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  • Hi, I'm Carl Azuz. Thanks for watching CNN student news

  • on this last day of August.

  • Special shout out to schools just getting back in session today.

  • Welcome to the show. First up, a storm at sea.

  • There's a system washing over the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

  • The U. S. Coast guard said yesterday that gale force winds

  • were possible on Key West,

  • and forecasters expected three to five inches of rain

  • in southern and central Florida.

  • But none of it was expected to be as severe as

  • what this system brought to the Carribean.

  • At one point, it was named Tropical Storm Erica.

  • Tropical storm is a scientific classification.

  • It means a storm is organized

  • and has sustained wind speeds of between 39 and 73 miles per hour.

  • Erica's torrential rains brought massive flooding

  • to the West Indian island of Dominica.

  • Mudslides and flooded rivers killed at least 20 people there.

  • Some others were missing after being swept away.

  • Meteorologist say the most deadly part of storms like these

  • is the flooding they bring.

  • Officials estimate the damage will cost Dominica tens of millions of dollars.

  • In the mid 1300, no disease or war was known to

  • have killed as many people as the Black Death did in Europe.

  • That's why you study the plague in world history.

  • What's surprising to a lot of people is that

  • the plague is still around and can still be deadly.

  • 12cases in seven states have been reported so far this year in the US.

  • Out of those 12, four people have died, including an elderly man in Utah.

  • Officials are trying to figure out how he got it.

  • And US health officials say other cases in California

  • and Georgia were linked to people

  • who traveled in or near Yosemite National Park.

  • The plague usually turns up between late spring and early fall

  • and usually in rural parts of Western states

  • like New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado.

  • The plague is caused by a bacteria called Yersinia Pestis

  • and most of the time humans get it from a flea bite.

  • Back when plague was rampant and there was no treatment for it,

  • plague could get into people's blood and it could turn their limbs black.

  • And that's where we get the term Black Death.

  • When the plague struck the Roman empire in the 6th century,

  • it went on to kill 25 million people.

  • Eventually, the plague wiped out 60 % of Europe.

  • Now before there were antibiotics,

  • the plague would kill between 66 and 93 % of people who got it.

  • Now, with antibiotics, that mortality rate goes down to about 16 %.

  • So typically every year in the United States

  • one person dies of the plague and seven people get sick.

  • Fever, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting,

  • if you get these symptoms and you're living in an area

  • where it's known that the plague has been before,

  • then you should go seek help from your doctor.

  • And you should definitely go to your doctor

  • if you develop huge lymph nodes.

  • Sometimes people with the plague,

  • they get lymph nodes the size of a chicken egg.

  • Also the Centers for Disease Control says

  • you should never feed rodents like squirrels

  • and rats and you certainly shouldn't touch them after they die.

  • We've done a great job of getting rid of the plague

  • almost entirely in this country.

  • Better hygiene goes a long way,

  • but you can't entirely get rid of the bacteria.

  • It's not just a dark ages bacteria, it's still with us.

  • See if you can ID me.

  • I'm one of the most used shipping lanes in the world.

  • I connect the Mediterranean Sea with the Red Sea.

  • I'm a man made water way named for a city in Egypt.

  • I'm the Suez Canal, and I first opened in 1869.

  • The Suez Canal has been expanded several times since then.

  • It's been made wider, deeper, accessible to more ships.

  • It's most recent expansion was opened earlier this month.

  • But these projects have had some side effects.

  • One of them is a type of nomad jellyfish.

  • It's showing up and stinging swimmers on the beaches of Israel

  • and the eastern Mediterranean.

  • Marine biologists say it has no business being there.

  • These nomad jellyfish are natives of the Indian Ocean,

  • thousands of miles away.

  • Scientists say they came here through Suez Canal,

  • and that they're an invasive species,

  • meaning they can push out other species that were here first,

  • dramatically and quickly changing the ecosystem of the Eastern Mediterranean.

  • Biologist expect this will happen more and more as the Suez expands.

  • Well it's time to take roll.

  • It's not the first time we've ever announced the African nation of Tanzania.

  • But it is the first time we've shouted out

  • the International School of Tanganyika. It's in Dar- es- Salaam.

  • And we're grateful to be part of your day.

  • On the US west coast, Vale,Oregon is on today.

  • From Vale middle school, the vikings are sailing with CNN student news.

  • And in Wichita, Kansas, great to see the Grizzlies today.

  • Northwest High School rounds out our roll.

  • Green bank, West Virginia, population about 143,

  • is a town as old- fashioned as it is small.

  • No microwaves. No wi- fi. No cell phones.

  • Need to make a call? Find a land line or a pay phone.

  • Need the number? Open the phone book.

  • Hard to believe it's home to one of the largest,

  • most technologically advanced pieces of research equipment on the planet.

  • When you describe this area,

  • you basically have to always talk about how it's a little bit outside of time.

  • It's a little hamlet that hadn't changed much in the last hundred years.

  • I tell some visitors that Green bank is where

  • you can come to get away from the United States.

  • What we have here is a collection of radio telescopes

  • that pick up radio waves that are naturally emitted by objects in the universe.

  • In order to do that, we need to have some special restrictions,

  • some unusual conditions.

  • It impacts the lives of the people that live around here.

  • We cannot use cell phones.

  • Earlier years, we couldn't have a microwave.

  • I'm not allowed to have wireless.

  • If you're in your car and you push the little button on your radio for it to seek,

  • then it's just gonna go around and around and not find much.

  • The observatory is in the middle of a 13, 000 square mile area

  • called the National Radio Quiet Zone.

  • And it's a unique area in North America

  • that is set up to protect this telescope, in particular,

  • from interfering signals from new transmissions.

  • We hear silence.

  • People feel like there's a lot of logistical disadvantages

  • from being from here and by being educated here

  • I've always felt quite the opposite.

  • That it gave me unique opportunities, unique skills, unique perspectives.

  • There's something about living in a rural area that gives you a value.

  • It holds a family together more, I think.

  • I just love our little town, our little community. I love the people in it.

  • I know that, if my car breaks down or if I have a flat tire,

  • people will stop and ask me, do you want a ride?

  • Do you need some help?

  • Because they know that nobody has cell phones to rely on.

  • There's something that happens to you

  • where you begin to discover who you are.

  • You have the time to reflect. I was away from home for 22 years,

  • and it's just nice to be back, and just be part of things.

  • I think Green bank can grow, and prosper, and it won't be ruined

  • because it doesn't have wireless.

  • That's not what makes a community.

  • Twenty years ago, there was really nothing like the cellular technology

  • that everybody takes for granted.

  • And so, to me, it seems a little odd that people now find the absence

  • of the technology something worth discussing, even.

  • Never had it, so it doesn't make much difference.

  • If you never had something, how can you ever miss it?

  • Ever wonder what a marmot sounds like?

  • Well, probably not, but in case you're curious now

  • There you go.

  • The wascally wodent was captured on camera by some hikers at Black ConeMountain

  • in British Columbia. It was apparently trying to frighten them away.

  • it didn't work. They just stood there and laughed.

  • We've heard about what the fox say.

  • We've laughed at a screaming goat.

  • Why shouldn't this guy get a word in?

  • It marmot not be very intimidating.

  • It ro-didn't scare anyone away,

  • but the hikers thought it was a scream.

  • I know this video will probably prairie dog that mammal for years to come.

  • The hikers did what any others would, Chuck.

Hi, I'm Carl Azuz. Thanks for watching CNN student news

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2015年8月31日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (August 31, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle)

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