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  • Hi, I'm Carl Azuz, delivering your Tuesday,

  • November 24 edition of CNN Student News.

  • Our first story concerns last year's outbreak

  • of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa.

  • It was the largest epidemic in history.

  • The worst hit countries were Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone,

  • though it spread across the world after some people

  • who'd traveled to the region returned home with the virus.

  • Since last year, Ebola has killed more than 11, 300 people,

  • and it's not completely contained.

  • Liberian health officials just confirmed three new cases.

  • A new report by international health experts

  • suggests the outbreak wouldn't have been as bad

  • if the World Health Organization had sounded the alarm sooner.

  • The group is part of the United Nations.

  • It aims to monitor and protect people's health worldwide.

  • It was accused of waiting until last August

  • to declare the outbreak a public health emergency

  • when it allegedly knew Ebola was out of control in the spring.

  • The director of the Harvard Global Health Institute,

  • which contributed to the report,

  • says the cost of the UN organization's delay was enormous.

  • The World Health Organization responded by saying

  • it welcomed the report, that some of the report's recommendations

  • were already being put in place,

  • and that the tide has been turned against the outbreak.

  • French investigators are piecing together clues of

  • what led up to the November 13th terrorist attacks in Paris.

  • They haven't yet identified all seven of the ISIS terrorists who were killed,

  • but officials believe that three of them entered France as refugees.

  • As many as 10, 000 police officers and 6500 soldiers

  • have been deployed across the French capital.

  • Brussels, Belgium remains under that nation's highest terror threat level.

  • At least one suspect there as been charged in connection with the Paris attacks.

  • Others are being detained for further questioning.

  • Meantime, international airstrikes against ISIS targets

  • in Iraq and Syria continue.

  • Are they having an impact?

  • It has been more than a year since the coalition airstrikes

  • began in Iraq and Syria. So now, where do we stand in the fight against ISIS?

  • The first airstrikes against ISIS began August 8th, 2014.

  • The US Defense Department says since then more than 8, 000 airstrikes

  • have hit Iraq and Syria.

  • Almost two thirds of those have been launched by the United States

  • at a cost of nearly $ 5 billion.

  • Targets include oil refineries, pipelines, buildings,

  • armored vehicles, tanks, and fighting positions.

  • The targets are strategic, designed to weaken ISIS both

  • militarily and financially, by destroying the oil infrastructure

  • that enables ISIS to sell oil on the black market.

  • There are now 65 coalition partners,

  • but not all of them are engaged in combat.

  • Only nine, including the United States,

  • are actually involved in airstrikes against ISIS.

  • At the start of the bombing campaign,

  • the CIA said there were as many as 30, 000 ISIS fighters.

  • The CIA has yet to update those numbers.

  • ISIS considers itself a state and is setting up governments

  • in captured cities like Raqqa in Syria and Ramadi and Mosul in Iraq.

  • ISIS has also made significant gains in Libya and Egypt.

  • And then there's the question of loyalties.

  • In Syria, there's president Bashar al- Assad on one side and ISIS on the other,

  • with a number of rebel fashions in between,

  • whose loyalties can be very difficult to figure out.

  • The US has spent hundreds of millions of dollars

  • training moderate Syrian rebels, with little to no success.

  • Drone strikes have killed several high- value ISIS leaders in the region,

  • including HafúSaeed, the ISIS leader in Afghanistan and Pakistan,

  • and Mohammed Emwazi, also known as Jihadi John,

  • who was killed in November.

  • But now ISIS is entering a dangerous new phase

  • in response to coalition advances,

  • launching external operations in which European nationals train

  • and fight alongside ISIS fighters to carry out attacks like the one in Paris.

  • And now they're threatening more.

  • ISIS has also claimed responsibility for taking down

  • a Russian passenger plane in Egypt in October,

  • an attack it says was in retaliation for Russian air strikes in Syria.

  • Those airstrikes are not being launched in coordination

  • with the United States, because the two nations disagree

  • on whether Bashar al- Assad should stay in power.

  • Yet another sign of just how complicated this fight is amidst the chaos.

  • Well, it's time to take roll.

  • Let's see who's watching and requesting a mention

  • on our transcript page at CNNStudentNews. com.

  • In southeast Minnesota you'll find the city of Eagan.

  • You'll also find the Wildcats on the prowl at Dakota Hills Middle School.

  • Moving southwest to Grand Island, Nebraska.

  • The Islanders are there. Hello to Grand Island Senior High School.

  • And in the northern German city of Hamburg,

  • it's great to have the International School of Hamburg

  • watching CNN Student News.

  • I think it's just surprising that the first one,

  • the first accumulating snowfall we've had, has been so bad.

  • Usually, you know, the first one doesn't even stick.

  • But this one did. The first significant snowfall of the season

  • has hit the northern US. And while seeing snow in the north

  • is like seeing sand at the beach, what's different this time around

  • is that some spots saw several inches relatively early in the season.

  • These are scenes from Southern Wisconsin.

  • A different kind of weather event just brought snow to folks in Northwestern Michigan,

  • Northeastern Ohio, and Northwestern New York.

  • One thing they all have in common, besides northern latitudes,

  • they're near one of the Great Lakes, so they're no stranger to lake- effect snow.

  • Let's talk about lake- effect snow.

  • As a boy growing up in Buffalo, New York, I knew it as a day off school.

  • My dad knew it as a day he may not get home from work

  • cuz it was just snowing too hard.

  • But how does it work? Well, first of all, you need a lake,

  • cuz it's called lake- effect snow. And the lake needs to be unfrozen,

  • 35, 40, 45 degrees is great.

  • And then the air that blows across it from the north or from the west

  • can be 10 degrees. All of a sudden, the moisture from the lake

  • mixes in with the cold air from the north, and you get big clouds,

  • and you can get big snow. When it goes on land and goes uphill,

  • all of the sudden you get significant lake- effect snow.

  • It could be two to three inches per hour.

  • And depending on where you are,

  • if you're just south of it or north of this lake- effect band,

  • it can look like a wall of snow is coming down.

  • And so that's why you can be anywhere from

  • a two to three inch snowfall in one county,

  • and just a few miles south you can get 30 inches in one day.

  • Well, this will be our last show of the week.

  • We'll be off until next Monday for the Thanksgiving holiday.

  • It's an American event that's believed to commemorate

  • a harvest feast in 1621 between Wampanoag Indians

  • and the newly arrived pilgrims from England.

  • Today, many family and friends get together, give thanks,

  • enjoy a day off work, and gobble up some turkey.

  • Every year at Thanksgiving, the President pardons one special turkey

  • that gets to live out the rest of its life in peace. This ain't it.

  • It's a crucial part of tradition, one that says Thanksgiving isn't Thanksgiving without turkey.

  • And maybe a nap. Tryptophan, an essential amino acid in turkey,

  • functions as a precursor to serotonin, a substance that helps regulate sleep.

  • And if your feasting leads to sleeping, you might dream of smoked turkey,

  • stuffed turkey, roasted turkey, fried turkey, turkey sandwiches,

  • turkey dogs, turkey legs, turkey bacon, turkey jerky.

  • It doesn't matter as long as it's on the table and you're not a vegetarian.

  • But get this. There's actually no proof that turkeys

  • were part of the first Thanksgiving harvest feast back in 1621.

  • What was on the table? Probably venison or goose,

  • they were more readily available.

  • But that wouldn't have mattered much to folks like Ben Franklin.

  • The founding father was a huge fan of turkeys.

  • He once went so far as to call the bald eagle, our national symbol,

  • a bird of bad moral character, adding that the turkey was more respectable.

  • We couldn't reach any eagles for comment,

  • and the turkeys we had were cooked,

  • but there's no denying a connection between turkeys and freedom.

  • Take, for example, this brash bird brain,

  • who exercised his freedom to stop traffic without giving up his freedom to run away.

  • These audacious adventurers were seeking freedom on the railways,

  • hoping to catch the first train out of Jersey before Thanksgiving.

  • And this costumed creature is free to roam about the house

  • as a pet without having to worry about the oven.

  • He's just like a little dog with wings.

  • Not to mention strong strong bird- like features.

  • But besides the oven, what is a turkey's biggest fear?

  • Behold the turkey eating competition,

  • where gorgers guiltlessly gobble all the turkey they can.

  • It's definitely not for the birds. They'll all tell you its a foul idea.

  • Before we go, as if singing in front of a crowd isn't hard enough.

  • That's not the only time during the Australian National Anthem that happened,

  • but seven year old Ethan Hall said he had a job to do

  • and he battled through it. Some of the players couldn't help but chuckle.

  • Ethan never gave up, he went until the song was finished,

  • saying if he hadn't, the game wouldn't have gone on.

  • So, maybe you can't say it went off without a hiccup,

  • you can say he took a breather, though it was an interrupted one.

  • Still, given the glottis of good publicity that followed

  • Ethan's persevering performance, hi'cup runneth over.

  • CNN Student News is thankful to have you in our audience,

  • we hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving,

  • and we'll see you again next Monday, November 30th.

Hi, I'm Carl Azuz, delivering your Tuesday,

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2015年11月24日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (November 24, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle)

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