBI is installing its latest version of facial identification software to work with security cameras coast to coast as part of the billion-dollar program called "next generation identification."

  • Still, in Boston, it wasn`t technology, but human investigators who triumphed.

  • Tom Foreman, CNN, Washington.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Is this legit? The U.S. Constitution requires states to have a sales tax.

  • No, not true. The Constitution talks about taxes, but it doesn`t require a sales tax. Some states don`t have one at all.

  • AZUZ: One benefit to online shopping besides perusing public places in pajamas is that sometimes you`re not charges sales tax,

  • but through a bill called the Market Place Fairness Act, the government is thinking about changing that.

  • It`s not certain the bill will pass, but if it does, some states could require all Internet retailers to collect sales taxes.

  • Currently, businesses that have a store in your state, already do.

  • So, shop at Target or Macy`s.com and you`ll probably pay tax.

  • It`s when people order from Ebay or Amazon, for instance, that they are not always charged sales tax.

  • Some lawmakers, both Republicans and Democrats, support the bill.

  • So does the president. And states with sales taxes would benefit because they`d be getting the money.

  • Supporters say the goal besides increasing tax revenue is to level the playing field.

  • They think online only sellers, which may not collect taxes have an unfair advantage over the store down the street from you, which does.

  • But most shoppers don`t like the idea.

  • In a recent poll by Quinnipiac University, 56 percent oppose the bill, 37 percent support it.

  • Many of those who aren`t charged Texas now on stuff they buy, don`t want to be.

  • And opponents of the bill say it will hurt many small online businesses because their prices will appear higher with taxes adding (ph).

  • One thing that no one seems to dispute, it`s a taxing debate.

  • Ha-ha, get it? All right, now the Fortune 500, it`s an annual list of the 500 biggest U.S. companies.

  • This year`s list is out, so let`s see who`s on it.

  • These are the top ten: Wal-Mart is number one, followed by three oil companies.

  • You see Apple there and a few car companies.

  • Some interest info about the Fortune 500:

  • since 1955, the number one company every year has been either Wal-Mart, Exxon or General Motors.

  • They`re all on the top ten this year.

  • If you put all of the Fortune 500 together, and consider it a country, it would have the world`s second largest economy behind the U.S.

  • How about the people who run these companies?

  • All the CEO on this year`s list, David Murdock from Dole Foods, he`s 90.

  • The youngest, Facebook`s Mark Zuckerberg, at 28 years old.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Ms. Shaughnessy`s social studies classes at Baltimore Talent Development High School in Baltimore, Maryland.

  • What do a person`s lacrimal glands produce?

  • You know what to do. So, is it adrenaline, tears, sweat or plasma? You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • Your lacrimal glands produce tears.

  • But what happens if you cry in space?

  • Well, the answer to that comes from an astronaut on an International Space Station.

  • CHRIS HADFIELD, ASTRONAUT: I can`t cry on command, but I`m going to take some water, drinking water,

  • put it in my eye just as if it was crying. Let`s see what happens.

  • So nice and stable for you here.

  • Here we go.

  • So, just as if I started crying, my eyes are full of tears.

  • But you can see, it just forms a ball on my eye.

  • In fact, I can put more water in.

  • And so, if you keep crying, you just sort of put a bigger and bigger ball of water in your eye.

  • Until eventually it crosses across your nose and gets into your other eye or evaporates or maybe spreads over your cheek.

  • Or you grab a towel to dry it up.

  • So yes, I`ve gotten things on my eye,

  • your eyes will definitely cry in space,

  • but the big difference is, tears don`t fall.

  • AZUZ: Well no tears on National Teacher Day, it`s today.

  • We`re giving you the chance to tell us about your favorite teachers all this week.

  • Some of you were doing that with I-Reports.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: This is Miriam (ph).

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And this is Ka (ph).

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And we`d like to honor our science teacher Mr. (inaudible) for student appreciation week.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He`s fun and energetic and always hacking jokes around the classroom.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We will (inaudible) you, Mr. Amon is most likely to help us see the road with new eyes.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Thank you, CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • AZUZ: Others are writing on our Facebook page, like Rachel who gave a shoutout to Mrs. Cherry for breaking down history, and helping her students to keep up with the news.

  • Or Eaton, who said he appreciates Mr. Cline because he knows how to mix education and humor.

  • Keep those comments on I-Report`s coming.

  • Teachers, we appreciate you and your feedback.

  • If you head to the resources box on our homepage, you can share your thoughts on today`s show.

  • For this last story today, we`re definitely calling shot bun.

  • Not everyday, that a hot dog shaped car pools in near drive way, but this wiener mobile is here for one special woman, Pearl Cantrell.

  • 105 years old, she recently shared her secret -- bacon. She said she eats it for every meal.

  • The Oscar Mayer company heard that and headed right over,

  • drove her around town in the Wiener mobile and hooked her up with a bountiful bundle of bacon to boot.

  • Looks like Ms. Cantrell is set to pig out.

  • You guys can choose (ph) one over for a while, we`ll be backing up more for tomorrow show. See you then.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: I`m Carl Azuz. This is CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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2013年5月7日 - CNN学生ニュース(字幕付き (May 7, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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