Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Dear Mayor Bloomberg:

  • I am so nervous because a test

  • is in three weeks.

  • When my teacher, Miss

  • Rubenstein, told my class how

  • important this test was,

  • I started to sweat.

  • I feel like a marshmallow

  • on a stick, getting put

  • in a fire, never even

  • getting out of the fire,

  • waiting to be eaten.

  • So I melt, nice and slow...

  • Nervous alert.

  • Nervous alert.

  • Oh, no, I think I'm gonna--

  • Boom!

  • Oh, no, I exploded.

  • Now I'm melting

  • into a gigantic puddle.

  • All that's left of me are...

  • I just can't handle it.

  • I just can't.

  • Oh my, I'm so embarrassed.

  • I just am.

  • I really hope

  • I pass third grade...

  • I have the whole world

  • on my shoulders.

  • This goes on my report card,

  • then my college education,

  • and that gets me a good job.

  • Somebody help.

  • I wonder what my score

  • is going to be?

  • Where is my paper?

  • Where is my number two pencil?

  • Because I can't read

  • that well, and I'm scared that I

  • won't understand the answers.

  • My hands were sweaty.

  • I almost started crying,

  • and I had a funny feeling

  • in my stomach.

  • I hope I never feel that way

  • again, especially by some test

  • I can't show the amazing work

  • I did all year.

  • Why judge them only on

  • one test?

  • Why not homework?

  • How about how neat they write,

  • how much they improved

  • throughout the year?

  • This test doesn't tell

  • and show the work you can

  • do best, like writing,

  • my favorite.

  • Every day I grow stronger,

  • but do you see that?

  • No, because...

  • I love school, and I feel

  • that we should not have to

  • be nervous this young.

  • Please help us third graders

  • with this situation.

  • [soft piano music]

  • ť ť

  • Wilson: Oddly enough,

  • this story begins between

  • Manhattan and Queens.

  • For the past nine months now,

  • I've made this commute

  • to Roosevelt Island,

  • home of 10,000 New York City

  • residents hoping to stray away

  • from the restlessness the city

  • is well known for.

  • I spent these months here,

  • the island's only public school.

  • It's here that I've been

  • reacquainted with

  • public schools--

  • this time, however,

  • rather than as a student,

  • as a student teacher.

  • This is also where I've

  • witnessed a reshaping

  • of education, one that's

  • occurring in all public schools,

  • one that promises to change

  • the face of education

  • as we know it,

  • one that promises no child

  • be left behind.

  • But are they?

  • Why?

  • Why is it--

  • Why did we need federal

  • legislation to mandate that kids

  • be tested, that there be this

  • compliance with standards?

  • And I think--

  • Wilson:

  • Well, what happened

  • essentially at the federal

  • level: they said that all kids--

  • [phone rings]

  • That all kids must

  • meet standards.

  • That's essentially

  • what was said.

  • And the standards will be

  • defined by the states, and all

  • kids will be subject to testing

  • starting in the third grade

  • and will have to be tested

  • yearly in order to ensure

  • that they're getting the type

  • of education that they are

  • entitled to, as determined by

  • their performance on

  • standardized tests, starting

  • as early as the third grade.

  • I had them write about

  • their feelings about

  • the upcoming test:

  • How are you feeling

  • about the test?

  • Do you feel prepared?

  • Why yes? Why not?

  • Wilson:

  • I felt awful.

  • I felt that it seemed as though

  • I was caught between

  • a rock and a hard place.

  • Because no matter how much

  • I prepared them for this test,

  • they were so anxious about it.

  • I was very worried that their

  • anxiety would override their

  • being prepared for the test.

  • woman: I, Michael R.

  • Bloomberg, do solemnly swear...

  • I, Michael R. Bloomberg,

  • do solemnly swear...

  • That I will support

  • the Constitution of

  • the United States...

  • That I will support

  • the Constitution of

  • the United States...

  • And the constitution

  • of the state of New York.

  • We will test our educators.

  • We will test our students.

  • The need is real.

  • The time is now.

  • Without authority there is

  • no accountability.

  • The public, through the mayor,

  • must control the school system.

  • [applause and cheers]

  • Wilson: Within six months,

  • legislation to rescue the city's

  • ailing schools was implemented.

  • Under the new system, the board

  • of education was completely

  • dismantled, thus making

  • the mayor directly responsible

  • for the schools' achievement

  • and the schools' held directly

  • accountable to the mayor.

  • Meanwhile, in Washington,

  • something very similar

  • was happening.

  • One week after Mayor Bloomberg

  • was sworn in, President Bush

  • signed into law the No Child

  • Left Behind Act, which, among

  • other things, made schools

  • accountable to the federal

  • government in exchange

  • for federal dollars.

  • The first day he was in

  • office, the day after he was out

  • all night, dancing at

  • the inaugural balls in 2001,

  • there was a reading conference

  • at the White House.

  • And out of that reading

  • conference came the Reading

  • First portion of the No Child

  • Left Behind, which put

  • $6 billion into federal grants

  • for reading instruction

  • to school districts

  • around the country.

  • Wilson: The Bush

  • administration offered

  • the Department of Education

  • unprecedented levels

  • of funding, far outspending any

  • prior administration in order to

  • support this massive overhaul

  • of public education.

  • However, many critics argue

  • it's still not enough,

  • the foremost of which being

  • the National Education

  • Association.

  • This so-called No Child Left

  • Behind is a reform piece,

  • offering reforms for education.

  • There's nothing wrong with that.

  • But if, in fact, you think

  • that you are ever going to have

  • reform without resources,

  • it's not going to happen.

  • And so when you have

  • the so-called No Child Left

  • Behind law and you want every

  • state to implement it,

  • you have to make sure

  • that the money is there

  • in order for them to do it.

  • Now, you will find--

  • and this is, again, where

  • the administration will have

  • some tension with us--

  • rather than argue whether or not

  • what I'm saying is true

  • as opposed to what they're

  • saying, I go to a state.

  • The state of Ohio, about a month

  • ago, they did their own study.

  • And through their own study

  • it was determined that if, in

  • fact, No Child Left Behind was

  • going to be implemented to its

  • entirety in the state of Ohio,

  • the state would have to pay

  • an additional--or come up with--

  • an additional $1.4 billion.

  • Well, if you think about

  • what do special interest groups

  • want from the federal

  • government, they want

  • more money.

  • I mean, it's sort of

  • what they do.

  • Lobbyists come to Washington

  • to get more money for a variety

  • of programs, whether we're

  • talking agriculture, defense,

  • environment, education.

  • That's what they do.

  • They demand more money.

  • So I don't think,

  • no matter how well you fund

  • or how much you fund any

  • particular program, you will

  • never hear a lobbyist for any

  • special interest come and say,

  • "Well, we've got enough money."

  • It just doesn't happen.

  • Wilson: One of the other

  • major criticisms of No Child

  • Left Behind deals with

  • the implications of using

  • a standardized test as means

  • of assessing achievement.

  • And that is where we left off

  • on Roosevelt Island.

  • I mean, of course they need