Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • Think back to a really vivid memory.

    すごく鮮明な記憶を思い出してみてください。

  • Got it?

    思い出しましたか?

  • Okay, now try to remember what you had for lunch three weeks ago.

    では、3週間前に何を食べたか、思い出してみてください。

  • That second memory probably isn't as strong,

    後者の記憶は、おそらく前者ほど強いものではないでしょう。

  • but why not?

    でもどうして?

  • Why do we remember some things, and not others?

    なぜ私たちはあることを覚えて、あることは忘れるのか?

  • And why do memories eventually fade?

    どうして記憶は、最終的に薄れるのか?

  • Let's look at how memories form in the first place.

    そもそも、記憶がどのように形成されるのか見てみましょう。

  • When you experience something, like dialing a phone number,

    電話番号をダイヤルするなど、何かを経験すると、

  • the experience is converted into a pulse of electrical energy

    その経験は電気エネルギーのパルスに変換され

  • that zips along a network of neurons.

    神経細胞のネットワークを勢いよく伝っていきます。

  • Information first lands in short-term memory,

    情報はまず、短期記憶となります。

  • where it's available from anywhere from a few seconds to a couple of minutes.

    これは数秒から数分の記憶です。

  • It's then transferred to long-term memory through areas such as the hippocampus,

    それから海馬などの領域を通って、長期記憶へと移ります。

  • and finally to several storage regions across the brain.

    そして最終的に、脳内の記憶領域へと至ります。

  • Neurons throughout the brain communicate at dedicated sites called synapses, using specialized neurotransmitters.

    脳内の神経細胞は、特別な神経伝達物質を使い、シナプスと呼ばれる特定の場所で通信しあいます。

  • If two neurons communicate repeatedly, a remarkable thing happens:

    2つの神経細胞が繰り返し通信しあうと、驚くべきことが起こります。

  • the efficiency of communication between them increases.

    その神経細胞間の通信効率が向上するのです。

  • This process, called long term potentiation,

    このプロセスは長期増強と呼ばれ

  • is considered to be a mechanism by which memories are stored long-term,

    記憶が長期的なものとなるメカニズムと考えられています。

  • but how do some memories get lost?

    でも記憶はどのように失われるのでしょうか?

  • Age is one factor.

    年齢は一つの要素です。

  • As we get older, synapses begin to falter and weaken,

    年をとるにつれ、シナプスは低迷し、弱くなり始めます。

  • affecting how easily we can retrieve memories.

    そして、記憶の呼び起こしやすさに影響します。

  • Scientists have several theories about what's behind this deterioration,

    このシナプスの機能低下の背景について、科学者は複数の学説を提言しています。

  • from actual brain shrinkage, the hippocampus loses 5% of its neurons every decade

    脳が実際に収縮することや海馬が10年毎に5%のニューロンを失って

  • for a total loss of 20% by the time you're 80 years old

    80歳になるまでには、合計20%のニューロンが失われていること、

  • to the drop in the production of neurotransmitters,

    神経伝達物質の生産量の低下なども挙げられます。

  • like acetylcholine, which is vital to learning and memory.

    それには学習や記憶に不可欠な、アセチルコリンが含まれます。

  • These changes seem to affect how people retrieve stored information.

    こういった変化により、人がどうやって記憶を呼び起こすかに影響が及んでいるようです。

  • Age also affects our memory-making abilities.

    年齢はまた、記憶を作る能力にも影響します。

  • Memories are encoded most strongly when we're paying attention,

    記憶は、私たちが注意を払っている時に最も強力に刻まれます。

  • when we're deeply engaged, and when information is meaningful to us.

    私たちが深く関わっている時や、その情報が意味を持つ時です。

  • Mental and physical health problems, which tend to increase as we age,

    精神面、身体面の健康に関わる問題は、年を重ねるごとに増える傾向にありますが

  • interfere with our ability to pay attention,

    これは私たちの注意力にも介入します。

  • and thus act as memory thieves.

    そして、記憶を奪う要素となってしまうのです。

  • Another leading cause of memory problems is chronic stress.

    記憶に関する問題の主要な要因として、慢性的ストレスも挙げられます。

  • When we're constantly overloaded with work and personal responsibilites,

    仕事や個人的な責任で、常時過度な負担がかかっていると

  • our bodies are on hyper-alert.

    私たちの体は高度警戒状態にあります。

  • This response has evolved from the physiological mechanism

    この反応は、生理学的メカニズムから進化したもので

  • designed to make sure we can survive in a crisis.

    危機を確実に生き延びるためのものです。

  • Stress chemicals help mobilize energy and increase alertness.

    ストレスに関連する化学物質は、エネルギーを収集し警戒度を高めます。

  • However, with chronic stress our bodies become flooded with these chemicals,

    しかし慢性的ストレスにより、私たちの体はこれらの化学物質であふれていて

  • resulting in a loss of brain cells and an inability to form new ones,

    脳細胞の損失や、新しい脳細胞を作る能力の欠如をもたらしています。

  • which affects our ability to retain new information.

    これにより、新しい情報を保持する能力にも影響があります。

  • Depression is another culprit.

    鬱ももう1つの要因です。

  • People who are depressed are 40% more likely to develop memory problems.

    鬱状態にある人は、記憶に関する問題が生じる可能性が40%高まります。

  • Low levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter connected to arousal,

    喚起に関連する神経伝達物質である、セロトニンのレベルが低いことにより

  • may make depressed individuals less attentive to new information.

    新しい情報に向ける注意力が下がる可能性があります。

  • Dwelling on sad events in the past, another symptom of depression.

    鬱の症状の一つに、過去の悲しい出来事を引きずることがありますが

  • Makes it difficult to pay attention to the present,

    それにより現在に注意を向けることが難しくなり

  • affecting the ability to store short-term memories.

    短期記憶能力に影響します。

  • Isolation, which is tied to depression, is another memory thief.

    鬱に関連した要素に孤独がありますが、それも記憶を奪う要素の一つです。

  • A study by the Harvard School of Public Health

    ハーバード公衆衛生大学院の研究によると

  • found that older people with high levels of social integration had a slower rate of memory decline over a six-year period.

    社会的統合度の高い年配の人ほど、6年の期間における記憶力の低下スピードが遅くなりました。

  • The exact reason remains unclear,

    明確な理由は定かではありませんが

  • but experts suspect that

    専門家は

  • social interaction gives our brain a mental workout.

    社会交流によって、脳は精神的なトレーニングを行うことができると考えています。

  • Just like muscle strength,

    筋肉の強さと同じように

  • we have to use our brain or risk losing it.

    脳を使わないと、機能を失う可能性があるのです。

  • But don't despair.

    でも諦めないで。

  • There are several steps you can take

    いくつかのステップを踏めば

  • to aid your brain in preserving your memories.

    記憶力を保持するサポートができます。

  • Make sure you keep physically active.

    体を動かすこと。

  • Increased blood flow to the brain is helpful.

    血流が増えると、脳の役に立ちます。

  • And eat well.

    よく食べること。

  • Your brain needs all the right nutrients to keep functioning correctly.

    脳が正しく機能するには、正しい栄養素が全て必要です。

  • And finally, give your brain a workout.

    最後に、脳のトレーニングをすること。

  • Exposing your brain to challenges, like learning a new language, is one of the best defenses for keeping your memories intact.

    新しい言語を学ぶなど、脳を使って課題に挑戦することは記憶力を保つうえで最善の方法の一つです。

Think back to a really vivid memory.

すごく鮮明な記憶を思い出してみてください。

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED-Ed 記憶 神経 細胞 シナプス 物質

【TED-Ed】記憶の形成と失う過程 (【TED-Ed】How memories form and how we lose them - Catharine Young)

  • 109681 8056
    SylviaQQ に公開 2019 年 06 月 11 日
動画の中の単語