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  • This is CNN Students News. I'm Carl Azuz,

  • welcome to all of our viewers worldwide,

  • and if your school year is just getting started,

  • we hope it's going well for you so far.

  • We're back from the Labor Day holiday.

  • It's often viewed as the unofficial start

  • to the presidential campaign season,

  • and the candidates were out in force over the weekend.

  • Many are holding meetings, attending events,

  • hosting fundraisers and they're concentrating on Iowa and New Hampshire.

  • Those are the two states where the first caucuses

  • and primaries will be held early next year.

  • They'll help determine who each party's nominee

  • will be in next November's presidential election.

  • Five people are officially seeking the Democratic party's nomination.

  • 17 people are officially seeking the Republican party's nomination.

  • Across the Atlantic,

  • Europe is dealing with its most severe migration crisis since World War II.

  • Hundreds of thousands are crossing borders.

  • Most of them are from Afghanistan, Syria, and Iraq.

  • Some are migrants looking for a better life in Europe.

  • Many are refugees fleeing war- torn countries, or the ISIS terrorist group.

  • And some European officials are concerned

  • that terrorists themselves might cross into Europe with the asylum seekers.

  • Austria and Germany say they can't keep up with the influx of people.

  • They want other countries to help more.

  • France and Britain say they will, they're planning to accept tens of thousands.

  • Hungary has built a fence to prevent people

  • from entering from neighboring Serbia.

  • Their journey is treacherous.

  • It involves crossing nations on foot, walking dozens of miles.

  • It involves crossing the Mediterranean on overloaded, unstable boats.

  • Under the spotlight of a Turkish coast guard cutter.

  • Do you see? Do you see the refugees?

  • The silhouettes of more than 20 people stranded in a rubber boat.

  • They are desperate, frightened, but tonight,

  • luckily saved by volunteers from the Bodrum Sea Rescue Association,

  • who work alongside the Turkish Coast Guard.

  • Not all together. Wait. Wait.

  • Among the passengers rescued, five little children.

  • Just four days after the world was shocked by photographs

  • of a Syrian refugee toddler who drowned at sea,

  • these people have embarked on the exact same perilous journey.

  • They set off from the Turkish resort peninsula of Bodrum

  • in hope of reaching the Greek island of Kos.

  • Instead of drifting at sea with a failed engine,

  • these people will be brought back safely to Turkey.

  • The beaches below Bodrum's villas and posh resorts,

  • an unlikely launching point for tens of thousands of refugees

  • and migrants willing to risk everything to reach Europe.

  • Under the light of the crescent moon,

  • we witness another attempt at a crossing.

  • It's after 2AM and we've encountered another little rubber dinghy loaded with people.

  • They're actually paddling in the direction of Greece.

  • It's incredibly overloaded, this little boat.

  • It's an accident waiting to happen.

  • To make matters worse, some wear heavy backpacks over their life jackets.

  • The Coast Guard is coming.

  • Before possible disaster strikes, the Coast Guard comes to the rescue.

  • Tonight, they fail to reach Greece, but they will live another day.

  • See if you can ID me.

  • I'm an organic compound that's found in several of the foods we eat.

  • I'm naturally bitter in flavor,

  • I'm well known for stimulating the central nervous system.

  • I'm caffeine, a substance with several benefits and drawbacks.

  • Couple things you might not know about caffeine.

  • One, people can get physically dependent on it.

  • It's not considered as addictive as, say, illegal street drugs or alcohol.

  • But people who are used to caffeine and suddenly stop drinking

  • it can get headaches, they become anxious or depressed,

  • they can have a hard time concentrating.

  • Another thing about caffeine is that the US Food

  • and Drug Administration has a new warning out about it.

  • The alert focuses on pure powdered caffeine.

  • Something so potent that small amounts can cause an accidental overdose.

  • The FDA says it's aware of at least two people who have died from taking it.

  • Caffeine is everywhere. In coffee, iced tea,

  • chocolate, sodas, even in some medications.

  • It's a stimulant that can make you feel more alert

  • and give you that boost of energy.

  • It increases blood flow to the muscles, opens up your lungs.

  • It gives increased Performance, but when you consume to much of it,

  • caffeine can cause major health problems.

  • On average, most people can handle

  • about 300 to 400 milligrams of caffeine per day.

  • That's about what's in three to four six- ounce cups of coffee.

  • What's concerning these days is more

  • and more products contain larger amounts of caffeine.

  • Energy drinks, supplements,

  • even powdered caffeine contains way more of the substance than any cup of coffee.

  • For example, the FDA warns 1 teaspoon of powdered caffeine

  • is equivalent to 25 cups of coffee.

  • When they take what they think is a dose,

  • it's 10, 15, 20 times what they're expecting.

  • Consuming more than 1, 000 milligrams of caffeine

  • could lead to some serious side effects like an irregular heartbeat,

  • nausea, tremors, insomnia, and, in some rare situations, death.

  • So be aware of what you're drinking.

  • Best way to avoid caffeine overdose is to check the ingredients

  • just to see how much caffeine you're taking in.

  • Roll call requests are coming in from all over the world at CNNstudentnews. com.

  • Keep them coming.

  • L'Anse Creuse Middle School Central made today's roll.

  • It's in Harrison Township, Michigan, the home of the Lancers.

  • In North Carolina we've got the Raiders watching today.

  • Hello to our friends at Southern Vance High School.

  • And in Hsinchu Taiwan,

  • thank you for watching at the Pacific American School, it's great to see you.

  • Dr. David Sabgir is today's study in character.

  • While some physicians might keep extended hours or email

  • their patients or even make house calls, Dr. Sabgir joins his for a walk.

  • It helps them prevent heart disease,

  • the number one killer in America.

  • And his non profit Walk with the Doc now

  • has more than 160 chapters around the US,

  • with doctors and patients getting fit.

  • I knew something had to change, on my end, to stay healthy.

  • I'd go anywhere between 9 to 12 hours, all sitting at the desk.

  • You may be working a lot, but you're at the desk sitting.

  • How far do you think you could walk before you had to stop?

  • The number one problem I see my patients face

  • as a cardiologist is a sedentary lifestyle.

  • I was frustrated at my ineffectiveness to create change in my patients.

  • Hello. How are you? I'm fine.

  • So I said, how about if my family goes to the park,

  • would you be interested in joining us?

  • So, we'll see you tomorrow at the walk?

  • Oh, yes. The response was phenomenal.

  • I wanted to talk about how easy taking care of ourselves can be.

  • There's no better way that you can show a patient that you care about them,

  • than by going the extra mile with them. There's no wait in the office.

  • There's no fear of bad news.

  • It's just the patient and the physician talking about

  • whatever the patient wants to talk about.

  • In the beginning, I used to walk a mile or two.

  • By end of the year,

  • I've completed a full marathon.

  • I'm thinking of signing up for my second marathon.

  • Doctor Sabgir taught me you can achieve things that are really big,

  • but it all starts with small steps.

  • How many miles do you have in already?

  • 2. 7. 80 % of cardiac disease is preventable if we just go for a walk.

  • If people just take that first step, they will never look back.

  • Wahoo. High five.

  • Before we go, two words. Sky pool.

  • Well, actually it's one word,

  • and it describes one awesome swimming hole,

  • or suspended pool between two apartment buildings in London.

  • When it's complete in three years, it'll be ten stories above the ground,

  • 90 feet long, made out of see through acrylic that's eight inches thick.

  • But it's only four feet deep, so there won't be any skydiving, get it?

  • Of course, other apartments could build something like this.

  • They just have to pool their resources.

  • Given, critics might wonder,

  • water they thinking building this way above- ground pool?

  • But it shows that when it comes to aquatic construction,

  • the sky is not the limit.

  • If you're already on Instagram you might like the roll call tip we posted last night.

  • Instagram. com / cnnstudentnews

This is CNN Students News. I'm Carl Azuz,

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2015年9月8日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (September 8, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle)

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