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  • Fridays are awesome!

  • Welcome to the week’s last edition of CNN Student news.

  • My name is Carl Azuz. We hope youre day is going well.

  • Europe is a continent facing a crisis.

  • 3, 000 men, women and children rescued in the Mediterranean.

  • Dozens of others found dead on boats or other vehicles.

  • This happened over two days this week.

  • Hundreds of thousands of people are fleeing their homeland, hoping for asylum,

  • a safe and secure place to live In Europe.

  • Theyre leaving behind violence in Afghanistan, instability in Libya,

  • a years long civil war in Syria.

  • And some of the European countries where theyre headed

  • are feeling a strain on their borders.

  • Hungary, for instance, says, the flow of migrants is creating an emergency.

  • Its government says 1, 500 people are illegally entering the country daily.

  • It calls that unacceptable.

  • Hungary is sending as many as two thousand police officers

  • to help secure it’s borders. It’s also building a temporary barrier.

  • A type of fence along it’s border with Serbia.

  • Walls have been built throughout history to protect countries

  • or to keep certain groups of people apart.

  • The Great Wall of China may be the most famous example.

  • There’s also Hadrian’s Wall,

  • intended to shield Roman Britain from what the Roman’s called Barbarians.

  • Peace Walls in Northern Ireland

  • still separate Catholic areas from Protestant ones.

  • Spanish territory in Morocco is fenced in,

  • a United Nations Buffer Zone stretches across the island of Cypress.

  • The number of walls separating different parts of the world

  • seems to be increasing.

  • Katrina formed on Wednesday August 24th, 2005.

  • Here’s the storm as it moves on up.

  • It was just a tropical storm, at first, off the coast of Florida.

  • But the next day it strengthened to a category one hurricane.

  • Yesterday I signed a disaster declaration for the state of Louisiana.

  • And this morning I signed a disaster declaration for the state of Mississippi.

  • By Saturday, Katrina had doubled in size and was now a category three storm.

  • A major hurricane. And on Sunday morning, August 28.

  • Katrina had strengthened to a Category four when New Orleans right in it’s path.

  • Every person is hereby ordered to immediately evacuate the city of New Orleans.

  • That same day the National Weather Service

  • issued one of it’s strongest warnings ever.

  • Persons, pets, and livestock exposed to the winds

  • will face certain death if struck.

  • Roads jammed as thousands try to make it out of the city,

  • but the storm veered and New Orleans was spared a direct hit.

  • Everything seemed okay until later that night

  • when water started toppling over the levees.

  • When is this thing suppose to stop?

  • By 7 a. m in the next morning, the city is flooding.

  • But New Orleans isn’t alone.

  • Biloxi and Gulfport, Mississippi are slammed by Katrina’s front right quadrant.

  • Who was at your house with you?

  • My wife. Where is she now? Can’t find her body. She’s gone.

  • Tuesday, August 30th, Katrina has weakened into a heavy storm over Tennessee.

  • But New Orleans continues to flood from breaks in it’s levees.

  • Hundreds of thousands are suddenly homeless.

  • And it would be weeks before the waters finally went down.

  • More than 10, 000 people sought shelter

  • in the heavily damaged New Orleans Superdome after Hurricane Katrina.

  • Tomorrow marks 10 years to the day that the storm roared ashore.

  • It was blamed for the deaths of more than 1800 people across 5 states.

  • Katrina wasn’t the deadliest hurricane to hit U. S. shores

  • but the government says it was the costliest.

  • Estimating the damage at 108 billion dollars.

  • Waveland, Mississippi about 50 miles east of New Orleans

  • was called Ground Zero for Katrina.

  • More than 90 % of homes there were destroyed.

  • The main street, Coleman Avenue, was described as just dirt, mud,

  • and tents after the storm.

  • But ten years later, like parts of New Orleans, there are signs of recovery.

  • Vikings and pirates and warriors, oh my. It’s time for the roll call.

  • Olathe Middle and High School is up first. It’s in Olathe, Colorado.

  • The Vikings and the Pirates are watching there.

  • W. P. Davidson High School is Mobile, Alabama.

  • That’s where the Warriors are watching CNN Student News today.

  • And in the city of Sapporo, Japan,

  • it’s great to be part of your day at the School for Educational Alternatives.

  • Thank you all for your requests at cnnstudentnews. com.

  • If I were to say tallest mountain in the world, you’d probably think Everest.

  • At 29, 029 feet high it’s altitude is tops,

  • but from base to summit the tallest mountain is actually Mauna Kea.

  • It stands about 13, 800 feet above sea level but most of it is under water.

  • The total height of this Hawaiian is over 33 thousand feet.

  • And though it’s a dormant volcano, controversy has erupted there for decades.

  • Mauna Kea, which means white mountain,

  • is one of the tallest summits in the world.

  • It’s also home to 13 of the best astronomical telescopes in science.

  • Astronomers believe this is the perfect location to study the stars.

  • This summit is the darkest spot on Earth. The darkest spot on Earth.

  • Incredible, it gives us nice dark skies

  • that allows us to look at fainter and fainter things.

  • Now, scientists plant to build a new 30 meter telescope on the summit.

  • The TMT, as it’s often called,

  • would be the most powerful and advanced telescope on the planet.

  • Researchers say the 18 story telescope

  • would let them see up to 13 billion light years away.

  • The TMT represents a jump of a factor of 10.

  • That we would be able to look 10 times further into our universe.

  • But to native Hawaiians.

  • This is the most sacred mountain on the island.

  • For Grandpas and Grandmas.

  • It’s where their earliest ancestors originated and they consider it a temple.

  • They do not want any more construction here,

  • and have taken legal action to stop it.

  • A group of opponents, who also call themselves protectors,

  • sued the state of Hawaii for granting the TMT company,

  • a permit they say, is inconsistent with the states conservation laws.

  • You have to remember that Mauna Kea

  • and it’s entirety is a conservation district

  • and conservation districts are one of the highest protected levels and their,

  • it’s supposed to be no construction.

  • The debate between Astronomers and Native Hawaiians dates

  • back to the 1960s when the University of Hawaii first started plans

  • to turn Mauna Kea into a leading sight for astronomy.

  • We as Hawaiians, astronomy is so much apart of our life,

  • of who we are of what we were, that in fact it’s kind of crazy not to to welcome it.

  • Because of the historic controversy,

  • it took several years for the $ 1. 4 billion TMT Project

  • to get approved by the state of Hawaii.

  • In April, they finally started construction.

  • But that all came to a halt just a few days later

  • when hundreds of protesters showed up

  • and shut down the project.

  • More than 30 protestors were arrested that day on charges of obstruction.

  • There have been several more arrests on the summit,

  • because each time TMT workers try to build, protestors step in.

  • We have reached our limit,

  • and science has to accept that there are human limits also.

  • The Hawaii Supreme Court has decided to take on the protector’s lawsuit.

  • There the final decision will be made on

  • whether the permit to build this telescope is valid or not.

  • In the meantime, the TMT Company

  • has the legal right to continue construction at any point,

  • but the protectors say theyre ready to stop them.

  • Before we go, our mother’s told us not to play with our food.

  • At the annual La Tomatino Festival in Spain,

  • that’s the whole point y’all.

  • No one really knows how this tomatoey tradition got started,

  • but it’s been going strong since about 1945.

  • Today, it involves 20, 000 people, about 100 tons of overripe tomatoes,

  • the fruit fight lasts 1 hour,

  • and firetrucks spray down the streets afterward to clean up.

  • The people, though, are on their own,

  • and theyll need a shower from head to- may- toes.

  • It looks like they had fun, but they all see red.

  • They all bring excitement to the vegetable,

  • and were betting none of them go home hungry.

  • Hey. If youre already on Instagram, find us on CNN Student News.

  • Just look for the blue check mark.

  • Well be showing some sweet behind the scenes stuff.

  • We may even cook up some tips on how to get on roll- call.

  • Instagram. com / ccn. studentnews and have a great weekend.

Fridays are awesome!

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2015年8月28日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (August 28, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle)

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