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  • Hope your Tuesday is going well

  • and were glad youre spending 10 minutes of it with CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • I’m Carl Azuz.

  • There’s a legal case playing out between the U.S. government and the technology company

  • and it’s lit up a nationwide debate about national security versus information privacy.

  • Syed Farook was one of the two of the terrorists who carried out an attack in California

  • that killed 14 people in December.

  • The federal bureau of investigation recovered his iPhone

  • and a U.S. court has ordered the Apple company to help agents hack it,

  • to get more information about the terrorists and his plans.

  • But Apple has refused, saying civil liberties are at stake

  • and that helping the government would make its products more vulnerable to cyber crime.

  • The company has until Friday to formally respond to the ruling in court.

  • CNN’s Laurie Segall is exploring both sides of this controversy.

  • The FBI vs. Apple.

  • So, a California court ruled that Apple needs to help the FBI break into the phone of

  • one of the San Bernardino shooters.

  • Now, as Tim Cook puts it, essentially, hack our own usersiPhone.

  • OK. Well, here’s how the FBI puts it. Theyre asking for access to the phone of a known terrorist,

  • to give valuable information.

  • Yes, but here’s the thing.

  • It’s not like Apple knows his password

  • and iPhones erase after the wrong password is entered 10 times.

  • What the court wants Apple to do is to actually create new software

  • that would allow the FBI to guess the password in unlimited number of times.

  • Look, investigators in a terror attack already made the case

  • that they need access to the phone and it was granted.

  • Apple is just not letting them in.

  • The government essentially wants Apple to create a backdoor.

  • OK, wait a sec, the FBI is not calling it a backdoor.

  • Theyre saying one time access to the phone of a known terrorist.

  • The court ruling wasn’t for Apple to break into every iPhone, just this one iPhone.

  • Well, let me explain the tech side.

  • Apple says once youve made the new software, it’s essentially Pandora’s Box.

  • It exists. It can be used to help the good guys.

  • But here’s the scary part, it could also be used to help the bad guys break into any iPhone.

  • But Apple has helped law enforcements dozens of times in the past.

  • Yes, but that was an older operating system.

  • Apple was simply able to extract the data.

  • But the newest software is actually more secure.

  • Without cracking the password, they can’t access anything.

  • That’s not true. Technically, it’s possible. Apple could build custom firmware for that.

  • Right. But think about the question that that raises.

  • Does this ruling give the government the ability to force Apple engineers to actually write new code?

  • That sets a major, major precedent.

  • Look, investigators have already gotten key location data from this phone using cell tower.

  • And the shooters had ties to ISIS, contacts, messages,

  • all of that information is locked away in this thing.

  • That’s because it’s encrypted, which is important for customers safety.

  • The suspect is dead, so that gets around the privacy provisions.

  • He didn’t buy the phone. It was actually his work phone supplied to him by the local government.

  • There’s a lot at stake and a lot of sympathy for these victims.

  • For Apple and the FBI, this case is a battle in the making for years.

  • The outcome will set major precedent.

  • Hunger is a problem that exists in every country of the world.

  • And yet, it’s estimated that one third of all of the food produced for people to eat

  • is lost or wasted, thirty-three percent.

  • Food loss usually happens early in the chain.

  • It’s when food gets spoiled, spills or wilts before it gets to consumers.

  • Food waste happens later, when something safe to eat but it gets thrown out anyway.

  • Consumers take a lot of the blame here, especially in wealthier countries,

  • people buy more than they eat and then just toss it out.

  • The restaurants and grocery stores also worsen the problem.

  • They may throw away food that people didn’t purchase by the sell-by date

  • or they may be concerned about being sued if they do give food away and someone who eats it get sick.

  • The U.S. has a law in the books passed in 1996

  • that aims to encourage companies to donate food and groceries to charities

  • and it protects the donors from law suits if someone does get sick.

  • Some new legislation in France aims to do the same thing.

  • The question is, will it catch on and limit food waste?

  • This is probably not what you envision when you think of dining out in France:

  • the free food line at a homeless shelter in Paris.

  • Yet, food charities estimate that more than 2.5 million in France

  • depend on food handouts in one form or another.

  • At the same time, restaurants, food stores and French families

  • dumped tons of still edible food products into the trash each year,

  • something that has produced what some say now is a sad and far too common sight,

  • scavengers going through other people’s discards looking for something to eat.

  • Some markets and stores had tried to discourage the scavenger.

  • But now, in part, that is about to change.

  • A new law here requires larger supermarkets to strike deals with local food banks

  • to donate unsold food to help feed those in need.

  • It’s estimated that the French waste 7 million tons of food products each year,

  • 700,000 tons of that is from supermarkets,

  • which typically throw out food products when they reach their best-before date.

  • But best-before does not mean spoiled. That food is still safe to eat.

  • One large supermarket chain which has fought against food waste for years

  • applauds the new law, especially since it will clear up legal liability issues

  • that could arise from donating unsold food.

  • In fact, when you are for example 20 days to sell a product

  • and if you did not sell the product after 15 days, what you can do,

  • you can cut the price and make an offer for your costumers before two days before expiring date,

  • you just have to donate it. It’s safe. It’s the same product.

  • But we are not allowed to sell the product after expiring date or after best-before date.

  • Food banks are expecting a 15 percent increase in donations because of the new law

  • Others here would like to see the French law duplicated across the European Union,

  • but he says that the biggest food wasters are still individuals and families

  • which account for nearly 70 percent of damaged or out of date but still edible food that is thrown away.

  • Sean Dever is a student on a lacrosse scholarship in North Georgia.

  • He said that one of the best days of his life is when he signed on to play with the private college there.

  • He’s got some other highlights,

  • ones that helped him overcome much more than the challenges of the game.

  • It’s why he’s today’s CNN STUDENT NEWS "Character Study".

  • Sports have always been a huge part of Sean Dever’s life.

  • I started playing soccer before kindergarten

  • and started playing lacrosse in fourth grade, basketball in third grade.

  • In 2007, when he was 11 years old, a fall at lacrosse camp changed his life.

  • My mom was very concerned that I was not walking along the way.

  • So, she took me to the doctor and they suggested an MRI.

  • The tests revealed that Sean had a type of bone cancer known as osteosarcoma.

  • That means the tumor was located in his lower femur,

  • the distal part of his thigh bone right there.

  • I had to grow up very fast.

  • After three months of chemotherapy, surgeons removed the cancerous part of his leg,

  • including the knee, an approach that gave him the best chance of getting back in the game.

  • That summer was just me learning to walk again.

  • All the physical therapy, all the pain and everything I went through was to get back on a lacrosse field.

  • And he did.

  • Every day was a gift, and he played like it and he was one of the best players I’ve ever had.

  • Today, Sean is captain of the lacrosse team at Young Harris College.

  • He’s been cancer-free for eight years

  • and volunteers with the Childhood Cancer Charity to show others what is possible.

  • It’s worth pushing through things, the pain that you go through

  • is temporary and the happiness will last a lot longer.

  • Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN, reporting.

  • For the first time in our "Roll Call", Greece is the word y’all.

  • We are paying a visit to the nation’s capital of Athens,

  • where were happy to see the American Community Schools of Athens.

  • Thank you for watching. Next, there’s always hope in North Dakota.

  • The city of Hope is the home of Hope High School and the Spartans.

  • And in northwestern Louisiana, we come to the town of Haughton.

  • Hello to the Buccaneers of Haughton Middle School.

  • So, it’s cold outside. Weve got cabin fever, some softball equipment and snowmobiles.

  • Hey, I know. Snowmobile softball.

  • Take a swing, fire up your vehicle and ride to first base.

  • Is it safe? Probably less safe than softball.

  • Is there strategy? One rider says no.

  • But it is a way for folks near Greenville, Wisconsin, to get outside and the proceeds --

  • yes, this event raises money --

  • they go toward equipment and maintaining snowmobile trails.

  • Got to be the last place where you’d want to drop your mobile.

  • Are there slides? There are skids.

  • Are there baselines? There are tracks.

  • Catchers probably run away from place to plate,

  • but the field is always machine-groomed. I’m Carl Azuz and were out.

Hope your Tuesday is going well

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2016年2月23日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (February 23, 2016 - CNN Student News with subtitle)

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